October 2016 Briefing - Gastroenterology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for October 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Few Changes in Employer-Sponsored Insurance 2013-2014

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Private sector employer-sponsored health insurance offerings were similar in 2013 and 2014, with <3.5 percent of employers dropping coverage and 1.1 percent adding coverage, according to a report published online Oct. 26 in Health Affairs.

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Timely Antibiotic Administration Cuts Death in Cirrhosis, UGIB

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Timely administration of antibiotics is associated with a reduction in mortality among patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), according to a study published in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Epithelial Thickness Is Marker for Gastroesophageal Reflux

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Epithelial thickness seems to be a marker for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to research published in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Useful Tips Offered for Addressing Negative Patient Reviews

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an article published in Medical Economics, five tips are presented to address negative patient reviews.

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Review: Reduced Risk of Death for Left-Sided Colon Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The side of origin of colon cancer (CC) impacts prognosis, with reduced risk of death for left-sided CC (LCC), according to a review published online Oct. 27 in JAMA Oncology.

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Women Catching Up With Men in Alcohol Consumption, Misuse

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women across the globe are now nearly as likely as men to drink and to engage in excessive, harmful drinking, according to a new study published online Oct. 24 in BMJ Open.

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Advantages of FIT As CRC Screening Method Discussed

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) has advantages as a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening method, and should be a component of a screening program, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Oct. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Men With Genetic Risk of CRC May Lower Risk Via Healthy Lifestyle

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy living can lower the odds for colorectal cancer (CRC) for men who are at high genetic risk for the disease, according to research published online recently in Genetics in Medicine.

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Pregnancy Soon After Bariatric Surgery May Raise Risks

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Infants born to mothers who've had bariatric surgery have a higher risk for complications, and the risks are greatest for those born within two years of the surgery, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Surgery.

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Prevalence of Employment Does Not Change Post Bariatric Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients undergoing bariatric surgery maintain their employment status and have reduced prevalence of presenteeism after surgery, according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Financial Toxicity Is a Relevant Cancer Outcome Measure

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Financial toxicity is a clinically relevant outcome for patients receiving treatment for advanced cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Cancer.

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Herbal, Dietary Supplements Cause One-Fifth of Hepatotoxicity

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Herbal and dietary supplement (HDS)-induced liver injury accounts for 20 percent of cases of hepatotoxicity in the United States, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Hepatology.

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HBV, HCV Coinfection Ups Non-Hodgkin Risk in ART-Treated HIV

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic coinfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) among patients with HIV receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART), according to a study published online Oct. 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Liver Stiffness Linked to Hepatic Events, Death in Hepatitis B

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), liver stiffness measurement (LSM) is associated with hepatic events and death, while metabolic syndrome increases the risk of cardiovascular events, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in Hepatology.

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Lower Monthly Premiums for Narrow-Network Plans

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Narrow-network health insurance plans have lower monthly premiums than larger-network plans, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Data Mining, Experiments ID QT Prolonging Drug Interactions

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Data mining coupled with laboratory experiments can identify QT interval-prolonging drug-drug interactions (QT-DDIs), according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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High BMI, Large Waist, T2DM Tied to Increased Odds of Liver Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Having a large waistline, a high body mass index (BMI), and type 2 diabetes may raise risk for liver cancer, according to research published online Oct. 14 in Cancer Research.

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Two Genetic Subtypes of Crohn's Disease Identified

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Crohn's disease appears to have at least two distinct genetic subtypes, which could explain why the condition is so hard to treat, according to research published online Oct. 14 in Gut.

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Obesity Ups Risk for Secondary Primary Cancers in Men

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity before a cancer diagnosis is associated with an increased risk for overall and individual secondary primary cancers (SPCs) in males, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Doctors Better Diagnosticians Than Symptom-Checker Programs

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are twice as likely to get the right diagnosis on the first try as 23 popular symptom-checking computer programs, according to a research letter published online Oct. 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Copay Assist Programs Creating Problems in Health Care Markets

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Despite offering assistance to individuals who cannot afford expensive medications, copay assistance programs create broader problems in health care markets, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Oct. 11 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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CDI Risk Up When Prior Occupant of Hospital Bed Got Antibiotics

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When a hospital patient is taking antibiotics, the next patient to use the same bed may face an elevated risk of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), according to a study published online Oct. 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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U.S. Health Care System Is One of the Least Efficient Worldwide

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is one of the least efficient worldwide based on a Bloomberg index that assesses life expectancy, health care spending per capita, and relative spending as a share of gross domestic product, according to a report published by Bloomberg.

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Strategies Presented for Managing Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Effective strategies for managing physician burnout include mindfulness and stress-management training, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet.

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Price Increases Larger for Older Cancer Drugs Than Newer Ones

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- After adjusting for inflation, nearly two-thirds of 86 cancer medications had price increases between 2010 and 2015, according to a research letter published online Oct. 6 in JAMA Oncology.

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Zinc Alters Gut Microbiota, Cuts Resistance to C. difficile

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary zinc (Zn) alters the gut microbiota and affects resistance to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), according to research published online Sept. 26 in Nature Medicine.

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Variation in Medicare Payments for Peri-Op Complications

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing four selected inpatient operations, there is considerable variation across hospitals in Medicare payments for those rescued from perioperative complications, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Surgery.

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Burden of Cirrhosis, Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure Increasing

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 2001 to 2011 there was a considerable increase in the burden of cirrhosis and acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), according to research published online Oct. 3 in Hepatology.

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NASH ID'd by Mass Spectrometry-Based Profiling, Clinical Variables

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mass spectrometry (MS)-based profiling combined with clinical variables can identify nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), according to a study published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Distinct Duodenal Bacteria in Celiac Disease, Controls

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Duodenal bacteria from patients with celiac disease (CD) and healthy individuals have distinct effects on gluten breakdown and immunogenicity, according to a study published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

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Biologics Tied to Opportunistic Infection Risk in IBD

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), biologic agents increase the risk of infection, especially opportunistic infection, but do not increase the risk of serious infection or malignancy, according to a review published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Doctors Spending in Excess of $32,000 on Health IT

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are spending more than $32,000 per year on health information technology (IT), according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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New AMA Module Helps Identify Physician Distress

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new resource has been developed to help physicians identify distressed colleagues and help them to access care, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Physical Activity Reduces Intrahepatic Lipid Content

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and underlying metabolic disorders, physical activity is associated with a reduction in intrahepatic lipid content and markers of hepatocellular injury, according to a meta-analysis published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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CT Colonography May Be Useful for Aneurysm Detection

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Routine assessment of the aorta during a computed tomography colonography (CTC) may aid in aneurysm detection, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology.

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2 mg/kg/day Azathioprine Best for Crohn's in Chinese Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For Chinese patients with Crohn's disease (CD), 2 mg/kg/day azathioprine (AZA) seems more effective than 1 mg/kg/day, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Digestive Diseases.

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