October 2016 Briefing - Pediatrics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for October 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Clean Indoor Environment Can Help Keep Asthma in Check

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing indoor allergens and pollutants can help control children's asthma, reducing their need for medication, according to a report from the American Academy of Pediatrics published online Oct. 31 in Pediatrics.

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Opioid Poisonings in Children, Teens Rising Dramatically

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The number of young children and teens hospitalized for overdosing on opioids has increased nearly two-fold in recent years, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Guidelines Presented for Fluoroquinolone Use in Children

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a clinical report published online Oct. 31 in Pediatrics, guidelines are presented for the use of systemic and topical fluoroquinolones in children.

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Few Changes in Employer-Sponsored Insurance 2013-2014

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Private sector employer-sponsored health insurance offerings were similar in 2013 and 2014, with <3.5 percent of employers dropping coverage and 1.1 percent adding coverage, according to a report published online Oct. 26 in Health Affairs.

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Skin Patch to Treat Peanut Allergy Appears Promising

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A skin patch that delivers small amounts of peanut protein may help treat children and young adults with peanut allergy, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Eating Reassessment Urged After Negative Oral Food Challenge

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For children with a negative oral food challenge (OFC), there is a correlation between consumption of reintroduced food with the child's interest in tasting new foods before and after the challenge, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in Allergy.

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Useful Tips Offered for Addressing Negative Patient Reviews

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an article published in Medical Economics, five tips are presented to address negative patient reviews.

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Child-Parent Screening for Hypercholesterolemia Feasible

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for hypercholesterolemia is feasible at routine child immunization visits in primary care practices, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Quality Improvement Methods Improve Asthma Care

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of quality improvement (QI) methods can improve timely administration of short-acting β-agonists (SABAs) for acute asthma in a pediatric emergency department, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Socioeconomic Status in Children Tied to MetS in Adulthood

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Family socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood is associated with the risk for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and glucose abnormalities in adulthood, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in Diabetes Care.

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Heart Rate, BP in Male Teens Tied to Later Risk for Psych Disorders

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young men with a resting heart rate and blood pressure that are elevated -- but still within normal range -- appear more likely to develop a wide range of mental illnesses later in their lives, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Bariatric Surgery May Be Cost-Effective in Severely Obese Teens

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery not only helps severely obese teens lose weight, it may pay for itself in health care savings over time, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in JAMA Surgery.

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USPSTF Recommends Primary Care Breastfeeding Interventions

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that primary care interventions to promote breastfeeding can have a moderate net benefit. These findings form the basis of a final recommendation statement published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Disruptions in Brain Structure Seen in Children With PTSD

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The brains of children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have structural differences not seen in the brains of children without the disorder, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Radiology.

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Altered Brain Structure Seen With Just One Season of Youth Football

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Just one season of competitive football may cause changes in some young players' developing brains, even if they don't get a concussion during play, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Radiology.

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AAP Urges Parents to Develop Media Use Plan

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Parents need to work with their children to develop a media use plan for the entire family, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said in a set of new recommendations published online Oct. 20 in Pediatrics.

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CDC: Two Doses of HPV Vaccine Sufficient for Children Under 15

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children 14 and younger require only two doses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rather than the previously recommended three doses, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Neonatal Phototherapy Not Linked to Type 1 Diabetes

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal phototherapy is not associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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CDC Urges Dental Sealants for All Low-Income Children

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Treatments that seal a child's back teeth can prevent most cavities, but many children -- particularly those living in poverty -- don't get them, according to research published in the Oct. 18 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Treated Diabetic Retinopathy Rare in Children With T1DM

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Treated diabetic retinopathy (DR) is extremely rare among children with type 1 diabetes, according to research published online Oct. 7 in Diabetes Care.

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Researchers Find Antidepressant Bupropion Crosses Placenta

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In pregnant women taking the antidepressant bupropion, the drug and its active metabolites cross the placenta to the fetal circulation, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Urine Concentration Aids UTI Diagnosis in Young Infants

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For infants undergoing microscopic urinalysis as part of urinary tract infection (UTI) evaluation, urine concentration should be included in the interpretation, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Regulatory T Cells Decreased With Farm Exposure at Age 6

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- At age 6 years, regulatory T cells (Tregs) are decreased with farm exposure and increased among those with asthma, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Allergy.

