October 2016 Briefing - Pharmacy

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pharmacy for October 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Opioid Poisonings in Children, Teens Rising Dramatically

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The number of young children and teens hospitalized for overdosing on opioids has increased nearly two-fold in recent years, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Guidelines Presented for Fluoroquinolone Use in Children

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a clinical report published online Oct. 31 in Pediatrics, guidelines are presented for the use of systemic and topical fluoroquinolones in children.

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Questionnaire, Peak Flow Can ID Undiagnosed COPD

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A five-item questionnaire plus peak expiratory flow (PEF) can identify undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Timely Antibiotic Administration Cuts Death in Cirrhosis, UGIB

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Timely administration of antibiotics is associated with a reduction in mortality among patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), according to a study published in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Few Changes in Employer-Sponsored Insurance 2013-2014

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Private sector employer-sponsored health insurance offerings were similar in 2013 and 2014, with <3.5 percent of employers dropping coverage and 1.1 percent adding coverage, according to a report published online Oct. 26 in Health Affairs.

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Low-Dose Isotretinoin Therapeutic for Seborrhea

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with moderate-to-severe seborrhea and seborrheic dermatitis, low-dose oral isotretinoin can be therapeutic, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in the International Journal of Dermatology.

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Diabetes-Related Distress Ups Risk for Rx Nonadherence

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes-related distress and depression symptom severity are risk factors for medication nonadherence in type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Diabetes Care.

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Skin Patch to Treat Peanut Allergy Appears Promising

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A skin patch that delivers small amounts of peanut protein may help treat children and young adults with peanut allergy, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Male Contraceptive Effective, but Side Effects Problematic

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A contraceptive injection for men shows some promise, but researchers are still struggling to improve its effectiveness and deal with severe side effects caused by the injections, according to a study published online Oct. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Education Needed Regarding Use of Herbal Weight Loss Products

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Health care professionals need education about the safety and effectiveness of weight loss medications, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in the Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research.

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Subconjunctival Gentamicin Can Cause Macular Necrosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Subconjunctival gentamicin can cause macular necrosis in the eye, according to a letter to the editor published online Oct. 20 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

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Quality Improvement Methods Improve Asthma Care

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of quality improvement (QI) methods can improve timely administration of short-acting β-agonists (SABAs) for acute asthma in a pediatric emergency department, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Lower Costs for Pregabalin in Peripheral Neuropathic Pain

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP), the adjusted cost per patient is lower for treatment with pregabalin than gabapentin, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Cancer Survivors Have Higher Rate of Antidepressant Use

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment for depression and anxiety is nearly twice as common among U.S. cancer survivors as it is for those with no history of cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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FDA Warns of Testosterone, AAS Abuse and Dependence

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Supplemental testosterone and related anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) can cause heart attacks, personality changes, and infertility, and are easily abused, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns, adding that labeling on all prescription testosterone products will be revised.

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Statins Offset Insulin-Related Cancer Risk in T2DM

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), use of statins offsets insulin-related cancer risks, according to research published online Oct. 21 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Heart Failure Care Up, Regardless of Hospital Teaching Status

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to performance measures is similar at teaching hospitals (TH) and nonteaching hospitals (NTH), according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Review: No Clear Link for Calcium Supplements, CVD

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Calcium supplements, taken within recommended levels, can be considered safe for the heart, according to new guidelines and an evidence review published online Oct. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Narrow-Spectrum Abx Feasible in Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- It may be safe to switch from broad- to narrow-spectrum antibiotic coverage once hospitalized patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia reach clinical stability, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Rx Subsidy Ups Persistence to Breast Cancer Hormone Therapy

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For white, black, and Hispanic women, receipt of a prescription subsidy is associated with improved persistence to breast cancer hormone therapy, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Liraglutide Increases Heart Rate in T2DM With Stable CAD

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Liraglutide increases heart rate (HR) and reduces heart rate variability (HRV) in overweight patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D) and stable coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Diabetes Care.

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Saxagliptin Linked to Improved Albumin/Creatinine Ratios

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, saxagliptin is associated with improvement in the albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR), according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Diabetes Care.

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Continued 2 Percent Daily Testosterone Safe, Effective

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Once-daily testosterone solution 2 percent (T-sol) is safe and improves sex drive and energy in men with androgen deficiency, according to a study published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Guidance for Coronary Patients With ASA/NSAID Sensitivity

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable chronic ischemic heart disease (CIHD) and histories of nonsevere hypersensitivity reactions to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), an ASA challenge is recommended, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Allergy.

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Resveratrol Doesn't Improve Insulin Sensitivity

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Resveratrol supplementation does not improve hepatic or peripheral insulin sensitivity among patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Diabetes Care.

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Acidic Skin Care Product Beneficial in Older Adults

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults, an acidic skin care product with different plant oils improves epidermal barrier formation and increases lipid lamellae in the intercellular space of the stratum corneum (SC), according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the International Journal of Cosmetic Science.

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Switching Diet Drinks for Water Benefits Overweight Women

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For overweight and obese women with type 2 diabetes, replacement of diet beverages (DBs) with water is associated with greater weight reduction and improvements in glucose metabolism, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Bundled-Payment Program Deemed Better for Breast CA Care

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For breast cancer care, a bundled-payment program is associated with better adherence to quality indicators and better outcomes over time compared with a fee-for-service (FFS) program, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Oncology.

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pCR of 37 Percent for Topical Imiquimod in Lentigo Maligna

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with lentigo maligna (LM) in-situ melanoma, topical imiquimod has a pathological complete regression (pCR) rate of 37 percent, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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CDC: Two Doses of HPV Vaccine Sufficient for Children Under 15

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children 14 and younger require only two doses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rather than the previously recommended three doses, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Open-Label Placebo Treatments Can Ease Chronic Low Back Pain

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who knowingly took a placebo pill while undergoing traditional treatment for lower back pain had less pain and disability than those who received traditional treatment alone, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Pain.

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Resveratrol Reduces Ovarian, Adrenal Androgens in PCOS

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), resveratrol is associated with significant reductions in ovarian and adrenal androgens, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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FDA Approves New Treatment for Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Lartruvo (olaratumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with certain soft tissue sarcomas.

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Certain Factors Predict Repeat ER Visits for Ureteral Stones

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with ureteral stones, those who are younger, have proximal stones, and require intravenous narcotics for pain control are more likely to return to the emergency department within 30 days, according to a study published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Financial Toxicity Is a Relevant Cancer Outcome Measure

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Financial toxicity is a clinically relevant outcome for patients receiving treatment for advanced cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Cancer.

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Researchers Find Antidepressant Bupropion Crosses Placenta

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In pregnant women taking the antidepressant bupropion, the drug and its active metabolites cross the placenta to the fetal circulation, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Researchers Say Not All A-Fib Patients Need Anticoagulation

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients with atrial fibrillation who have implanted pacemakers or defibrillators may not always need anticoagulation, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Circulation.

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Postprandial Walk Beneficial in Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, a short walk after eating may help lower blood glucose levels more than exercising at other times of the day, according to research published online Oct. 17 in Diabetologia.

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AHA Urges Awareness of Statin Interaction With Other CV Meds

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Statins can interact with other drugs prescribed for cardiovascular disease, but there are ways to navigate the issue, according to new recommendations from the American Heart Association published online Oct. 17 in Circulation.

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Herbal, Dietary Supplements Cause One-Fifth of Hepatotoxicity

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Herbal and dietary supplement (HDS)-induced liver injury accounts for 20 percent of cases of hepatotoxicity in the United States, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Hepatology.

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HBV, HCV Coinfection Ups Non-Hodgkin Risk in ART-Treated HIV

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic coinfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) among patients with HIV receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART), according to a study published online Oct. 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Spironolactone Benefits Exercise Tolerance in HFpEF

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) with an exercise-induced increase in the ratio between early mitral inflow velocity and mitral annular early diastolic velocity (E/e'), spironolactone is associated with improved exercise capacity, according to a study published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Topotecan-Based Therapy Beneficial for Retinoblastoma

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with advanced retinoblastoma, topotecan combined with vincristine, carboplatin, and aggressive focal therapies is effective, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Considerable Economic Burden for Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For U.S. adults, the economic burden associated with vaccine-preventable diseases was estimated at about $9 billion in 2015, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Quality of Outpatient Care Has Not Consistently Improved in U.S.

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts to improve the quality of clinical care in the United States have had little impact on many aspects of outpatient care, according to an analysis published online Oct. 17 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Adolescent BMI Predicts Diabetes Mellitus Mortality

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent body mass index (BMI) predicts diabetes mellitus (DM) mortality in midlife, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Diabetes Care.

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CDC: Complementary Health Use Up With Musculoskeletal Pain

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of complementary health approaches is significantly higher for U.S. adults with musculoskeletal pain disorders, according to a report published online Oct. 12 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health Statistics Reports.

