October 2016 Briefing - Family Practice

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for October 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Clean Indoor Environment Can Help Keep Asthma in Check

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing indoor allergens and pollutants can help control children's asthma, reducing their need for medication, according to a report from the American Academy of Pediatrics published online Oct. 31 in Pediatrics.

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Opioid Poisonings in Children, Teens Rising Dramatically

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The number of young children and teens hospitalized for overdosing on opioids has increased nearly two-fold in recent years, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Low and High HDL Tied to Increased Risk of Mortality

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low and high levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are linked to increased mortality risk, according to a study published in the Nov. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Too Few Seniors Addressing Advance Care Planning

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-quarter of American seniors have never discussed end-of-life care, according to a research letter published online Oct. 31 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Guidelines Presented for Fluoroquinolone Use in Children

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a clinical report published online Oct. 31 in Pediatrics, guidelines are presented for the use of systemic and topical fluoroquinolones in children.

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Depressive Symptoms Linked to Functional Status in CAD

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with stable coronary artery disease, depressive symptoms and cardiac disease severity independently affect patient-reported functional status, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Questionnaire, Peak Flow Can ID Undiagnosed COPD

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A five-item questionnaire plus peak expiratory flow (PEF) can identify undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Few Changes in Employer-Sponsored Insurance 2013-2014

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Private sector employer-sponsored health insurance offerings were similar in 2013 and 2014, with <3.5 percent of employers dropping coverage and 1.1 percent adding coverage, according to a report published online Oct. 26 in Health Affairs.

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Diabetes-Related Distress Ups Risk for Rx Nonadherence

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes-related distress and depression symptom severity are risk factors for medication nonadherence in type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Diabetes Care.

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Skin Patch to Treat Peanut Allergy Appears Promising

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A skin patch that delivers small amounts of peanut protein may help treat children and young adults with peanut allergy, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Male Contraceptive Effective, but Side Effects Problematic

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A contraceptive injection for men shows some promise, but researchers are still struggling to improve its effectiveness and deal with severe side effects caused by the injections, according to a study published online Oct. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Eating Reassessment Urged After Negative Oral Food Challenge

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For children with a negative oral food challenge (OFC), there is a correlation between consumption of reintroduced food with the child's interest in tasting new foods before and after the challenge, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in Allergy.

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Useful Tips Offered for Addressing Negative Patient Reviews

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an article published in Medical Economics, five tips are presented to address negative patient reviews.

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Education Needed Regarding Use of Herbal Weight Loss Products

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Health care professionals need education about the safety and effectiveness of weight loss medications, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in the Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research.

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Cardiometabolic Syndrome Ups Subclinical Atherosclerosis Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS) is associated with increased risk of subclinical atherosclerosis, but the risk is attenuated by high fitness, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Review: Reduced Risk of Death for Left-Sided Colon Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The side of origin of colon cancer (CC) impacts prognosis, with reduced risk of death for left-sided CC (LCC), according to a review published online Oct. 27 in JAMA Oncology.

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Negligible Benefit for Oxygen in Patients With Mild COPD

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Oxygen therapy may not help patients in the less severe stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to research published in the Oct. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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HIV Active in Tissues Even in Patients on Antiretrovirals

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients taking antiretroviral medications, HIV continues to reside in tissues, and though this may not cause AIDS, it could contribute to the development of unrelated conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Virology.

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Resistance Training Beneficial in Mild Cognitive Impairment

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), high-intensity progressive resistance training (PRT) results in significant improvements in cognitive function, muscle strength, and aerobic capacity, with cognitive benefits mediated by strength gains, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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New ADA Guidelines Call for More Frequent Activity for DM Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with diabetes should do three or more minutes of light activity every 30 minutes during prolonged periods of sitting, such as working on a computer or watching television, according to the latest recommendations from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Cancer Survivors Have Higher Rate of Antidepressant Use

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment for depression and anxiety is nearly twice as common among U.S. cancer survivors as it is for those with no history of cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Quality Improvement Methods Improve Asthma Care

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of quality improvement (QI) methods can improve timely administration of short-acting β-agonists (SABAs) for acute asthma in a pediatric emergency department, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Lower Costs for Pregabalin in Peripheral Neuropathic Pain

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP), the adjusted cost per patient is lower for treatment with pregabalin than gabapentin, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Child-Parent Screening for Hypercholesterolemia Feasible

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for hypercholesterolemia is feasible at routine child immunization visits in primary care practices, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Socioeconomic Status in Children Tied to MetS in Adulthood

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Family socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood is associated with the risk for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and glucose abnormalities in adulthood, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in Diabetes Care.

