October 2015 Briefing - Pediatrics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for October 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Middle Finger Length Good Guide for Intubation Depth in Children

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Using middle finger length to guide tracheal intubation depth improves the rate of appropriate tube placement in children, according to a study published in the November issue of Pediatric Anesthesia.

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Synchronized Prescription Renewal Process Saves Time

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A synchronized prescription renewal process can save physicians time and money, which can be dedicated to patient care, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Doctors May Wait Too Long to Up Rx for Severe Acne

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients with severe acne remain on antibiotics too long before they are prescribed more effective medication, according to research published online Oct. 30 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Increasing Numbers of Med School Applicants, Enrollees

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a 25 percent increase in the number of medical school enrollees since 2002, with the number reaching an all-time high of 20,630 this year, according to a report published online Oct. 22 by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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CDC: Not Enough Young Girls Getting HPV Vaccination

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates among American girls remain too low, according to research published in the Oct. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Sanofi Recalls Auvi-Q Injectors Used to Treat Anaphylaxis

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- All packs of Auvi-Q injectors are being recalled in the United States as some may not deliver the correct dose of epinephrine, according to a news release issued by Sanofi on Wednesday.

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State Abusive Head Trauma Program Didn't Reduce Injuries

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A program designed to prevent abusive head trauma in North Carolina didn't reduce rates of infant head injuries related to the abuse, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Nearly 15 Percent of Plans Lack In-Network Specialists

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of federal marketplace plans lack at least one in-network specialist, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Physician Emphasizes Importance of Saying Thank You

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The importance of thanking patients for coming to see you, the physician, is described in an essay published online in Medical Economics.

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Rapid Health Benefits Seen With Sugar Reduction in Children

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cutting most of the sugar from a child's diet can rapidly improve metabolic health, even if the diet still contains the same amount of calories and carbohydrates as before, a new study suggests. The study was published online Oct. 26 in Obesity.

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ADHD Meds Up Cardiac Event Risk in Long-QT Syndrome

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with long-QT syndrome (LQTS) treated with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications have an increased risk for cardiac events, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

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CDC: Too Few Male Adolescents Receiving HPV Vaccine

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most male adolescents in the United States aren't receiving the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine alongside their other scheduled inoculations, largely because doctors fail to recommend it or adequately explain its benefits to parents, according to a report published online Oct. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Autism May Be Overdiagnosed in the United States

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As many as 9 percent of American children diagnosed with autism may not have the disorder, according to a federal government study published online Oct. 20 in Autism.

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MenB Vaccine Recommended for 16- to 23-Year-Olds

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccination is recommended for adolescents and young adults aged 16 to 23 years to provide short-term protection from most strains of serogroup B meningococcal disease, according to a report published in the Oct. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Oral Immunotherapy Seems Beneficial for Cow's Milk Allergy

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most cow's milk allergic patients undergoing oral immunotherapy are able to consume cow's milk protein regularly without significant adverse reactions, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in Allergy.

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AMA: Eight Reasons for Nonadherence to Medications

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eight reasons associated with patient's intentional nonadherence to medications have been identified in a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Childhood Antibiotics Rx Tied to Weight Gain Through Adolescence

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Repeated antibiotic use is linked to greater weight gains in children, and it could affect their weight for the rest of their lives, a new study suggests. The findings were published online Oct. 21 in the International Journal of Obesity.

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Secondhand Smoke in Infancy May Harm Children's Teeth

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children exposed to secondhand smoke at 4 months of age may be at risk for tooth decay by age 3, according to research published online Oct. 21 in The BMJ.

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Blanket + Warmed IV Best for Hypothermic Infants

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The combination of conventional blanket rewarming and pre-warmed intravenous (IV) infusion is most effective for rewarming postoperative hypothermic infants, according to a study published in the November issue of Pediatric Anesthesia.

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High-Dose Metformin Linked to Increases in Child Height

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Metformin use at high doses seems to be associated with increases in height among children, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Many Doctors Inconsistent With HPV Vaccine Recommendations

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians are inconsistent or behind schedule in their recommendations for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Smoke Exposure in Infancy Ups Sensitization to Food Allergens

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) in infancy is associated with increased risk of sensitization to food allergens up to age 16 years, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in Allergy.

