October 2016 Briefing - OBGYN & Women's Health

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for October 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Low and High HDL Tied to Increased Risk of Mortality

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low and high levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are linked to increased mortality risk, according to a study published in the Nov. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Diabetes-Related Distress Ups Risk for Rx Nonadherence

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes-related distress and depression symptom severity are risk factors for medication nonadherence in type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Diabetes Care.

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Initiation, Adherence to AIs Low for Older Women With DCIS

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For older women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), initiation of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) and adherence to treatment are low, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Cancer.

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Few Changes in Employer-Sponsored Insurance 2013-2014

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Private sector employer-sponsored health insurance offerings were similar in 2013 and 2014, with <3.5 percent of employers dropping coverage and 1.1 percent adding coverage, according to a report published online Oct. 26 in Health Affairs.

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Older, Younger Women Equally Benefit From Breast Recon

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older breast cancer patients who have undergone mastectomy benefit as much as younger women from breast reconstruction, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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Useful Tips Offered for Addressing Negative Patient Reviews

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an article published in Medical Economics, five tips are presented to address negative patient reviews.

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Education Needed Regarding Use of Herbal Weight Loss Products

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Health care professionals need education about the safety and effectiveness of weight loss medications, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in the Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research.

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Cancer Survivors Have Higher Rate of Antidepressant Use

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment for depression and anxiety is nearly twice as common among U.S. cancer survivors as it is for those with no history of cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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New ADA Guidelines Call for More Frequent Activity for DM Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with diabetes should do three or more minutes of light activity every 30 minutes during prolonged periods of sitting, such as working on a computer or watching television, according to the latest recommendations from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Searching for Price Info Affects Choice of Health Care Facility

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients searching for prices on imaging services and sleep studies choose health care facilities with lower prices, according to a research letter published online Oct. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Low CA Risk for Premenopausal Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding have low risk of endometrial cancer and atypical hyperplasia, according to a review published online Oct. 20 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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USPSTF Recommends Primary Care Breastfeeding Interventions

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that primary care interventions to promote breastfeeding can have a moderate net benefit. These findings form the basis of a final recommendation statement published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Women Catching Up With Men in Alcohol Consumption, Misuse

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women across the globe are now nearly as likely as men to drink and to engage in excessive, harmful drinking, according to a new study published online Oct. 24 in BMJ Open.

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ACOG: Water Immersion Not Recommended for Delivery

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While a birthing pool during the early stages of labor may offer some advantages, women should not deliver their infant in the water, according to a Committee Opinion published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Review: No Clear Link for Calcium Supplements, CVD

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Calcium supplements, taken within recommended levels, can be considered safe for the heart, according to new guidelines and an evidence review published online Oct. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Rx Subsidy Ups Persistence to Breast Cancer Hormone Therapy

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For white, black, and Hispanic women, receipt of a prescription subsidy is associated with improved persistence to breast cancer hormone therapy, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Recommendations for Secondary Prevention of Cervical Cancer

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a Clinical Practice Guideline published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Global Oncology, recommendations are presented for the secondary prevention of cervical cancer.

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More Than Half of Melanomas Are Self-Detected

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of melanomas are self-detected, and more melanomas are self-detected by women than men, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Risk of Stroke Appears to Be Up in Younger Pregnant Women

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy may raise the risk of stroke in younger women, when compared to their non-pregnant peers, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in JAMA Neurology.

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Smoking Still Responsible for Many U.S. Cancer Deaths

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one-third of cancer deaths among Americans aged 35 or older are caused by smoking, and the rate is much higher in the South, according to research published online Oct. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Resveratrol Doesn't Improve Insulin Sensitivity

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Resveratrol supplementation does not improve hepatic or peripheral insulin sensitivity among patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Diabetes Care.

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More Support for Health Benefits of Chocolate

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new analysis of existing studies, published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Nutrition, provides more support for the idea that cocoa in chocolate may provide some health benefits.

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Lead Poisoning Possible From Glazed Mexican Ceramics

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to high concentrations of lead -- often found in glazes that line traditional Mexican ceramics, cookware, and dishware -- can be toxic after extended periods of handling, according to a case report published online Oct. 17 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Bundled-Payment Program Deemed Better for Breast CA Care

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For breast cancer care, a bundled-payment program is associated with better adherence to quality indicators and better outcomes over time compared with a fee-for-service (FFS) program, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Oncology.

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Switching Diet Drinks for Water Benefits Overweight Women

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For overweight and obese women with type 2 diabetes, replacement of diet beverages (DBs) with water is associated with greater weight reduction and improvements in glucose metabolism, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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CDC: Two Doses of HPV Vaccine Sufficient for Children Under 15

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children 14 and younger require only two doses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rather than the previously recommended three doses, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Pregnancy Soon After Bariatric Surgery May Raise Risks

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Infants born to mothers who've had bariatric surgery have a higher risk for complications, and the risks are greatest for those born within two years of the surgery, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Surgery.

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Resveratrol Reduces Ovarian, Adrenal Androgens in PCOS

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), resveratrol is associated with significant reductions in ovarian and adrenal androgens, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Lower Bone Density Seen in Heavy Users of Cannabis

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy cannabis users have lower bone density compared to cigarette smokers, according to a new study published online Sept. 1 in The American Journal of Medicine.

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CDC: STD Rates at Unprecedented High in the United States

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sexually transmitted disease (STD) cases reached a record high in the United States in 2015, according to the annual Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Report released Oct. 19 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Financial Toxicity Is a Relevant Cancer Outcome Measure

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Financial toxicity is a clinically relevant outcome for patients receiving treatment for advanced cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Cancer.

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Researchers Find Antidepressant Bupropion Crosses Placenta

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In pregnant women taking the antidepressant bupropion, the drug and its active metabolites cross the placenta to the fetal circulation, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Less Frequent Cervical CA Screens May Be OK After HPV Vaccine

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women vaccinated with earlier versions of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine may only need cervical cancer screening every five years starting at age 25 or 30, and women who've received the updated vaccine need screening even less often, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Postprandial Walk Beneficial in Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, a short walk after eating may help lower blood glucose levels more than exercising at other times of the day, according to research published online Oct. 17 in Diabetologia.

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Herbal, Dietary Supplements Cause One-Fifth of Hepatotoxicity

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Herbal and dietary supplement (HDS)-induced liver injury accounts for 20 percent of cases of hepatotoxicity in the United States, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Hepatology.

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SHBG, Total Estradiol Linked to Type 2 Diabetes in Women

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and total estradiol (TE) are associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to research published online Oct. 10 in Diabetes.

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Considerable Economic Burden for Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For U.S. adults, the economic burden associated with vaccine-preventable diseases was estimated at about $9 billion in 2015, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Income Predicts Receipt of Weight-Loss Advice

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For overweight or obese individuals, income predicts receipt of weight-loss advice from health care providers, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Quality of Outpatient Care Has Not Consistently Improved in U.S.

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts to improve the quality of clinical care in the United States have had little impact on many aspects of outpatient care, according to an analysis published online Oct. 17 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Mutations Identified in Uterine, Ovarian Carcinosarcomas

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Carcinosarcomas (CSs) of the uterus and ovary have mutations in cancer genes previously identified in uterine and ovarian carcinomas and in genes encoding histones H2A and H2B, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Lower Monthly Premiums for Narrow-Network Plans

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Narrow-network health insurance plans have lower monthly premiums than larger-network plans, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Home-Based CBT Program for Sleep Feasible in Pregnancy

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A home-based cognitive-behavioral training program for sleep during late pregnancy is feasible and effective, according to a study published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Early Births Down With 17α-Hydroxyprogesterone Caproate

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women with a prior preterm birth, cerclage plus 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate is associated with a significant reduction in delivery at less than 24 weeks of gestation compared with cerclage alone, according to a study published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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New Active Zika Transmission Area in Miami-Dade County

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new active Zika transmission zone was declared Thursday by Florida health officials.

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Delayed Pushing Linked to Longer Second Stage of Labor

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For nulliparous women, delayed pushing is associated with longer second stage duration and increased odds of cesarean delivery and postpartum hemorrhage, according to a study published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Isolated From Semen

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first complete genome sequence of a sample of Zika virus derived from semen has been obtained, according to research published in the September/October issue of Genome Announcements.