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Data Mining, Experiments ID QT Prolonging Drug Interactions

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Data mining coupled with laboratory experiments can identify QT interval-prolonging drug-drug interactions (QT-DDIs), according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Early Births Down With 17α-Hydroxyprogesterone Caproate

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women with a prior preterm birth, cerclage plus 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate is associated with a significant reduction in delivery at less than 24 weeks of gestation compared with cerclage alone, according to a study published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Alemtuzumab May Reverse Some Disability in Newly-Diagnosed MS

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The multiple sclerosis (MS) drug alemtuzumab, usually reserved for patients in the late stages of the disease, seems to offer long-term remission in newly diagnosed patients, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Neurology.

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DEA Halts Move to Ban Controversial Herbal Kratom

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Bowing to public pressure, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration has halted a move to ban a plant called kratom, which experts say could help battle the nation's opioid epidemic.

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Inhaled Levodopa May Rapidly Relieve Parkinson's Symptoms

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An inhaled version of the Parkinson's drug levodopa can help when patients experience symptoms between doses of the pill form of the medication, according to a study published in the Oct. 12 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Low Diastolic Pressure Linked to Subclinical Myocardial Damage

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low diastolic blood pressure (DBP) seems to be associated with subclinical myocardial damage, according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Calcium Supplements May Be Detrimental to Heart Health

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary calcium in the form of supplements, but not calcium-rich foods, might have a harmful impact on the heart, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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SSRI Use During Pregnancy Tied to Speech Issues in Offspring

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose mothers used a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) during pregnancy may be more likely to develop speech and language disorders, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Some Antihypertensives Linked to Depression, Bipolar Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some antihypertensive medications may increase the risk that patients will be hospitalized for depression and bipolar disorder, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Hypertension.

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Social Reintegration of Hodgkin's Survivors Impeded by Fatigue

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Severe fatigue (sFA) can impede social reintegration in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) survivors, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Most Anaphylaxis Patients in ER Treated Appropriately

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of anaphylaxis patients seeking treatment in Belgian emergency departments are treated in accordance with the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) guidelines, according to a study published Oct. 6 in Allergy.

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Trends in Dietary Supplement Use Among U.S. Adults Changing

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of traditional multivitamins is decreasing among Americans, while supplements such as vitamin D, fish oil, and probiotics are becoming more popular, according to a study published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Placebo Effect Seen in Chiropractic Tx of Migraine

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Real and sham chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (CSMT) are equally likely to ease patients' migraine pain, according to a study published online Oct. 2 in the European Journal of Neurology.

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DEET to Protect Against Zika Appears Safe During Pregnancy

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) insect repellents won't harm a pregnant woman or her fetus when used as instructed to prevent Zika infection, according to research published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Costs of Chemo for Breast Cancer Vary Widely in the United States

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer chemotherapy costs can vary by tens of thousands of dollars in the United States, depending on the course of treatment doctors select, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Cancer.

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CDI Risk Up When Prior Occupant of Hospital Bed Got Antibiotics

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When a hospital patient is taking antibiotics, the next patient to use the same bed may face an elevated risk of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), according to a study published online Oct. 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Radiomic-Based Method Predicts Recurrent Glioblastoma Outcome

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A radiomic-based approach can be used to generate a prediction model for stratifying treatment outcome among patients with recurrent glioblastoma prior to bevacizumab treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Copay Assist Programs Creating Problems in Health Care Markets

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Despite offering assistance to individuals who cannot afford expensive medications, copay assistance programs create broader problems in health care markets, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Oct. 11 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Not Enough Men Who Have Sex With Men Aware of PrEP

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many men who have sex with men (MSM) are not aware that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) medication can protect them from HIV, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Even Partial Antenatal Steroid Treatment Benefits Preemies

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Even partial steroid treatment before birth can improve survival odds for extremely premature infants and reduce their risk of certain birth defects, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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U.S. Health Care System Is One of the Least Efficient Worldwide

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is one of the least efficient worldwide based on a Bloomberg index that assesses life expectancy, health care spending per capita, and relative spending as a share of gross domestic product, according to a report published by Bloomberg.

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Daily Intranasal Steroid Tx Not Better for Allergy Relief

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Daily intranasal corticosteroids (INCS) are not superior to on-demand INCS or to antihistamine on demand for the treatment of pollen-related allergies in children, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Allergy.

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New Drug for Alcohol Use Disorder Appears Promising

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug -- a vasopressin antagonist called ABT-436 -- shows some promise in treating alcohol use disorder and smoking, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Neuropsychopharmacology.

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Global Burden of Disease Report Evaluates the World's Health

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The United States lags behind other advanced nations when it comes to infant mortality and the life expectancy of its citizens, according to a comprehensive review of global health statistics published in the Oct. 8 issue of The Lancet.

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Price Increases Larger for Older Cancer Drugs Than Newer Ones

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- After adjusting for inflation, nearly two-thirds of 86 cancer medications had price increases between 2010 and 2015, according to a research letter published online Oct. 6 in JAMA Oncology.

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Long-Term Tamoxifen Does Lower Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors does cut breast cancer patients' risk of developing cancer in their other breast, according to findings published online Oct. 6 in JAMA Oncology.

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Adding Daratumumab to Standard Tx Effective in Multiple Myeloma

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adding daratumumab to standard treatment for advanced cases of multiple myeloma may significantly improve patients' chances of a response and even recovery, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Dermatologists Receive Considerable Industry Payments

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dermatologists receive considerable payments, mainly from the pharmaceutical industry, with variation in the nature and amount of payments, according to research published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Dermatology.

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DEA Planning to Cut Production of Opioid Medication

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) says it has mandated significant cuts in the production of Schedule II opiate and opioid medication.

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Burns, Blast Injuries on the Rise From Exploding E-Cigarettes

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic-cigarette devices are randomly and unexpectedly exploding, burning and injuring people near them when they detonate, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CDC Reviews Measles Outbreak in Amish Community

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The measles outbreak that occurred in an Amish community in 2014 illustrates the ongoing threat the infection presents -- and the importance of routine vaccination, U.S. government researchers report in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Denver Clinic Boosts HPV Vaccination Rates

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The way to increase the number of girls and boys who get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine may be as simple as giving it as part of a routine bundle of vaccines, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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U.S. Smoking Rates Vary Across Counties Within States

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Parts of the Midwest and South have the highest smoking rates in the United States, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Opioid Use Disorder, Heroin Use Up Among Young Adults

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults in the United States are more likely to become addicted to prescription opioids than they were in years past, and they're also more likely to use heroin, according to a study recently published online in Addictive Behaviors.

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Vitamin D Doesn't Improve Glucose Measures

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Weekly doses of vitamin D do not improve oral glucose tolerance or markers of glycemic status among those at risk for diabetes, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Exenatide Does Not Promote Weight Loss in Schizophrenia

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For antipsychotic-treated obese patients with schizophrenia, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) do not appear to promote weight loss, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Biologics Tied to Opportunistic Infection Risk in IBD

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), biologic agents increase the risk of infection, especially opportunistic infection, but do not increase the risk of serious infection or malignancy, according to a review published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Botox, InterStim Compared in Female Urinary Incontinence

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women with refractory urgency urinary incontinence, onabotulinumtoxinA injections may help control leakage better than the implanted nerve stimulation device InterStim, according to a study published in the Oct. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Patient Satisfaction Up With Pharmacist-Managed Warfarin Tx

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pharmacist-managed warfarin anticoagulation therapy is associated with improved patient satisfaction, although the benefits in terms of control, safety, and mortality are unclear, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Higher Bleeding Risk Seen With Rivaroxaban Versus Dabigatran

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Rivaroxaban may pose a slightly greater risk of serious bleeding than dabigatran in patients with atrial fibrillation, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Long-Term Pigmentation With Minocycline in Sclerotherapy

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing sclerotherapy, oral minocycline may induce significant pigmentation, according to a case report published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Cutaneous Pathology.

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Risks, Benefits of Cangrelor Consistent in Angina, ACS

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with stable angina (SA) or acute coronary syndrome (ACS), the benefits and risks of cangrelor are consistent, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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2 mg/kg/day Azathioprine Best for Crohn's in Chinese Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For Chinese patients with Crohn's disease (CD), 2 mg/kg/day azathioprine (AZA) seems more effective than 1 mg/kg/day, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Digestive Diseases.

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Statins Reduce Risk of Mortality in Multiple Myeloma

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Statin therapy is associated with reduced risk of all-cause and multiple myeloma (MM)-specific mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Medication Adherence Stressful for Psoriasis Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adhering to medication regimens for the treatment of psoriasis can be an additional source of considerable emotional distress for patients, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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