Productivity Up for Stand-Capable Desk Users

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Productivity Up for Stand-Capable Desk Users
Productivity Up for Stand-Capable Desk Users

WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stand-capable desk users are more productive than their seated counterparts, according to a study published online May 24 in IIE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors.

Gregory Garrett, from Texas A&M Health Science Center in College Station, and colleagues compared objective measures of productivity over time between stand-capable desk users and a seated control group in a call center. For 167 employees, comparison analysis was completed across two job categories.

The researchers found that, compared with seated employees, stand-capable desk users were about 45 percent more productive on a daily basis. Over time, the productivity of stand-capable desk users increased significantly, from about 23 percent in the first month to about 53 percent over the next six months. The increase in productivity was similar across both job categories.

"These findings suggest important benefits of employing stand-capable desks in the work force to increase productivity," the authors write. "Prospective studies that include employee health status, perceptions of (dis)comfort, and preference over time, along with productivity metrics, are needed to test the effectiveness of stand-capable desks on employee health and performance."

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