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Preeclampsia Tied to Congenital Heart Defects

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Preeclampsia may increase risk of congenital heart defects, according to research published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Gestational, Post-Delivery Weight Gain Linked to Child's Weight

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal gestational weight gain (GWG) and post-delivery weight gain are independently associated with a child's weight development, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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AAP: Alcohol Leading Preventable Cause of Birth Defects, Disability

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- No amount of alcohol should be considered safe to drink during any trimester of pregnancy, according to a clinical report published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Dichoptic Movies Aid Childhood Amblyopia

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Passive viewing of dichoptic feature films is feasible and could treat childhood amblyopia, according to a small study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus.

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Caudal Regional Anesthesia Not Linked to Fistula Formation

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Caudal regional anesthesia seems not to be associated with urethrocutaneous fistula formation in pediatric patients undergoing primary hypospadias repair, according to a study published in the November issue of Pediatric Anesthesia.

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'Failure Mode and Effective Analysis' Ups Error Awareness

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The application of failure mode and effective analysis (FMEA) correlates with increased awareness of medical errors in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Pediatric Anesthesia.

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Methicillin-Susceptible Staph Strain Causes More Infections

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Invasive methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infections are more common than invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Depressive Symptoms Common Among Youths With Diabetes

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There are more youths with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) reporting depressive symptoms than there are depression diagnoses in this population, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Greater Breast CA-Specific Distress for Girls With Family Hx

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Girls from families with a history of breast cancer experience greater breast cancer-specific distress, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Only Some Energy Drinks Change Endothelial Function

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some energy drinks appear to significantly improve endothelial function, while other energy drinks and coffee do not, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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CDC: Teen Smoking Down, Marijuana Use Up

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although new statistics show that smoking among American teenagers has dropped 64 percent in recent years, the same report also shows that marijuana use has doubled. The report was published Oct. 16 in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).

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Patterns of Pediatric Mandible Fx Vary With Age, Sex

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The patterns of pediatric mandible fracture vary with age and sex, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Peri-Op Experience Similar for Children With, Without Autism

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a significant difference in premedication type compared with children without ASD, although in other respects, their perioperative experiences are similar, according to a study published in the November issue of Pediatric Anesthesia.

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Review: Maternal Flu Shot Doesn't Up Congenital Anomalies

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal influenza vaccination is not associated with increased risk of congenital anomalies, according to a review published online Oct. 7 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Glucose Threshold Suggested for Neonatal Hypoglycemia

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal hypoglycemia seems not to be associated with adverse neurologic outcomes when the condition is treated to maintain a certain blood glucose concentration, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Budesonide May Be Beneficial in Extremely Preterm Infants

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For extremely premature infants, early inhaled budesonide is associated with reduced incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia but may be linked to increased mortality, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Comprehensive Prevention Program Cuts Suicide Attempts

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The comprehensive Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Suicide Prevention Program (GLS program) is associated with a reduction in suicide attempts among youths, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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About 23,000 ER Visits/Year for Supplement-Linked Side Effects

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Every year about 23,000 U.S. emergency department visits involve adverse events related to dietary supplements, according to a special article published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Metronome Can Improve Rate of Compressions in Pediatric CPR

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of chest compressions during CPR can be optimized by the use of a metronome, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Computerized Tool Aids Cognitive Deficits in Cancer Survivors

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Computerized cognitive training improves cognitive deficits associated with pediatric cancer treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Enterovirus D68 Doesn't Raise Mortality Risk in Children

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) seems to be a more virulent pulmonary pathogen in children than rhinovirus or non-EV-D68 enterovirus, but it does not increase the risk of death, according to a study published Oct. 13 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Coadministering Tdap, Flu Vaccines Safe in Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Coadministering tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) and influenza vaccines appears safe in pregnancy, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Lithium Safe, Effective for Bipolar I Disorder in Children

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lithium safely and effectively reduces manic symptoms in pediatric patients treated for bipolar I disorder (BP-I), according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Maternal Glucose Levels Linked to Two CHD Phenotypes

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal midpregnancy measures of glucose and insulin are associated with two different congenital heart disease (CHD) phenotypes, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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One-Third of Children See PCPs for Mental Health Conditions

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care providers (PCPs) are the sole physician managers for more than one-third of children receiving mental health care, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Few Physical, Socio-Emotional Outcomes for C-Section

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cesarean section seems to be associated with few physical and socio-emotional outcomes, and the correlations are not consistent through childhood, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Americans Spend More on Health Care, but Fare Worse

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When compared to 12 other industrialized nations, Americans spend more on health care services, but they fare worst in terms of life expectancy, according to recent findings from The Commonwealth Fund.

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State Anti-Bullying Laws Can Reduce Bullying, Cyberbullying

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- States that get tough on bullies by enacting anti-bullying laws appear to reduce bullying and cyberbullying among high school students, a new study suggests. The report was published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Hospital Readmissions Up in Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Newborns with neonatal abstinence syndrome are more likely to be readmitted to the hospital than those without the condition, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of Hospital Pediatrics.

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Short Bursts of Intense Exercise Good for Adolescent Hearts

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health benefits for teens are achievable with just eight to 10 minutes of high-intensity exercise, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

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CDC: Hospitals Doing Better Job of Promoting Breastfeeding

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. hospitals have made significant improvements to breastfeeding support programs in recent years, providing better help to new mothers, federal health officials reported Tuesday.

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Ultrasound Diagnosis of Fetal Teratoma Very Accurate

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasonography (US) has very high sensitivity and low false-positive rates in identifying fetal teratoma prenatally, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound.

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3D Modeling Assists Evaluation of Complex Fetal Anatomy

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For the first time, three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has been used in utero to diagnose facial deformity and severity of airway risk with a newborn, according to a report published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Guidelines Developed for Managing Conflicts of Interest

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Guidelines International Network has developed principles for disclosure and management of conflicts of interest (COIs) during the clinical practice guideline development process, according to a report published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Researchers Urge Routine Screening for Child Abuse

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The early signs of child abuse among infants and toddlers -- head trauma, rib fractures, or abdominal injuries -- are often missed, and that may be due in part to a lack of standardized screening, researchers report. The findings were published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Zip Line Injuries Up Significantly in the United States

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 16,850 nonfatal zip line injuries were treated in U.S. emergency departments between 1997 and 2012, and nearly 70 percent of those injuries occurred during the last four years of that span, according to research published recently in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine.

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Flu Vaccine Benefits Extend to Fewer Pneumonia Admissions

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccination can substantially reduce the risk of hospitalizations for influenza pneumonia, according to research published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Significant Disparities in Care for Pediatric Retinoblastoma

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Significant disparities in care and outcomes exist for children with retinoblastoma, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Menstrual Preconditioning May Prevent PCOS-Tied Complications

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Menstrual preconditioning could prevent major obstetrical syndromes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), according to a clinical opinion piece published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Modified SOAP Ups Student Awareness of Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Modification of the traditional Subjective-Objective-Assessment-Plan (SOAP) presentation to consider value (SOAP-V) can help medical students learn to practice high-value, cost-conscious care, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Prevention Bundle Can Cut Rate of Pediatric SSIs

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adoption of a recommended bundle of prevention behaviors is associated with a reduction in the pediatric surgical site infection (SSI) rate, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Modern Health Care Environment Challenges Humanistic Practice

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Humanism, defined as empathy, altruism, and compassion, should be learned and taught in medical practice, according to an article published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Providers Must Understand Legal Limits of Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In order to minimize risk when practicing telemedicine, providers should ensure they hold the proper medical licenses, have medical liability insurance coverage, and communicate with patients regarding the potential risks of telemedicine, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Strategies Provided for Improving EHR Efficiency

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Several strategies can be implemented in order to better use electronic health records (EHRs) for patient care and efficiency, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Dysbiosis in Infancy Tied to Asthma Risk in Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of four types of gut bacteria in infancy may reduce a child's risk for asthma, Canadian researchers report. The new report was published online Sept. 30 in Science Translational Medicine.

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Colds, Flu Up Odds for Stroke in Children, Though Risk Is Low

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Having a cold or the flu may sometimes trigger a stroke in children -- particularly those with underlying health conditions -- though the overall risk remains low, according to a new study, published online Sept. 30 in Neurology.

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