Review: Propofol Relatively Safe in Endoscopic Procedures

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
Review: Propofol Relatively Safe in Endoscopic Procedures
Review: Propofol Relatively Safe in Endoscopic Procedures

MONDAY, Aug. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The risks of cardiopulmonary adverse events are similar for propofol sedation versus traditional agents in gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures, with fewer complications associated with use in simple endoscopic procedures, according to a review published online July 20 in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Vaibhav Wadhwa, M.D., from Fairview Hospital in Cleveland, and colleagues conducted a systematic review to compare sedation-related adverse events associated with the use of propofol versus non-propofol agents in gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. Procedures were divided into two groups: a non-advanced endoscopic procedure group (NAEG) and an advanced endoscopic procedure group (AEG). Data were included from 27 original studies with 2,518 participants, of whom 1,324 received propofol and 1,194 received midazolam, meperidine, pethidine, remifentanil, and/or fentanyl.

The researchers found that with use of propofol compared with traditional sedative agents (TS), the pooled odds ratio for developing hypoxia for all procedures combined was 0.82 (95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.63 to 1.07) and for developing hypotension was 0.92 (95 percent CI, 0.64 to 1.32). Those who received propofol were less likely to develop complications than those receiving TS in the NAEG (odds ratio, 0.61; 95 percent CI, 0.38 to 0.99). For the AEG there was no difference in the complication rate (odds ratio, 0.86; 95 percent CI, 0.56 to 1.34).

"Propofol sedation has similar risk of cardiopulmonary adverse events compared with traditional agents for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures," the authors write. "Propofol use in simple endoscopic procedures was associated with decreased number of complications."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

Readings Taken in Clinic May Underestimate Ambulatory BP

Readings Taken in Clinic May Underestimate Ambulatory BP

Young, lean patients can have hypertension not caught during regular exams, researchers find

Measures Sought to ID Epilepsy Patients Who Are Safe to Drive

Measures Sought to ID Epilepsy Patients Who Are ...

Those with longer seizures during driving tests more likely to have accidents

Epilepsy Onset Not Uncommon After Stroke

Epilepsy Onset Not Uncommon After Stroke

Patients with greater brain damage more likely to have seizures afterwards, researchers find

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »