October 2016 Briefing - HIV & AIDS

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in HIV & AIDS for October 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Few Changes in Employer-Sponsored Insurance 2013-2014

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Private sector employer-sponsored health insurance offerings were similar in 2013 and 2014, with <3.5 percent of employers dropping coverage and 1.1 percent adding coverage, according to a report published online Oct. 26 in Health Affairs.

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Useful Tips Offered for Addressing Negative Patient Reviews

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an article published in Medical Economics, five tips are presented to address negative patient reviews.

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HIV Active in Tissues Even in Patients on Antiretrovirals

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients taking antiretroviral medications, HIV continues to reside in tissues, and though this may not cause AIDS, it could contribute to the development of unrelated conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Virology.

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New Research Maps Origins of HIV/AIDS in North America

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Using genetic analyses of 40-year-old blood samples, scientists have arrived at a clearer understanding of the introduction and spread of HIV in North America. The new genetic research was published online Oct. 26 in Nature.

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Adaptive Working Memory Training Beneficial in HIV

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adaptive working memory training (WMT), but not non-adaptive WMT, improves working memory performance in HIV participants and seronegative (SN) controls and reduces brain activation at one and six months, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Annals of Neurology.

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HBV, HCV Coinfection Ups Non-Hodgkin Risk in ART-Treated HIV

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic coinfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) among patients with HIV receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART), according to a study published online Oct. 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Lower Monthly Premiums for Narrow-Network Plans

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Narrow-network health insurance plans have lower monthly premiums than larger-network plans, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Copay Assist Programs Creating Problems in Health Care Markets

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Despite offering assistance to individuals who cannot afford expensive medications, copay assistance programs create broader problems in health care markets, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Oct. 11 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Not Enough Men Who Have Sex With Men Aware of PrEP

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many men who have sex with men (MSM) are not aware that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) medication can protect them from HIV, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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U.S. Health Care System Is One of the Least Efficient Worldwide

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is one of the least efficient worldwide based on a Bloomberg index that assesses life expectancy, health care spending per capita, and relative spending as a share of gross domestic product, according to a report published by Bloomberg.

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Hospitalizations in Pregnancy, Delivery Stable for HIV-Infected

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 2004 to 2011 there was no increase in the number of hospitalizations during pregnancy and delivery for HIV-infected women, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Strategies Presented for Managing Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Effective strategies for managing physician burnout include mindfulness and stress-management training, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet.

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Doctors Spending in Excess of $32,000 on Health IT

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are spending more than $32,000 per year on health information technology (IT), according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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New AMA Module Helps Identify Physician Distress

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new resource has been developed to help physicians identify distressed colleagues and help them to access care, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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