October 2016 Briefing - Geriatrics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Geriatrics for October 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Low and High HDL Tied to Increased Risk of Mortality

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low and high levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are linked to increased mortality risk, according to a study published in the Nov. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Too Few Seniors Addressing Advance Care Planning

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-quarter of American seniors have never discussed end-of-life care, according to a research letter published online Oct. 31 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Diabetes-Related Distress Ups Risk for Rx Nonadherence

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes-related distress and depression symptom severity are risk factors for medication nonadherence in type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Diabetes Care.

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Depressive Symptoms Linked to Functional Status in CAD

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with stable coronary artery disease, depressive symptoms and cardiac disease severity independently affect patient-reported functional status, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Questionnaire, Peak Flow Can ID Undiagnosed COPD

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A five-item questionnaire plus peak expiratory flow (PEF) can identify undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Few Changes in Employer-Sponsored Insurance 2013-2014

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Private sector employer-sponsored health insurance offerings were similar in 2013 and 2014, with <3.5 percent of employers dropping coverage and 1.1 percent adding coverage, according to a report published online Oct. 26 in Health Affairs.

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Useful Tips Offered for Addressing Negative Patient Reviews

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an article published in Medical Economics, five tips are presented to address negative patient reviews.

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Negligible Benefit for Oxygen in Patients With Mild COPD

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Oxygen therapy may not help patients in the less severe stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to research published in the Oct. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Resistance Training Beneficial in Mild Cognitive Impairment

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), high-intensity progressive resistance training (PRT) results in significant improvements in cognitive function, muscle strength, and aerobic capacity, with cognitive benefits mediated by strength gains, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Lower Costs for Pregabalin in Peripheral Neuropathic Pain

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP), the adjusted cost per patient is lower for treatment with pregabalin than gabapentin, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Rehospitalization After AMI Linked to Worse Health Status

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients after acute myocardial infarction, rehospitalization for unstable angina (UA) and unplanned revascularization during the first year are associated with worse health status, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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FDA Warns of Testosterone, AAS Abuse and Dependence

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Supplemental testosterone and related anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) can cause heart attacks, personality changes, and infertility, and are easily abused, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns, adding that labeling on all prescription testosterone products will be revised.

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Heart Failure Care Up, Regardless of Hospital Teaching Status

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to performance measures is similar at teaching hospitals (TH) and nonteaching hospitals (NTH), according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Statins Offset Insulin-Related Cancer Risk in T2DM

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), use of statins offsets insulin-related cancer risks, according to research published online Oct. 21 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Women Catching Up With Men in Alcohol Consumption, Misuse

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women across the globe are now nearly as likely as men to drink and to engage in excessive, harmful drinking, according to a new study published online Oct. 24 in BMJ Open.

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Review: No Clear Link for Calcium Supplements, CVD

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Calcium supplements, taken within recommended levels, can be considered safe for the heart, according to new guidelines and an evidence review published online Oct. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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More Than Half of Melanomas Are Self-Detected

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of melanomas are self-detected, and more melanomas are self-detected by women than men, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Guidance for Coronary Patients With ASA/NSAID Sensitivity

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable chronic ischemic heart disease (CIHD) and histories of nonsevere hypersensitivity reactions to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), an ASA challenge is recommended, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Allergy.

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Continued 2 Percent Daily Testosterone Safe, Effective

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Once-daily testosterone solution 2 percent (T-sol) is safe and improves sex drive and energy in men with androgen deficiency, according to a study published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

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More Support for Health Benefits of Chocolate

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new analysis of existing studies, published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Nutrition, provides more support for the idea that cocoa in chocolate may provide some health benefits.

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Surgeon Experience Influences Post-Op Mobilization Orders

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patient characteristics and surgeon factors influence surgeons' postoperative weight-bearing orders after hip fracture repair, according to research published online Oct. 6 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Higher Grade Disease at Prostatectomy With Surveillance

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For men with low-risk prostate cancer, those who enter active surveillance have higher grade of disease at prostatectomy, but no difference in other adverse pathological outcomes, compared to those undergoing immediate surgery, according to a study published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Cardiac Rehabilitation Does Not Up Health Status After AMI

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Participation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) does not improve reported health status during the year following acute myocardial infarction (AMI); however, participation in CR does confer a significant survival benefit, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Lead Poisoning Possible From Glazed Mexican Ceramics

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to high concentrations of lead -- often found in glazes that line traditional Mexican ceramics, cookware, and dishware -- can be toxic after extended periods of handling, according to a case report published online Oct. 17 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Switching Diet Drinks for Water Benefits Overweight Women

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For overweight and obese women with type 2 diabetes, replacement of diet beverages (DBs) with water is associated with greater weight reduction and improvements in glucose metabolism, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Surveillance Rates on Rise in Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than 90 percent of men in Sweden who have very low-risk prostate cancer choose close monitoring rather than immediate treatment -- and more American men should use that option, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in JAMA Oncology.

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Pulmonary Embolism May Be Cause of Syncope in Some Elderly

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- About one of every six patients hospitalized for a first episode of syncope has a pulmonary embolism, according to a study published in the Oct. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Barriers for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Vary

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients and health care providers have markedly divergent perceptions of barriers to diabetic retinopathy screening, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Angina Pectoris Linked to Worse HRQoL in Heart Failure

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, angina pectoris (AP) is associated with worse health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and depressive symptoms, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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New Method May Provide Better Rx for Seniors' Ankle Fractures

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of plaster cast might help older adults avoid surgery for unstable ankle fractures, according to research published in the Oct. 11 issue the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Financial Toxicity Is a Relevant Cancer Outcome Measure

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Financial toxicity is a clinically relevant outcome for patients receiving treatment for advanced cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Cancer.

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Researchers Say Not All A-Fib Patients Need Anticoagulation

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients with atrial fibrillation who have implanted pacemakers or defibrillators may not always need anticoagulation, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Circulation.

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Postprandial Walk Beneficial in Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, a short walk after eating may help lower blood glucose levels more than exercising at other times of the day, according to research published online Oct. 17 in Diabetologia.

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AHA Urges Awareness of Statin Interaction With Other CV Meds

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Statins can interact with other drugs prescribed for cardiovascular disease, but there are ways to navigate the issue, according to new recommendations from the American Heart Association published online Oct. 17 in Circulation.

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Herbal, Dietary Supplements Cause One-Fifth of Hepatotoxicity

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Herbal and dietary supplement (HDS)-induced liver injury accounts for 20 percent of cases of hepatotoxicity in the United States, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Hepatology.

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Arrhythmias Not Induced by Caffeine in Heart Failure Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Caffeine doesn't appear to increase the risk of arrhythmias in patients with heart failure, according to research published online Oct. 17 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Quality of Outpatient Care Has Not Consistently Improved in U.S.

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts to improve the quality of clinical care in the United States have had little impact on many aspects of outpatient care, according to an analysis published online Oct. 17 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Outcomes Up for Seniors With Hip Fx in Large Teaching Hospitals

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors with hip fractures may be more likely to die if they're treated in smaller community hospitals than in large teaching hospitals, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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New Recs for RBC Transfusion, Optimal RBC Storage Length

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a clinical practice guideline published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, recommendations are presented for the target hemoglobin level for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and optimal duration of RBC storage.

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CDC: Complementary Health Use Up With Musculoskeletal Pain

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of complementary health approaches is significantly higher for U.S. adults with musculoskeletal pain disorders, according to a report published online Oct. 12 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health Statistics Reports.

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Lower Monthly Premiums for Narrow-Network Plans

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Narrow-network health insurance plans have lower monthly premiums than larger-network plans, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Data Mining, Experiments ID QT Prolonging Drug Interactions

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Data mining coupled with laboratory experiments can identify QT interval-prolonging drug-drug interactions (QT-DDIs), according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Androgen Deprivation Therapy May Raise Dementia Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of dementia might be doubled for prostate cancer patients who are treated with androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), according to a study published online Oct. 13 in JAMA Oncology.

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Current Election Causing Americans Significant Stress

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. presidential election has caused stress for more than half of American adults, regardless of party affiliation, according to a survey conducted by the American Psychological Association.

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Inhaled Levodopa May Rapidly Relieve Parkinson's Symptoms

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An inhaled version of the Parkinson's drug levodopa can help when patients experience symptoms between doses of the pill form of the medication, according to a study published in the Oct. 12 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Low Diastolic Pressure Linked to Subclinical Myocardial Damage

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low diastolic blood pressure (DBP) seems to be associated with subclinical myocardial damage, according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Computerized Ordering Tool Cuts Imaging Cardiac Stress Tests

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A computerized order entry tool can increase the use of nonimaging cardiac stress tests among hospitalized patients, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Risk of Nephropathy From Radiocontrast Overestimated

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of radiocontrast-associated nephropathy may be overestimated, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Calcium Supplements May Be Detrimental to Heart Health

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary calcium in the form of supplements, but not calcium-rich foods, might have a harmful impact on the heart, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Doctors Better Diagnosticians Than Symptom-Checker Programs

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are twice as likely to get the right diagnosis on the first try as 23 popular symptom-checking computer programs, according to a research letter published online Oct. 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Volunteering May Help Prevent Cognitive Impairment in Seniors

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who volunteer have lower risk of developing cognitive impairment, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Low HDL-C, High TG Increase Risk for Diabetic Kidney Disease

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetes, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and high triglyceride (TG) levels are associated with increased risk of diabetic kidney disease (defined as low estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], an eGFR reduction >30 percent, and/or albuminuria), according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Diabetes Care.

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Late Mortality Mainly Noncardiac for TAVR Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), late mortality is mainly related to noncardiac causes, according to research published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Orthostatic Hypotension May Increase Risk of Dementia

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is an association between orthostatic hypotension and an increased risk for dementia, according to a new study published online Oct. 11 in PLOS Medicine.

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Trends in Dietary Supplement Use Among U.S. Adults Changing

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of traditional multivitamins is decreasing among Americans, while supplements such as vitamin D, fish oil, and probiotics are becoming more popular, according to a study published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Midlife Hypertension Appears Detrimental to Cognitive Function

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Midlife hypertension may increase risk for dementia later in life, according to a new scientific statement published online Oct. 10 in Hypertension.

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CDI Risk Up When Prior Occupant of Hospital Bed Got Antibiotics

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When a hospital patient is taking antibiotics, the next patient to use the same bed may face an elevated risk of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), according to a study published online Oct. 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Exertion, Emotional Upset Can Trigger Myocardial Infarction

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intense anger or heavy physical exertion may be triggers for an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in some people, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Circulation.

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Copay Assist Programs Creating Problems in Health Care Markets

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Despite offering assistance to individuals who cannot afford expensive medications, copay assistance programs create broader problems in health care markets, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Oct. 11 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Geriatric Scholars Program Benefits Most Participants

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Veterans Affairs Geriatric Scholars Program (GSP), which utilizes a blended program educational format, improves clinical practices, and most participants report improved job satisfaction, according to research published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Ventilators May Be Overused Among Dementia Patients in ICUs

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There has been an increase in the use of mechanical ventilation over time without substantial improvement in survival among hospitalized nursing home residents with advanced dementia, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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U.S. Health Care System Is One of the Least Efficient Worldwide

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is one of the least efficient worldwide based on a Bloomberg index that assesses life expectancy, health care spending per capita, and relative spending as a share of gross domestic product, according to a report published by Bloomberg.

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Ghrelin May Predict Cognitive Impairment

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Blood levels of ghrelin may be a predictor of executive function impairment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

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Strategies Presented for Managing Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Effective strategies for managing physician burnout include mindfulness and stress-management training, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet.

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Global Burden of Disease Report Evaluates the World's Health

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The United States lags behind other advanced nations when it comes to infant mortality and the life expectancy of its citizens, according to a comprehensive review of global health statistics published in the Oct. 8 issue of The Lancet.

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Hospital Choice Key in Post-Myocardial Infarction Survival

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients with myocardial infarction (MI) who receive immediate high-quality care from their hospital often receive a long-term survival advantage, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Frailty Under-Recognized in Older Thoracic Surgery Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Frailty often goes unrecognized in older thoracic surgery patients, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Variation in Medicare Payments for Peri-Op Complications

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing four selected inpatient operations, there is considerable variation across hospitals in Medicare payments for those rescued from perioperative complications, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Surgery.

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Women's Better Memory Skills May Delay Alzheimer's Diagnosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in women may be more difficult than in men because older women tend to retain better verbal memory, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Neurology.

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DEA Planning to Cut Production of Opioid Medication

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) says it has mandated significant cuts in the production of Schedule II opiate and opioid medication.

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Burden of Cirrhosis, Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure Increasing

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 2001 to 2011 there was a considerable increase in the burden of cirrhosis and acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), according to research published online Oct. 3 in Hepatology.

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Scientists Claim Limit to Human Life Span Has Been Reached

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The average maximum human life span is 115 years, and the absolute limit of human life span will be 125 years, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Nature.

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Depression Common in Patients With Chronic Angina

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Development of depression is common in patients with newly diagnosed chronic stable angina, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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More Evidence for Benefit of Reduced Salt Intake on Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sodium intake has a direct relationship with total mortality, according to a report published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Patient Satisfaction Up With Pharmacist-Managed Warfarin Tx

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pharmacist-managed warfarin anticoagulation therapy is associated with improved patient satisfaction, although the benefits in terms of control, safety, and mortality are unclear, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Doctors Spending in Excess of $32,000 on Health IT

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are spending more than $32,000 per year on health information technology (IT), according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Summer Concentrations of 25OHD Predict Bone Mineral Density

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Summer levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25OHD) are associated with bone mineral density of the total hip, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Absent Pulses Up Risk of Major Vascular Outcomes in T2DM

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, absent dorsalis pedis and/or posterior tibial pulses are associated with increased risk of major vascular outcomes, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in Diabetes Care.

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High Incidence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults have high incidence of cardiovascular risk factors, with increased incidence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia for blacks, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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New AMA Module Helps Identify Physician Distress

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new resource has been developed to help physicians identify distressed colleagues and help them to access care, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Researchers Question Value of Web-Based Test for Prediabetes

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A simple, seven-question test for prediabetes may be needlessly sending millions of healthy Americans to their physicians for follow-up testing, according to a research letter published online Oct. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Higher Bleeding Risk Seen With Rivaroxaban Versus Dabigatran

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Rivaroxaban may pose a slightly greater risk of serious bleeding than dabigatran in patients with atrial fibrillation, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Novel Proactive Model Identifies Falls, Syncope, Dizziness

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A novel proactive multidisciplinary service model can identify falls, syncope, and dizziness symptoms, and reveal new diagnoses, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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