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Downward Trend in U.S. Breast Cancer Mortality Continues

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The racial gap for breast cancer mortality is closing, particularly among younger women, according to research published in the Oct. 14 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Olympic Panel Says Strenuous Exercise Safe During Pregnancy

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Strenuous exercise during pregnancy doesn't appear to increase the risk of most pregnancy complications for mother or baby, a new report from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) says. The statement was published online Oct. 12 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Half of U.S. Women Expect to Have Child in the Future

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Fifty percent of U.S. women aged 15 to 44 years expect to have a child in the future, according to an October data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Late-Pregnancy Zika Infection Can Still Affect Fetal Brain

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus may harm a infant's brain even if the mother is infected just before giving birth, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Study Finds Mammograms Lead to High Rate of Overdiagnosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mammography screening is much more likely to find insignificant breast tumors than it is to catch potentially life-threatening cancer in its early stages, according to a study published in the Oct. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Second Trimester Lipids Can ID Gestational Diabetes

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early second trimester lipids can identify maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Diabetes Care.

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Ovarian Preservation Doesn't Impact Prognosis in Cervical CA

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women with early-stage cervical adenocarcinoma, ovarian preservation does not impact survival, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Acupuncture May Cut Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Half of women treated with acupuncture report a decline in the frequency of menopausal vasomotor symptoms (VMS), according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Menopause.

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Risk of Nephropathy From Radiocontrast Overestimated

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of radiocontrast-associated nephropathy may be overestimated, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Calcium Supplements May Be Detrimental to Heart Health

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary calcium in the form of supplements, but not calcium-rich foods, might have a harmful impact on the heart, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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SSRI Use During Pregnancy Tied to Speech Issues in Offspring

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose mothers used a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) during pregnancy may be more likely to develop speech and language disorders, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Cryoablation May Be Alternative to Breast Cancer Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cryoablation can successfully treat the majority of small breast cancers with few side effects or complications, according to a small study published recently in the Annals of Surgical Oncology.

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Doctors Better Diagnosticians Than Symptom-Checker Programs

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are twice as likely to get the right diagnosis on the first try as 23 popular symptom-checking computer programs, according to a research letter published online Oct. 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Costs of Chemo for Breast Cancer Vary Widely in the United States

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer chemotherapy costs can vary by tens of thousands of dollars in the United States, depending on the course of treatment doctors select, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Cancer.

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DEET to Protect Against Zika Appears Safe During Pregnancy

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) insect repellents won't harm a pregnant woman or her fetus when used as instructed to prevent Zika infection, according to research published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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High-Protein Diet Doesn't Improve Insulin Sensitivity

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal obese women who lose weight eating a high-protein diet may not experience any improvements in insulin sensitivity, according to a study published in the Oct. 11 issue of Cell Reports.

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Trends in Dietary Supplement Use Among U.S. Adults Changing

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of traditional multivitamins is decreasing among Americans, while supplements such as vitamin D, fish oil, and probiotics are becoming more popular, according to a study published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Exertion, Emotional Upset Can Trigger Myocardial Infarction

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intense anger or heavy physical exertion may be triggers for an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in some people, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Circulation.

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Copay Assist Programs Creating Problems in Health Care Markets

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Despite offering assistance to individuals who cannot afford expensive medications, copay assistance programs create broader problems in health care markets, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Oct. 11 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Even Partial Antenatal Steroid Treatment Benefits Preemies

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Even partial steroid treatment before birth can improve survival odds for extremely premature infants and reduce their risk of certain birth defects, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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U.S. Health Care System Is One of the Least Efficient Worldwide

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is one of the least efficient worldwide based on a Bloomberg index that assesses life expectancy, health care spending per capita, and relative spending as a share of gross domestic product, according to a report published by Bloomberg.

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Most Women Feel PCPs Are Involved in Breast Cancer Care

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Most women newly diagnosed with breast cancer perceive high primary care provider (PCP) quality, and report that their PCPs have high engagement and communication, according to research published online Oct. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Hospitalizations in Pregnancy, Delivery Stable for HIV-Infected

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 2004 to 2011 there was no increase in the number of hospitalizations during pregnancy and delivery for HIV-infected women, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Global Burden of Disease Report Evaluates the World's Health

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The United States lags behind other advanced nations when it comes to infant mortality and the life expectancy of its citizens, according to a comprehensive review of global health statistics published in the Oct. 8 issue of The Lancet.

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Strategies Presented for Managing Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Effective strategies for managing physician burnout include mindfulness and stress-management training, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet.

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Males Conceived Via ICSI May Have Sperm Abnormalities

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Males who were conceived using intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) may have lower sperm quantity and quality than those conceived naturally, according to research published online Oct. 5 in Human Reproduction.

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Range of Perinatal Factors May Raise Risk for OCD in Offspring

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy behaviors and certain childbirth complications may influence a child's risk of developing obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), according to a study published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Price Increases Larger for Older Cancer Drugs Than Newer Ones

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- After adjusting for inflation, nearly two-thirds of 86 cancer medications had price increases between 2010 and 2015, according to a research letter published online Oct. 6 in JAMA Oncology.

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Long-Term Tamoxifen Does Lower Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors does cut breast cancer patients' risk of developing cancer in their other breast, according to findings published online Oct. 6 in JAMA Oncology.

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Women's Better Memory Skills May Delay Alzheimer's Diagnosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in women may be more difficult than in men because older women tend to retain better verbal memory, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Neurology.

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Low Incidence of Cervical Cancer, CIN3+ for HPV-Negative Women

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV)-negative women have low long-term incidence of cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 or worse (CIN3+), which supports an extension of the cervical screening interval beyond five years for certain women, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in The BMJ.

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DEA Planning to Cut Production of Opioid Medication

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) says it has mandated significant cuts in the production of Schedule II opiate and opioid medication.

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More Evidence of Zika Connection to Guillain-Barré Syndrome

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a new report, published online Oct. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine, an international team of researchers says it has developed the strongest evidence to date that Zika virus can cause Guillain-Barré syndrome.

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Denver Clinic Boosts HPV Vaccination Rates

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The way to increase the number of girls and boys who get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine may be as simple as giving it as part of a routine bundle of vaccines, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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U.S. Smoking Rates Vary Across Counties Within States

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Parts of the Midwest and South have the highest smoking rates in the United States, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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No Evidence Activity Tracker Devices Raise Fitness Levels

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There's no evidence that fitness tracking devices raise activity levels enough to improve health, even with financial rewards, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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Depression Common in Patients With Chronic Angina

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Development of depression is common in patients with newly diagnosed chronic stable angina, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Delay in Post-Mastectomy Reconstruction May Fuel Anxiety

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Breast reconstruction immediately after breast removal surgery due to cancer may help reduce a patient's mental distress, according to a study published in the October issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Political Views May Influence Doctors' Advice, Decisions

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A doctor's political beliefs can sway their treatment decisions, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Botox, InterStim Compared in Female Urinary Incontinence

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women with refractory urgency urinary incontinence, onabotulinumtoxinA injections may help control leakage better than the implanted nerve stimulation device InterStim, according to a study published in the Oct. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Men With Zika Exposure to Abstain From Conceiving Longer

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released new recommendations on how long men with either Zika infection or exposure should abstain from trying to conceive. The recommendations have been published in the Sept. 30 early-release issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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CDC Updates Zika Travel Advisory for Southeast Asia

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has posted Zika virus-related special travel considerations for 11 Southeastern Asian countries.

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More Evidence for Benefit of Reduced Salt Intake on Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sodium intake has a direct relationship with total mortality, according to a report published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Doctors Spending in Excess of $32,000 on Health IT

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are spending more than $32,000 per year on health information technology (IT), according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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High Incidence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults have high incidence of cardiovascular risk factors, with increased incidence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia for blacks, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Summer Concentrations of 25OHD Predict Bone Mineral Density

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Summer levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25OHD) are associated with bone mineral density of the total hip, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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New AMA Module Helps Identify Physician Distress

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new resource has been developed to help physicians identify distressed colleagues and help them to access care, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Researchers Question Value of Web-Based Test for Prediabetes

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A simple, seven-question test for prediabetes may be needlessly sending millions of healthy Americans to their physicians for follow-up testing, according to a research letter published online Oct. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Medication Adherence Stressful for Psoriasis Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adhering to medication regimens for the treatment of psoriasis can be an additional source of considerable emotional distress for patients, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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