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Rehospitalization After AMI Linked to Worse Health Status

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients after acute myocardial infarction, rehospitalization for unstable angina (UA) and unplanned revascularization during the first year are associated with worse health status, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Heart Rate, BP in Male Teens Tied to Later Risk for Psych Disorders

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young men with a resting heart rate and blood pressure that are elevated -- but still within normal range -- appear more likely to develop a wide range of mental illnesses later in their lives, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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New Research Maps Origins of HIV/AIDS in North America

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Using genetic analyses of 40-year-old blood samples, scientists have arrived at a clearer understanding of the introduction and spread of HIV in North America. The new genetic research was published online Oct. 26 in Nature.

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Bariatric Surgery May Be Cost-Effective in Severely Obese Teens

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery not only helps severely obese teens lose weight, it may pay for itself in health care savings over time, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in JAMA Surgery.

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FDA Warns of Testosterone, AAS Abuse and Dependence

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Supplemental testosterone and related anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) can cause heart attacks, personality changes, and infertility, and are easily abused, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns, adding that labeling on all prescription testosterone products will be revised.

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Searching for Price Info Affects Choice of Health Care Facility

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients searching for prices on imaging services and sleep studies choose health care facilities with lower prices, according to a research letter published online Oct. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Ratio of ω-6:ω-3 Fatty Acids Implicated in Obesity

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Governments and international organizations should focus on redressing the balance of ω-6 and ω-3 fatty acids in order to address obesity, according to an editorial published in the September issue of Open Heart.

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Low CA Risk for Premenopausal Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding have low risk of endometrial cancer and atypical hyperplasia, according to a review published online Oct. 20 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Antioxidant, Carotene Intake Tied to Increased Function in ALS

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antioxidants, carotenes, and fruit and vegetable intake is associated with higher amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) function, according to research published online Oct. 24 in JAMA Neurology.

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Heart Failure Care Up, Regardless of Hospital Teaching Status

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to performance measures is similar at teaching hospitals (TH) and nonteaching hospitals (NTH), according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Statins Offset Insulin-Related Cancer Risk in T2DM

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), use of statins offsets insulin-related cancer risks, according to research published online Oct. 21 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Even Young Blood Vessels Can Be Damaged by Air Pollution

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Even young, healthy adults can suffer endothelial injury from air pollution, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Circulation Research.

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Women Catching Up With Men in Alcohol Consumption, Misuse

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women across the globe are now nearly as likely as men to drink and to engage in excessive, harmful drinking, according to a new study published online Oct. 24 in BMJ Open.

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ACOG: Water Immersion Not Recommended for Delivery

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While a birthing pool during the early stages of labor may offer some advantages, women should not deliver their infant in the water, according to a Committee Opinion published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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USPSTF Recommends Primary Care Breastfeeding Interventions

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that primary care interventions to promote breastfeeding can have a moderate net benefit. These findings form the basis of a final recommendation statement published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Review: No Clear Link for Calcium Supplements, CVD

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Calcium supplements, taken within recommended levels, can be considered safe for the heart, according to new guidelines and an evidence review published online Oct. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Liraglutide Increases Heart Rate in T2DM With Stable CAD

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Liraglutide increases heart rate (HR) and reduces heart rate variability (HRV) in overweight patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D) and stable coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Diabetes Care.

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Advantages of FIT As CRC Screening Method Discussed

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) has advantages as a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening method, and should be a component of a screening program, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Oct. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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More Than Half of Melanomas Are Self-Detected

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of melanomas are self-detected, and more melanomas are self-detected by women than men, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Risk of Stroke Appears to Be Up in Younger Pregnant Women

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy may raise the risk of stroke in younger women, when compared to their non-pregnant peers, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in JAMA Neurology.

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Recommendations for Secondary Prevention of Cervical Cancer

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a Clinical Practice Guideline published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Global Oncology, recommendations are presented for the secondary prevention of cervical cancer.

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Saxagliptin Linked to Improved Albumin/Creatinine Ratios

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, saxagliptin is associated with improvement in the albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR), according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Diabetes Care.

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Altered Brain Structure Seen With Just One Season of Youth Football

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Just one season of competitive football may cause changes in some young players' developing brains, even if they don't get a concussion during play, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Radiology.

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Smoking Still Responsible for Many U.S. Cancer Deaths

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one-third of cancer deaths among Americans aged 35 or older are caused by smoking, and the rate is much higher in the South, according to research published online Oct. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Adaptive Working Memory Training Beneficial in HIV

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adaptive working memory training (WMT), but not non-adaptive WMT, improves working memory performance in HIV participants and seronegative (SN) controls and reduces brain activation at one and six months, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Continued 2 Percent Daily Testosterone Safe, Effective

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Once-daily testosterone solution 2 percent (T-sol) is safe and improves sex drive and energy in men with androgen deficiency, according to a study published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Guidance for Coronary Patients With ASA/NSAID Sensitivity

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable chronic ischemic heart disease (CIHD) and histories of nonsevere hypersensitivity reactions to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), an ASA challenge is recommended, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Allergy.

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Resveratrol Doesn't Improve Insulin Sensitivity

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Resveratrol supplementation does not improve hepatic or peripheral insulin sensitivity among patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Diabetes Care.

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Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Deaths Down 1999 to 2014

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 1999 to 2014 the numbers of deaths, both accidental and intentional, due to carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning significantly declined in the United States, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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AAP Urges Parents to Develop Media Use Plan

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Parents need to work with their children to develop a media use plan for the entire family, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said in a set of new recommendations published online Oct. 20 in Pediatrics.

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More Support for Health Benefits of Chocolate

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new analysis of existing studies, published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Nutrition, provides more support for the idea that cocoa in chocolate may provide some health benefits.

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Lead Poisoning Possible From Glazed Mexican Ceramics

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to high concentrations of lead -- often found in glazes that line traditional Mexican ceramics, cookware, and dishware -- can be toxic after extended periods of handling, according to a case report published online Oct. 17 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Cardiac Rehabilitation Does Not Up Health Status After AMI

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Participation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) does not improve reported health status during the year following acute myocardial infarction (AMI); however, participation in CR does confer a significant survival benefit, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Higher Grade Disease at Prostatectomy With Surveillance

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For men with low-risk prostate cancer, those who enter active surveillance have higher grade of disease at prostatectomy, but no difference in other adverse pathological outcomes, compared to those undergoing immediate surgery, according to a study published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Switching Diet Drinks for Water Benefits Overweight Women

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For overweight and obese women with type 2 diabetes, replacement of diet beverages (DBs) with water is associated with greater weight reduction and improvements in glucose metabolism, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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CDC: Two Doses of HPV Vaccine Sufficient for Children Under 15

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children 14 and younger require only two doses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rather than the previously recommended three doses, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Surveillance Rates on Rise in Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than 90 percent of men in Sweden who have very low-risk prostate cancer choose close monitoring rather than immediate treatment -- and more American men should use that option, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in JAMA Oncology.

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Pregnancy Soon After Bariatric Surgery May Raise Risks

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Infants born to mothers who've had bariatric surgery have a higher risk for complications, and the risks are greatest for those born within two years of the surgery, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Surgery.

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Pulmonary Embolism May Be Cause of Syncope in Some Elderly

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- About one of every six patients hospitalized for a first episode of syncope has a pulmonary embolism, according to a study published in the Oct. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Neonatal Phototherapy Not Linked to Type 1 Diabetes

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal phototherapy is not associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Resveratrol Reduces Ovarian, Adrenal Androgens in PCOS

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), resveratrol is associated with significant reductions in ovarian and adrenal androgens, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Lower Bone Density Seen in Heavy Users of Cannabis

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy cannabis users have lower bone density compared to cigarette smokers, according to a new study published online Sept. 1 in The American Journal of Medicine.

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Barriers for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Vary

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients and health care providers have markedly divergent perceptions of barriers to diabetic retinopathy screening, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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CPAP Improves Asthma Control, QoL for Adults With Asthma, OSA

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with asthma and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is associated with improved asthma control, quality of life, and lung function, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Allergy.

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Angina Pectoris Linked to Worse HRQoL in Heart Failure

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, angina pectoris (AP) is associated with worse health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and depressive symptoms, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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CDC: STD Rates at Unprecedented High in the United States

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sexually transmitted disease (STD) cases reached a record high in the United States in 2015, according to the annual Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Report released Oct. 19 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Certain Factors Predict Repeat ER Visits for Ureteral Stones

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with ureteral stones, those who are younger, have proximal stones, and require intravenous narcotics for pain control are more likely to return to the emergency department within 30 days, according to a study published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

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CDC Urges Dental Sealants for All Low-Income Children

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Treatments that seal a child's back teeth can prevent most cavities, but many children -- particularly those living in poverty -- don't get them, according to research published in the Oct. 18 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Treated Diabetic Retinopathy Rare in Children With T1DM

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Treated diabetic retinopathy (DR) is extremely rare among children with type 1 diabetes, according to research published online Oct. 7 in Diabetes Care.

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Considerable Absenteeism Costs for Chronic Disease, Risk Factors

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Considerable costs are associated with absenteeism related to chronic diseases and health risk factors, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Financial Toxicity Is a Relevant Cancer Outcome Measure

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Financial toxicity is a clinically relevant outcome for patients receiving treatment for advanced cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Cancer.

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Researchers Find Antidepressant Bupropion Crosses Placenta

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In pregnant women taking the antidepressant bupropion, the drug and its active metabolites cross the placenta to the fetal circulation, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Urine Concentration Aids UTI Diagnosis in Young Infants

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For infants undergoing microscopic urinalysis as part of urinary tract infection (UTI) evaluation, urine concentration should be included in the interpretation, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Postprandial Walk Beneficial in Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, a short walk after eating may help lower blood glucose levels more than exercising at other times of the day, according to research published online Oct. 17 in Diabetologia.

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Researchers Say Not All A-Fib Patients Need Anticoagulation

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients with atrial fibrillation who have implanted pacemakers or defibrillators may not always need anticoagulation, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Circulation.

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Less Frequent Cervical CA Screens May Be OK After HPV Vaccine

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women vaccinated with earlier versions of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine may only need cervical cancer screening every five years starting at age 25 or 30, and women who've received the updated vaccine need screening even less often, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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AHA Urges Awareness of Statin Interaction With Other CV Meds

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Statins can interact with other drugs prescribed for cardiovascular disease, but there are ways to navigate the issue, according to new recommendations from the American Heart Association published online Oct. 17 in Circulation.

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Regulatory T Cells Decreased With Farm Exposure at Age 6

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- At age 6 years, regulatory T cells (Tregs) are decreased with farm exposure and increased among those with asthma, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Allergy.

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Herbal, Dietary Supplements Cause One-Fifth of Hepatotoxicity

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Herbal and dietary supplement (HDS)-induced liver injury accounts for 20 percent of cases of hepatotoxicity in the United States, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Hepatology.

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Considerable Economic Burden for Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For U.S. adults, the economic burden associated with vaccine-preventable diseases was estimated at about $9 billion in 2015, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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SHBG, Total Estradiol Linked to Type 2 Diabetes in Women

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and total estradiol (TE) are associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to research published online Oct. 10 in Diabetes.

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Income Predicts Receipt of Weight-Loss Advice

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For overweight or obese individuals, income predicts receipt of weight-loss advice from health care providers, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Arrhythmias Not Induced by Caffeine in Heart Failure Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Caffeine doesn't appear to increase the risk of arrhythmias in patients with heart failure, according to research published online Oct. 17 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Quality of Outpatient Care Has Not Consistently Improved in U.S.

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts to improve the quality of clinical care in the United States have had little impact on many aspects of outpatient care, according to an analysis published online Oct. 17 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Adolescent BMI Predicts Diabetes Mellitus Mortality

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent body mass index (BMI) predicts diabetes mellitus (DM) mortality in midlife, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Diabetes Care.

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CDC: Complementary Health Use Up With Musculoskeletal Pain

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of complementary health approaches is significantly higher for U.S. adults with musculoskeletal pain disorders, according to a report published online Oct. 12 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health Statistics Reports.

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New Recs for RBC Transfusion, Optimal RBC Storage Length

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a clinical practice guideline published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, recommendations are presented for the target hemoglobin level for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and optimal duration of RBC storage.

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Lower Monthly Premiums for Narrow-Network Plans

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Narrow-network health insurance plans have lower monthly premiums than larger-network plans, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Early Births Down With 17α-Hydroxyprogesterone Caproate

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women with a prior preterm birth, cerclage plus 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate is associated with a significant reduction in delivery at less than 24 weeks of gestation compared with cerclage alone, according to a study published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Data Mining, Experiments ID QT Prolonging Drug Interactions

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Data mining coupled with laboratory experiments can identify QT interval-prolonging drug-drug interactions (QT-DDIs), according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Home-Based CBT Program for Sleep Feasible in Pregnancy

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A home-based cognitive-behavioral training program for sleep during late pregnancy is feasible and effective, according to a study published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Snus Use Tied to Higher Risk of Prostate Cancer Mortality

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A type of smokeless tobacco called snus may increase a prostate cancer patient's mortality risk, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the International Journal of Cancer.

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New Active Zika Transmission Area in Miami-Dade County

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new active Zika transmission zone was declared Thursday by Florida health officials.

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Obesity Ups Risk for Secondary Primary Cancers in Men

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity before a cancer diagnosis is associated with an increased risk for overall and individual secondary primary cancers (SPCs) in males, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Delayed Pushing Linked to Longer Second Stage of Labor

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For nulliparous women, delayed pushing is associated with longer second stage duration and increased odds of cesarean delivery and postpartum hemorrhage, according to a study published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Migrants Screened for Active TB Pose Negligible Transmission Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Migrants from countries with a high incidence of tuberculosis who undergo screening before entry to low-incidence countries pose a negligible risk of onward transmission but are at increased risk of the infection, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in The Lancet.

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Medicaid Revenue Up in States With Medicaid Expansion

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals in states that implemented Medicaid expansion in 2014 had a significant increase in Medicaid revenue, according to a study published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Isolated From Semen

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first complete genome sequence of a sample of Zika virus derived from semen has been obtained, according to research published in the September/October issue of Genome Announcements.

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Downward Trend in U.S. Breast Cancer Mortality Continues

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The racial gap for breast cancer mortality is closing, particularly among younger women, according to research published in the Oct. 14 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Androgen Deprivation Therapy May Raise Dementia Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of dementia might be doubled for prostate cancer patients who are treated with androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), according to a study published online Oct. 13 in JAMA Oncology.

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Current Election Causing Americans Significant Stress

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. presidential election has caused stress for more than half of American adults, regardless of party affiliation, according to a survey conducted by the American Psychological Association.

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Olympic Panel Says Strenuous Exercise Safe During Pregnancy

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Strenuous exercise during pregnancy doesn't appear to increase the risk of most pregnancy complications for mother or baby, a new report from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) says. The statement was published online Oct. 12 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Half of U.S. Women Expect to Have Child in the Future

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Fifty percent of U.S. women aged 15 to 44 years expect to have a child in the future, according to an October data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Late-Pregnancy Zika Infection Can Still Affect Fetal Brain

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus may harm a infant's brain even if the mother is infected just before giving birth, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Inhaled Levodopa May Rapidly Relieve Parkinson's Symptoms

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An inhaled version of the Parkinson's drug levodopa can help when patients experience symptoms between doses of the pill form of the medication, according to a study published in the Oct. 12 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Study Finds Mammograms Lead to High Rate of Overdiagnosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mammography screening is much more likely to find insignificant breast tumors than it is to catch potentially life-threatening cancer in its early stages, according to a study published in the Oct. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Second Trimester Lipids Can ID Gestational Diabetes

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early second trimester lipids can identify maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Diabetes Care.

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Ovarian Preservation Doesn't Impact Prognosis in Cervical CA

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women with early-stage cervical adenocarcinoma, ovarian preservation does not impact survival, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Computerized Ordering Tool Cuts Imaging Cardiac Stress Tests

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A computerized order entry tool can increase the use of nonimaging cardiac stress tests among hospitalized patients, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Low Diastolic Pressure Linked to Subclinical Myocardial Damage

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low diastolic blood pressure (DBP) seems to be associated with subclinical myocardial damage, according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Acupuncture May Cut Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Half of women treated with acupuncture report a decline in the frequency of menopausal vasomotor symptoms (VMS), according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Menopause.

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Risk of Nephropathy From Radiocontrast Overestimated

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of radiocontrast-associated nephropathy may be overestimated, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Calcium Supplements May Be Detrimental to Heart Health

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary calcium in the form of supplements, but not calcium-rich foods, might have a harmful impact on the heart, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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SSRI Use During Pregnancy Tied to Speech Issues in Offspring

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose mothers used a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) during pregnancy may be more likely to develop speech and language disorders, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Heart Rate Wristbands Often Display Inaccurate Data

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Watch-like wristbands that monitor heart rate may not offer true readings during exercise, according to a research letter published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Some Antihypertensives Linked to Depression, Bipolar Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some antihypertensive medications may increase the risk that patients will be hospitalized for depression and bipolar disorder, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Hypertension.

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Orthostatic Hypotension May Increase Risk of Dementia

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is an association between orthostatic hypotension and an increased risk for dementia, according to a new study published online Oct. 11 in PLOS Medicine.

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Late Mortality Mainly Noncardiac for TAVR Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), late mortality is mainly related to noncardiac causes, according to research published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Cortisol Mediates Benefit for Early Session Psychotherapy

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia, cortisol mediates the effect of the time of day on subsequent outcome, with greater clinical improvement seen for earlier exposure sessions, according to a study published in the December issue of Psychoneuroendocrinology.

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Social Reintegration of Hodgkin's Survivors Impeded by Fatigue

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Severe fatigue (sFA) can impede social reintegration in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) survivors, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Variation in State Policies Regarding Freestanding ERs

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is considerable variation in state policies regarding freestanding emergency departments, according to a report published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Volunteering May Help Prevent Cognitive Impairment in Seniors

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who volunteer have lower risk of developing cognitive impairment, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Low HDL-C, High TG Increase Risk for Diabetic Kidney Disease

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetes, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and high triglyceride (TG) levels are associated with increased risk of diabetic kidney disease (defined as low estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], an eGFR reduction >30 percent, and/or albuminuria), according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Diabetes Care.

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Doctors Better Diagnosticians Than Symptom-Checker Programs

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are twice as likely to get the right diagnosis on the first try as 23 popular symptom-checking computer programs, according to a research letter published online Oct. 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Trends in Dietary Supplement Use Among U.S. Adults Changing

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of traditional multivitamins is decreasing among Americans, while supplements such as vitamin D, fish oil, and probiotics are becoming more popular, according to a study published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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High-Protein Diet Doesn't Improve Insulin Sensitivity

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal obese women who lose weight eating a high-protein diet may not experience any improvements in insulin sensitivity, according to a study published in the Oct. 11 issue of Cell Reports.

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Placebo Effect Seen in Chiropractic Tx of Migraine

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Real and sham chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (CSMT) are equally likely to ease patients' migraine pain, according to a study published online Oct. 2 in the European Journal of Neurology.

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DEET to Protect Against Zika Appears Safe During Pregnancy

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) insect repellents won't harm a pregnant woman or her fetus when used as instructed to prevent Zika infection, according to research published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Exertion, Emotional Upset Can Trigger Myocardial Infarction

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intense anger or heavy physical exertion may be triggers for an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in some people, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Circulation.

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Midlife Hypertension Appears Detrimental to Cognitive Function

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Midlife hypertension may increase risk for dementia later in life, according to a new scientific statement published online Oct. 10 in Hypertension.

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CDI Risk Up When Prior Occupant of Hospital Bed Got Antibiotics

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When a hospital patient is taking antibiotics, the next patient to use the same bed may face an elevated risk of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), according to a study published online Oct. 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Copay Assist Programs Creating Problems in Health Care Markets

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Despite offering assistance to individuals who cannot afford expensive medications, copay assistance programs create broader problems in health care markets, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Oct. 11 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Genetic Increase in SBP Linked to Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) due to genetic variants is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, according to research published online Oct. 4 in Diabetes.

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Geriatric Scholars Program Benefits Most Participants

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Veterans Affairs Geriatric Scholars Program (GSP), which utilizes a blended program educational format, improves clinical practices, and most participants report improved job satisfaction, according to research published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Gene Associated With Risk of Acute Otitis Media

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A potential genetic link to a child's higher risk of acute otitis media has been identified, according to research published online Sept. 28 in Nature Communications.

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Not Enough Men Who Have Sex With Men Aware of PrEP

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many men who have sex with men (MSM) are not aware that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) medication can protect them from HIV, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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U.S. Health Care System Is One of the Least Efficient Worldwide

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is one of the least efficient worldwide based on a Bloomberg index that assesses life expectancy, health care spending per capita, and relative spending as a share of gross domestic product, according to a report published by Bloomberg.

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Hospitalizations in Pregnancy, Delivery Stable for HIV-Infected

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 2004 to 2011 there was no increase in the number of hospitalizations during pregnancy and delivery for HIV-infected women, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Most Women Feel PCPs Are Involved in Breast Cancer Care

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Most women newly diagnosed with breast cancer perceive high primary care provider (PCP) quality, and report that their PCPs have high engagement and communication, according to research published online Oct. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Daily Intranasal Steroid Tx Not Better for Allergy Relief

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Daily intranasal corticosteroids (INCS) are not superior to on-demand INCS or to antihistamine on demand for the treatment of pollen-related allergies in children, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Allergy.

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Compulsive Exercise Test Valid for Adults With Anorexia

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Compulsive Exercise Test (CET) is a valid and reliable self-report measure of compulsive exercise for adults with anorexia nervosa (AN), according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Unique Skin Phenotype for Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have a different skin phenotype from that of adult patients, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Video-Only CPR Education Noninferior to Manikin Training

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For high-risk cardiac patients, video-only (VO; no manikin) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training is noninferior to training with a video self-instruction kit (VSI; with manikin), according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Communication Facilitator Beneficial in Intensive Care Unit

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adding a full-time trained communication facilitator in the intensive care unit (ICU) may improve quality of care while also reducing costs, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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New Drug for Alcohol Use Disorder Appears Promising

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug -- a vasopressin antagonist called ABT-436 -- shows some promise in treating alcohol use disorder and smoking, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Neuropsychopharmacology.

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Strategies Presented for Managing Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Effective strategies for managing physician burnout include mindfulness and stress-management training, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet.

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Global Burden of Disease Report Evaluates the World's Health

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The United States lags behind other advanced nations when it comes to infant mortality and the life expectancy of its citizens, according to a comprehensive review of global health statistics published in the Oct. 8 issue of The Lancet.

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Range of Perinatal Factors May Raise Risk for OCD in Offspring

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy behaviors and certain childbirth complications may influence a child's risk of developing obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), according to a study published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Long-Term Tamoxifen Does Lower Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors does cut breast cancer patients' risk of developing cancer in their other breast, according to findings published online Oct. 6 in JAMA Oncology.

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Hospital Choice Key in Post-Myocardial Infarction Survival

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients with myocardial infarction (MI) who receive immediate high-quality care from their hospital often receive a long-term survival advantage, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Frailty Under-Recognized in Older Thoracic Surgery Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Frailty often goes unrecognized in older thoracic surgery patients, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Women's Better Memory Skills May Delay Alzheimer's Diagnosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in women may be more difficult than in men because older women tend to retain better verbal memory, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Neurology.

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Burns, Blast Injuries on the Rise From Exploding E-Cigarettes

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic-cigarette devices are randomly and unexpectedly exploding, burning and injuring people near them when they detonate, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CDC Reviews Measles Outbreak in Amish Community

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The measles outbreak that occurred in an Amish community in 2014 illustrates the ongoing threat the infection presents -- and the importance of routine vaccination, U.S. government researchers report in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Industry-Funded Team Says Algorithm Improves HbA1c Value

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Industry-funded researchers say they've developed a way to improve the accuracy of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) testing, according to a report published in the Oct. 5 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Scientists Claim Limit to Human Life Span Has Been Reached

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The average maximum human life span is 115 years, and the absolute limit of human life span will be 125 years, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Nature.

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Burden of Cirrhosis, Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure Increasing

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 2001 to 2011 there was a considerable increase in the burden of cirrhosis and acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), according to research published online Oct. 3 in Hepatology.

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DEA Planning to Cut Production of Opioid Medication

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) says it has mandated significant cuts in the production of Schedule II opiate and opioid medication.

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More Evidence of Zika Connection to Guillain-Barré Syndrome

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a new report, published online Oct. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine, an international team of researchers says it has developed the strongest evidence to date that Zika virus can cause Guillain-Barré syndrome.

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Changes in Emotional Processing With Mindfulness Meditation

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mindfulness meditation produces demonstrable changes in emotional processing, according to a study published online Sept. 7 in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.

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Low Incidence of Cervical Cancer, CIN3+ for HPV-Negative Women

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV)-negative women have low long-term incidence of cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 or worse (CIN3+), which supports an extension of the cervical screening interval beyond five years for certain women, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in The BMJ.

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U.S. Smoking Rates Vary Across Counties Within States

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Parts of the Midwest and South have the highest smoking rates in the United States, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Denver Clinic Boosts HPV Vaccination Rates

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The way to increase the number of girls and boys who get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine may be as simple as giving it as part of a routine bundle of vaccines, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Opioid Use Disorder, Heroin Use Up Among Young Adults

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults in the United States are more likely to become addicted to prescription opioids than they were in years past, and they're also more likely to use heroin, according to a study recently published online in Addictive Behaviors.

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No Evidence Activity Tracker Devices Raise Fitness Levels

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There's no evidence that fitness tracking devices raise activity levels enough to improve health, even with financial rewards, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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Childhood Trauma Tied to Higher Odds of Shorter Telomeres

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who have experienced stress as children appear to have an increased risk of shorter telomeres, according to research published online Oct. 3 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Interruptions in Inpatient Stroke Rehab Often Avoidable

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many interruptions in inpatient rehabilitation for stroke survivors and patients with brain and spinal cord injuries are avoidable, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.

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Exenatide Does Not Promote Weight Loss in Schizophrenia

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For antipsychotic-treated obese patients with schizophrenia, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) do not appear to promote weight loss, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Vitamin D Doesn't Improve Glucose Measures

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Weekly doses of vitamin D do not improve oral glucose tolerance or markers of glycemic status among those at risk for diabetes, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Depression Common in Patients With Chronic Angina

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Development of depression is common in patients with newly diagnosed chronic stable angina, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Zika Virus Found in Sperm, Not Just Semen

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In correspondence published in the October issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases, researchers report that the Zika virus has been found inside the sperm of a man who had just returned from French Guyana.

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Political Views May Influence Doctors' Advice, Decisions

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A doctor's political beliefs can sway their treatment decisions, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Men With Zika Exposure to Abstain From Conceiving Longer

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released new recommendations on how long men with either Zika infection or exposure should abstain from trying to conceive. The recommendations have been published in the Sept. 30 early-release issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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CDC Updates Zika Travel Advisory for Southeast Asia

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has posted Zika virus-related special travel considerations for 11 Southeastern Asian countries.

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More Evidence for Benefit of Reduced Salt Intake on Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sodium intake has a direct relationship with total mortality, according to a report published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Patient Satisfaction Up With Pharmacist-Managed Warfarin Tx

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pharmacist-managed warfarin anticoagulation therapy is associated with improved patient satisfaction, although the benefits in terms of control, safety, and mortality are unclear, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Doctors Spending in Excess of $32,000 on Health IT

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are spending more than $32,000 per year on health information technology (IT), according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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High Incidence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults have high incidence of cardiovascular risk factors, with increased incidence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia for blacks, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Absent Pulses Up Risk of Major Vascular Outcomes in T2DM

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, absent dorsalis pedis and/or posterior tibial pulses are associated with increased risk of major vascular outcomes, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in Diabetes Care.

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Summer Concentrations of 25OHD Predict Bone Mineral Density

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Summer levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25OHD) are associated with bone mineral density of the total hip, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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New AMA Module Helps Identify Physician Distress

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new resource has been developed to help physicians identify distressed colleagues and help them to access care, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Researchers Question Value of Web-Based Test for Prediabetes

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A simple, seven-question test for prediabetes may be needlessly sending millions of healthy Americans to their physicians for follow-up testing, according to a research letter published online Oct. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Higher Bleeding Risk Seen With Rivaroxaban Versus Dabigatran

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Rivaroxaban may pose a slightly greater risk of serious bleeding than dabigatran in patients with atrial fibrillation, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Prevalence of Allergic Sensitization Increases With Age

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of allergic sensitization increases with age, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Allergy.

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Novel Proactive Model Identifies Falls, Syncope, Dizziness

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A novel proactive multidisciplinary service model can identify falls, syncope, and dizziness symptoms, and reveal new diagnoses, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Physical Activity Reduces Intrahepatic Lipid Content

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and underlying metabolic disorders, physical activity is associated with a reduction in intrahepatic lipid content and markers of hepatocellular injury, according to a meta-analysis published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Increased Total, CVD Mortality in Young Adults With T1DM

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults with long-standing, childhood-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have increased total and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in Diabetes Care.

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Medication Adherence Stressful for Psoriasis Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adhering to medication regimens for the treatment of psoriasis can be an additional source of considerable emotional distress for patients, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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