October 2016 Briefing - Emergency Medicine

Share this content:

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Emergency Medicine for October 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Opioid Poisonings in Children, Teens Rising Dramatically

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The number of young children and teens hospitalized for overdosing on opioids has increased nearly two-fold in recent years, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Full Text

Guidelines Presented for Fluoroquinolone Use in Children

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a clinical report published online Oct. 31 in Pediatrics, guidelines are presented for the use of systemic and topical fluoroquinolones in children.

Full Text

Few Changes in Employer-Sponsored Insurance 2013-2014

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Private sector employer-sponsored health insurance offerings were similar in 2013 and 2014, with <3.5 percent of employers dropping coverage and 1.1 percent adding coverage, according to a report published online Oct. 26 in Health Affairs.

Abstract
Full Text

Skin Patch to Treat Peanut Allergy Appears Promising

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A skin patch that delivers small amounts of peanut protein may help treat children and young adults with peanut allergy, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Quality Improvement Methods Improve Asthma Care

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of quality improvement (QI) methods can improve timely administration of short-acting β-agonists (SABAs) for acute asthma in a pediatric emergency department, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Heart Failure Care Up, Regardless of Hospital Teaching Status

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to performance measures is similar at teaching hospitals (TH) and nonteaching hospitals (NTH), according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Survival Outcomes Similar for Short-, Long-Term Blood Storage

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Using the freshest blood for transfusions does not appear to significantly improve patient survival, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Deaths Down 1999 to 2014

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 1999 to 2014 the numbers of deaths, both accidental and intentional, due to carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning significantly declined in the United States, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lead Poisoning Possible From Glazed Mexican Ceramics

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to high concentrations of lead -- often found in glazes that line traditional Mexican ceramics, cookware, and dishware -- can be toxic after extended periods of handling, according to a case report published online Oct. 17 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pulmonary Embolism May Be Cause of Syncope in Some Elderly

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- About one of every six patients hospitalized for a first episode of syncope has a pulmonary embolism, according to a study published in the Oct. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

New Method May Provide Better Rx for Seniors' Ankle Fractures

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of plaster cast might help older adults avoid surgery for unstable ankle fractures, according to research published in the Oct. 11 issue the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Certain Factors Predict Repeat ER Visits for Ureteral Stones

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with ureteral stones, those who are younger, have proximal stones, and require intravenous narcotics for pain control are more likely to return to the emergency department within 30 days, according to a study published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Herbal, Dietary Supplements Cause One-Fifth of Hepatotoxicity

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Herbal and dietary supplement (HDS)-induced liver injury accounts for 20 percent of cases of hepatotoxicity in the United States, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Hepatology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New Recs for RBC Transfusion, Optimal RBC Storage Length

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a clinical practice guideline published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, recommendations are presented for the target hemoglobin level for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and optimal duration of RBC storage.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: Possible Contamination of Open-Heart Surgery Devices

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some LivaNova PLC (formerly Sorin Group Deutschland GmbH) Stockert 3T heater-cooler devices might have been contaminated with Mycobacterium chimaera during manufacturing, according to a press release from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

Computerized Ordering Tool Cuts Imaging Cardiac Stress Tests

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A computerized order entry tool can increase the use of nonimaging cardiac stress tests among hospitalized patients, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Risk of Nephropathy From Radiocontrast Overestimated

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of radiocontrast-associated nephropathy may be overestimated, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Doctors Better Diagnosticians Than Symptom-Checker Programs

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are twice as likely to get the right diagnosis on the first try as 23 popular symptom-checking computer programs, according to a research letter published online Oct. 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Variation in State Policies Regarding Freestanding ERs

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is considerable variation in state policies regarding freestanding emergency departments, according to a report published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Most Anaphylaxis Patients in ER Treated Appropriately

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of anaphylaxis patients seeking treatment in Belgian emergency departments are treated in accordance with the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) guidelines, according to a study published Oct. 6 in Allergy.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copay Assist Programs Creating Problems in Health Care Markets

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Despite offering assistance to individuals who cannot afford expensive medications, copay assistance programs create broader problems in health care markets, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Oct. 11 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Exertion, Emotional Upset Can Trigger Myocardial Infarction

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intense anger or heavy physical exertion may be triggers for an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in some people, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Circulation.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

U.S. Health Care System Is One of the Least Efficient Worldwide

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is one of the least efficient worldwide based on a Bloomberg index that assesses life expectancy, health care spending per capita, and relative spending as a share of gross domestic product, according to a report published by Bloomberg.

More Information

Video-Only CPR Education Noninferior to Manikin Training

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For high-risk cardiac patients, video-only (VO; no manikin) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training is noninferior to training with a video self-instruction kit (VSI; with manikin), according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Strategies Presented for Managing Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Effective strategies for managing physician burnout include mindfulness and stress-management training, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospital Choice Key in Post-Myocardial Infarction Survival

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients with myocardial infarction (MI) who receive immediate high-quality care from their hospital often receive a long-term survival advantage, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Burns, Blast Injuries on the Rise From Exploding E-Cigarettes

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic-cigarette devices are randomly and unexpectedly exploding, burning and injuring people near them when they detonate, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text

CDC Reviews Measles Outbreak in Amish Community

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The measles outbreak that occurred in an Amish community in 2014 illustrates the ongoing threat the infection presents -- and the importance of routine vaccination, U.S. government researchers report in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

More Evidence of Zika Connection to Guillain-Barré Syndrome

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a new report, published online Oct. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine, an international team of researchers says it has developed the strongest evidence to date that Zika virus can cause Guillain-Barré syndrome.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

DEA Planning to Cut Production of Opioid Medication

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) says it has mandated significant cuts in the production of Schedule II opiate and opioid medication.

More Information

Hypothermia No Help When Cardiac Arrest Occurs in Hospital

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While therapeutic hypothermia may help improve some outcomes, it doesn't appear to provide benefit when cardiac arrest happens in a hospital setting, according to a study published in the Oct. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Opioid Use Disorder, Heroin Use Up Among Young Adults

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults in the United States are more likely to become addicted to prescription opioids than they were in years past, and they're also more likely to use heroin, according to a study recently published online in Addictive Behaviors.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Doctors Spending in Excess of $32,000 on Health IT

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are spending more than $32,000 per year on health information technology (IT), according to an article published in Medical Economics.

More Information

New AMA Module Helps Identify Physician Distress

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new resource has been developed to help physicians identify distressed colleagues and help them to access care, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Novel Proactive Model Identifies Falls, Syncope, Dizziness

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A novel proactive multidisciplinary service model can identify falls, syncope, and dizziness symptoms, and reveal new diagnoses, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

SABCS: Artificial Intelligence May Aid Doctors in Breast Cancer Care

SABCS: Artificial Intelligence May Aid Doctors in Breast ...

'Watson Oncology' agreed with doctors 90 percent of the time in many cases, researchers find

SABCS: Scalp-Cooling System Can Reduce Chemo-Related Hair Loss

SABCS: Scalp-Cooling System Can Reduce Chemo-Related Hair Loss

Devices reduce blood flow to hair follicles during chemotherapy treatments

SABCS: Aromatase Inhibitors Tied to Reduced Endothelial Function

SABCS: Aromatase Inhibitors Tied to Reduced Endothelial Function

Women on aromatase inhibitors exhibit less elasticity in their blood vessels

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »