Rate of Hip Fracture Declining in End-Stage Renal Disease

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Rate of Hip Fracture Declining in End-Stage Renal Disease
Rate of Hip Fracture Declining in End-Stage Renal Disease

MONDAY, June 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the rate of hip fracture decreased from 2003 to 2011, according to a study published online June 22 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

Sun Moon Kim, M.D., from the Stanford University School of Medicine in California, and colleagues used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to identify hospitalizations for hip fracture from 2003 to 2011 among the ESRD population, and calculated population-specific rates using data from the U.S. Renal Data System and the U.S. census.

The researchers identified 47,510 hip fractures in the ESRD population, with an overall rate of hip fracture of 10.04/1,000 person-years. The rates were 3.73 and 20.97/1,000 person-years in patients aged younger than 65 years and aged 65 years or older, respectively. From 2003 to 2011 there was a 12.6 percent decrease in age- and sex-standardized rates (from 10.23 to 8.94/1,000 person-years). Over time, hip fracture rates were virtually identical in patients aged younger than 65 years; among patients aged 65 years or older, rates decreased by 15.3 percent. The decline in rates was more rapid in older women versus older men. From 2003 to 2011 there was a 26.7 percent decrease in in-hospital mortality rate after hip fracture (from 8.6 to 6.3 percent).

"In ESRD, age- and sex-standardized hip fracture rates and associated in-hospital mortality have declined substantially over the last decade," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to Amgen.

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