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Adolescent BMI Predicts Diabetes Mellitus Mortality

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent body mass index (BMI) predicts diabetes mellitus (DM) mortality in midlife, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Lower Monthly Premiums for Narrow-Network Plans

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Narrow-network health insurance plans have lower monthly premiums than larger-network plans, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Late-Pregnancy Zika Infection Can Still Affect Fetal Brain

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus may harm a infant's brain even if the mother is infected just before giving birth, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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SSRI Use During Pregnancy Tied to Speech Issues in Offspring

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose mothers used a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) during pregnancy may be more likely to develop speech and language disorders, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Doctors Better Diagnosticians Than Symptom-Checker Programs

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are twice as likely to get the right diagnosis on the first try as 23 popular symptom-checking computer programs, according to a research letter published online Oct. 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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DEET to Protect Against Zika Appears Safe During Pregnancy

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) insect repellents won't harm a pregnant woman or her fetus when used as instructed to prevent Zika infection, according to research published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Gene Associated With Risk of Acute Otitis Media

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A potential genetic link to a child's higher risk of acute otitis media has been identified, according to research published online Sept. 28 in Nature Communications.

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Even Partial Antenatal Steroid Treatment Benefits Preemies

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Even partial steroid treatment before birth can improve survival odds for extremely premature infants and reduce their risk of certain birth defects, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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U.S. Health Care System Is One of the Least Efficient Worldwide

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is one of the least efficient worldwide based on a Bloomberg index that assesses life expectancy, health care spending per capita, and relative spending as a share of gross domestic product, according to a report published by Bloomberg.

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Daily Intranasal Steroid Tx Not Better for Allergy Relief

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Daily intranasal corticosteroids (INCS) are not superior to on-demand INCS or to antihistamine on demand for the treatment of pollen-related allergies in children, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Allergy.

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Unique Skin Phenotype for Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have a different skin phenotype from that of adult patients, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Strategies Presented for Managing Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Effective strategies for managing physician burnout include mindfulness and stress-management training, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet.

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Range of Perinatal Factors May Raise Risk for OCD in Offspring

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy behaviors and certain childbirth complications may influence a child's risk of developing obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), according to a study published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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CDC Reviews Measles Outbreak in Amish Community

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The measles outbreak that occurred in an Amish community in 2014 illustrates the ongoing threat the infection presents -- and the importance of routine vaccination, U.S. government researchers report in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Burns, Blast Injuries on the Rise From Exploding E-Cigarettes

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic-cigarette devices are randomly and unexpectedly exploding, burning and injuring people near them when they detonate, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Denver Clinic Boosts HPV Vaccination Rates

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The way to increase the number of girls and boys who get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine may be as simple as giving it as part of a routine bundle of vaccines, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Childhood Trauma Tied to Higher Odds of Shorter Telomeres

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who have experienced stress as children appear to have an increased risk of shorter telomeres, according to research published online Oct. 3 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Opioid Use Disorder, Heroin Use Up Among Young Adults

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults in the United States are more likely to become addicted to prescription opioids than they were in years past, and they're also more likely to use heroin, according to a study recently published online in Addictive Behaviors.

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Men With Zika Exposure to Abstain From Conceiving Longer

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released new recommendations on how long men with either Zika infection or exposure should abstain from trying to conceive. The recommendations have been published in the Sept. 30 early-release issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Doctors Spending in Excess of $32,000 on Health IT

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are spending more than $32,000 per year on health information technology (IT), according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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New AMA Module Helps Identify Physician Distress

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new resource has been developed to help physicians identify distressed colleagues and help them to access care, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Medication Adherence Stressful for Psoriasis Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adhering to medication regimens for the treatment of psoriasis can be an additional source of considerable emotional distress for patients, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Prevalence of Allergic Sensitization Increases With Age

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of allergic sensitization increases with age, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Allergy.

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