October 2016 Briefing - Cardiology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for October 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Low and High HDL Tied to Increased Risk of Mortality

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low and high levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are linked to increased mortality risk, according to a study published in the Nov. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Few Changes in Employer-Sponsored Insurance 2013-2014

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Private sector employer-sponsored health insurance offerings were similar in 2013 and 2014, with <3.5 percent of employers dropping coverage and 1.1 percent adding coverage, according to a report published online Oct. 26 in Health Affairs.

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Depressive Symptoms Linked to Functional Status in CAD

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with stable coronary artery disease, depressive symptoms and cardiac disease severity independently affect patient-reported functional status, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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FDA Approves Device to Prevent Recurrent Strokes in PFO Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Amplatzer PFO Occluder device has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to prevent another stroke among patients who have had at least one prior stroke involving a patent foramen ovale (PFO).

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Cardiometabolic Syndrome Ups Subclinical Atherosclerosis Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS) is associated with increased risk of subclinical atherosclerosis, but the risk is attenuated by high fitness, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Useful Tips Offered for Addressing Negative Patient Reviews

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an article published in Medical Economics, five tips are presented to address negative patient reviews.

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Child-Parent Screening for Hypercholesterolemia Feasible

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for hypercholesterolemia is feasible at routine child immunization visits in primary care practices, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Rehospitalization After AMI Linked to Worse Health Status

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients after acute myocardial infarction, rehospitalization for unstable angina (UA) and unplanned revascularization during the first year are associated with worse health status, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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FDA Warns of Testosterone, AAS Abuse and Dependence

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Supplemental testosterone and related anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) can cause heart attacks, personality changes, and infertility, and are easily abused, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns, adding that labeling on all prescription testosterone products will be revised.

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Heart Rate, BP in Male Teens Tied to Later Risk for Psych Disorders

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young men with a resting heart rate and blood pressure that are elevated -- but still within normal range -- appear more likely to develop a wide range of mental illnesses later in their lives, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Ratio of ω-6:ω-3 Fatty Acids Implicated in Obesity

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Governments and international organizations should focus on redressing the balance of ω-6 and ω-3 fatty acids in order to address obesity, according to an editorial published in the September issue of Open Heart.

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Heart Failure Care Up, Regardless of Hospital Teaching Status

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to performance measures is similar at teaching hospitals (TH) and nonteaching hospitals (NTH), according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Even Young Blood Vessels Can Be Damaged by Air Pollution

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Even young, healthy adults can suffer endothelial injury from air pollution, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Circulation Research.

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Review: No Clear Link for Calcium Supplements, CVD

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Calcium supplements, taken within recommended levels, can be considered safe for the heart, according to new guidelines and an evidence review published online Oct. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Liraglutide Increases Heart Rate in T2DM With Stable CAD

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Liraglutide increases heart rate (HR) and reduces heart rate variability (HRV) in overweight patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D) and stable coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Diabetes Care.

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Improved Leg Ulcer Healing With Hair Follicle Punch Graft

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with venous leg ulcers, ulcer healing is significantly increased using hair follicle punch scalp grafts, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Guidance for Coronary Patients With ASA/NSAID Sensitivity

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable chronic ischemic heart disease (CIHD) and histories of nonsevere hypersensitivity reactions to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), an ASA challenge is recommended, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Allergy.

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Five-Year Outcomes Similar for Off-, On-Pump CABG in CAD

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Five-year outcomes are similar for patients with coronary artery disease who undergo off-pump or on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), according to a study published online Oct. 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual Canadian Cardiovascular Congress, held from Oct. 22 to 25 in Montreal.

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More Support for Health Benefits of Chocolate

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new analysis of existing studies, published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Nutrition, provides more support for the idea that cocoa in chocolate may provide some health benefits.

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Cardiac Rehabilitation Does Not Up Health Status After AMI

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Participation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) does not improve reported health status during the year following acute myocardial infarction (AMI); however, participation in CR does confer a significant survival benefit, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Digestive Byproduct of Meat Linked to Mortality Risk in PAD

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) who also have high levels of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a by-product of meat consumption, may have a higher risk of dying within five years, compared with those with the lowest levels, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Angina Pectoris Linked to Worse HRQoL in Heart Failure

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, angina pectoris (AP) is associated with worse health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and depressive symptoms, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Considerable Absenteeism Costs for Chronic Disease, Risk Factors

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Considerable costs are associated with absenteeism related to chronic diseases and health risk factors, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Operator Experience Impacts Prognosis for Left Main PCI

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing left main coronary artery (LM) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), operator experience is associated with prognosis, according to a study published in the Oct. 24 issue of the JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Researchers Say Not All A-Fib Patients Need Anticoagulation

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients with atrial fibrillation who have implanted pacemakers or defibrillators may not always need anticoagulation, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Circulation.

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AHA Urges Awareness of Statin Interaction With Other CV Meds

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Statins can interact with other drugs prescribed for cardiovascular disease, but there are ways to navigate the issue, according to new recommendations from the American Heart Association published online Oct. 17 in Circulation.

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Spironolactone Benefits Exercise Tolerance in HFpEF

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) with an exercise-induced increase in the ratio between early mitral inflow velocity and mitral annular early diastolic velocity (E/e'), spironolactone is associated with improved exercise capacity, according to a study published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Arrhythmias Not Induced by Caffeine in Heart Failure Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Caffeine doesn't appear to increase the risk of arrhythmias in patients with heart failure, according to research published online Oct. 17 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Quality of Outpatient Care Has Not Consistently Improved in U.S.

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts to improve the quality of clinical care in the United States have had little impact on many aspects of outpatient care, according to an analysis published online Oct. 17 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Income Predicts Receipt of Weight-Loss Advice

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For overweight or obese individuals, income predicts receipt of weight-loss advice from health care providers, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Lower Monthly Premiums for Narrow-Network Plans

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Narrow-network health insurance plans have lower monthly premiums than larger-network plans, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Data Mining, Experiments ID QT Prolonging Drug Interactions

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Data mining coupled with laboratory experiments can identify QT interval-prolonging drug-drug interactions (QT-DDIs), according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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CDC: Possible Contamination of Open-Heart Surgery Devices

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some LivaNova PLC (formerly Sorin Group Deutschland GmbH) Stockert 3T heater-cooler devices might have been contaminated with Mycobacterium chimaera during manufacturing, according to a press release from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Smartphone Device Can Detect Undiagnosed A-Fib

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A small device synced to a smartphone may help identify new cases of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a preliminary study published online Oct. 12 in Heart.

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Low Diastolic Pressure Linked to Subclinical Myocardial Damage

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low diastolic blood pressure (DBP) seems to be associated with subclinical myocardial damage, according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Computerized Ordering Tool Cuts Imaging Cardiac Stress Tests

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A computerized order entry tool can increase the use of nonimaging cardiac stress tests among hospitalized patients, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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PCI for Concurrent Chronic Total Occlusions Safe in STEMI

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), additional percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for concurrent coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) in a non-infarct-related artery is safe, according to a study published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Calcium Supplements May Be Detrimental to Heart Health

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary calcium in the form of supplements, but not calcium-rich foods, might have a harmful impact on the heart, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Heart Rate Wristbands Often Display Inaccurate Data

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Watch-like wristbands that monitor heart rate may not offer true readings during exercise, according to a research letter published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Some Antihypertensives Linked to Depression, Bipolar Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some antihypertensive medications may increase the risk that patients will be hospitalized for depression and bipolar disorder, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Hypertension.

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Orthostatic Hypotension May Increase Risk of Dementia

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is an association between orthostatic hypotension and an increased risk for dementia, according to a new study published online Oct. 11 in PLOS Medicine.

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Late Mortality Mainly Noncardiac for TAVR Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), late mortality is mainly related to noncardiac causes, according to research published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Doctors Better Diagnosticians Than Symptom-Checker Programs

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are twice as likely to get the right diagnosis on the first try as 23 popular symptom-checking computer programs, according to a research letter published online Oct. 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Trends in Dietary Supplement Use Among U.S. Adults Changing

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of traditional multivitamins is decreasing among Americans, while supplements such as vitamin D, fish oil, and probiotics are becoming more popular, according to a study published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Midlife Hypertension Appears Detrimental to Cognitive Function

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Midlife hypertension may increase risk for dementia later in life, according to a new scientific statement published online Oct. 10 in Hypertension.

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Exertion, Emotional Upset Can Trigger Myocardial Infarction

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intense anger or heavy physical exertion may be triggers for an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in some people, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Circulation.

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Copay Assist Programs Creating Problems in Health Care Markets

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Despite offering assistance to individuals who cannot afford expensive medications, copay assistance programs create broader problems in health care markets, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Oct. 11 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Genetic Increase in SBP Linked to Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) due to genetic variants is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, according to research published online Oct. 4 in Diabetes.

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U.S. Health Care System Is One of the Least Efficient Worldwide

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is one of the least efficient worldwide based on a Bloomberg index that assesses life expectancy, health care spending per capita, and relative spending as a share of gross domestic product, according to a report published by Bloomberg.

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Video-Only CPR Education Noninferior to Manikin Training

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For high-risk cardiac patients, video-only (VO; no manikin) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training is noninferior to training with a video self-instruction kit (VSI; with manikin), according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Strategies Presented for Managing Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Effective strategies for managing physician burnout include mindfulness and stress-management training, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet.

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Global Burden of Disease Report Evaluates the World's Health

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The United States lags behind other advanced nations when it comes to infant mortality and the life expectancy of its citizens, according to a comprehensive review of global health statistics published in the Oct. 8 issue of The Lancet.

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Hospital Choice Key in Post-Myocardial Infarction Survival

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients with myocardial infarction (MI) who receive immediate high-quality care from their hospital often receive a long-term survival advantage, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Variation in Medicare Payments for Peri-Op Complications

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing four selected inpatient operations, there is considerable variation across hospitals in Medicare payments for those rescued from perioperative complications, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Surgery.

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Exposure to LDL-C-Lowering Genetic Variants Ups T2DM Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering genetic variants are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a meta-analysis published in the Oct. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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U.S. Smoking Rates Vary Across Counties Within States

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Parts of the Midwest and South have the highest smoking rates in the United States, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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No Evidence Activity Tracker Devices Raise Fitness Levels

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There's no evidence that fitness tracking devices raise activity levels enough to improve health, even with financial rewards, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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Hypothermia No Help When Cardiac Arrest Occurs in Hospital

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While therapeutic hypothermia may help improve some outcomes, it doesn't appear to provide benefit when cardiac arrest happens in a hospital setting, according to a study published in the Oct. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Ipsilateral Ulnar Compression Cuts Radial Artery Occlusion

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Radial artery occlusion (RAO) after transradial access (TRA) can be cut significantly with prophylactic ipsilateral ulnar compression, according to a study published in the Oct. 10 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Vitamin D Doesn't Improve Glucose Measures

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Weekly doses of vitamin D do not improve oral glucose tolerance or markers of glycemic status among those at risk for diabetes, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Depression Common in Patients With Chronic Angina

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Development of depression is common in patients with newly diagnosed chronic stable angina, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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More Evidence for Benefit of Reduced Salt Intake on Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sodium intake has a direct relationship with total mortality, according to a report published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Patient Satisfaction Up With Pharmacist-Managed Warfarin Tx

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pharmacist-managed warfarin anticoagulation therapy is associated with improved patient satisfaction, although the benefits in terms of control, safety, and mortality are unclear, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Doctors Spending in Excess of $32,000 on Health IT

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are spending more than $32,000 per year on health information technology (IT), according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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High Incidence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults have high incidence of cardiovascular risk factors, with increased incidence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia for blacks, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Risks, Benefits of Cangrelor Consistent in Angina, ACS

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with stable angina (SA) or acute coronary syndrome (ACS), the benefits and risks of cangrelor are consistent, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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New AMA Module Helps Identify Physician Distress

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new resource has been developed to help physicians identify distressed colleagues and help them to access care, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Higher Bleeding Risk Seen With Rivaroxaban Versus Dabigatran

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Rivaroxaban may pose a slightly greater risk of serious bleeding than dabigatran in patients with atrial fibrillation, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Increased Total, CVD Mortality in Young Adults With T1DM

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults with long-standing, childhood-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have increased total and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in Diabetes Care.

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Statins Reduce Risk of Mortality in Multiple Myeloma

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Statin therapy is associated with reduced risk of all-cause and multiple myeloma (MM)-specific mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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CT Colonography May Be Useful for Aneurysm Detection

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Routine assessment of the aorta during a computed tomography colonography (CTC) may aid in aneurysm detection, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology.

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