October 2015 Briefing - Neurology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for October 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Stewardship Could Improve Appropriate Medical Imaging Use

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stewardship may be a promising approach for improving appropriate use of medical imaging technology, according to a perspective piece published in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Synchronized Prescription Renewal Process Saves Time

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A synchronized prescription renewal process can save physicians time and money, which can be dedicated to patient care, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Increasing Numbers of Med School Applicants, Enrollees

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a 25 percent increase in the number of medical school enrollees since 2002, with the number reaching an all-time high of 20,630 this year, according to a report published online Oct. 22 by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Acupuncture Improves Gait Function in Parkinson's Disease

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), acupuncture is associated with improvement in gait function, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Anorexia Nervosa Linked to Some Markers of Oxidative Stress

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some markers of oxidative stress are increased in anorexia nervosa (AN), according to a review published in the November issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Treatment of Post-Thrombolysis sICH Doesn't Lower Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of thrombolysis-related symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) does not reduce in-hospital mortality, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in JAMA Neurology.

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Nearly 15 Percent of Plans Lack In-Network Specialists

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of federal marketplace plans lack at least one in-network specialist, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Physician Emphasizes Importance of Saying Thank You

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The importance of thanking patients for coming to see you, the physician, is described in an essay published online in Medical Economics.

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Autism May Be Overdiagnosed in the United States

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As many as 9 percent of American children diagnosed with autism may not have the disorder, according to a federal government study published online Oct. 20 in Autism.

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MenB Vaccine Recommended for 16- to 23-Year-Olds

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccination is recommended for adolescents and young adults aged 16 to 23 years to provide short-term protection from most strains of serogroup B meningococcal disease, according to a report published in the Oct. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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AMA: Eight Reasons for Nonadherence to Medications

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eight reasons associated with patient's intentional nonadherence to medications have been identified in a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Resistance Training May Cut White Matter Lesion Progression

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older community-dwelling women, engaging in progressive resistance training (RT) seems to reduce white matter lesion (WML) progression, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Larger Brain Volume Associated With Mediterranean Diet

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People over 65 who eat more fish, vegetables, fruit, grains, and olive oil may have a larger brain volume than those who do not follow a Mediterranean-like diet, according to research published online Oct. 21 in Neurology.

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Outpatient Spending Higher With Physician-Hospital Integration

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Markets with greater increases in physician-hospital integration show greater increases in spending for outpatient care, but not inpatient care, for a large commercially insured population, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Influenza Vaccine Linked to Reduced Stroke Incidence

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccination is associated with reduced stroke incidence, according to a study published Oct. 5 in Vaccine.

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Peri-Op Experience Similar for Children With, Without Autism

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a significant difference in premedication type compared with children without ASD, although in other respects, their perioperative experiences are similar, according to a study published in the November issue of Pediatric Anesthesia.

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Stroke Risk Higher for People With High-Strain Jobs

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to high-strain jobs is associated with an increased risk of stroke, especially in women, according to a meta-analysis published online Oct. 14 in Neurology.

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Glucose Threshold Suggested for Neonatal Hypoglycemia

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal hypoglycemia seems not to be associated with adverse neurologic outcomes when the condition is treated to maintain a certain blood glucose concentration, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Computerized Tool Aids Cognitive Deficits in Cancer Survivors

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Computerized cognitive training improves cognitive deficits associated with pediatric cancer treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Some Changes Seen in Line With 'Choosing Wisely' Initiative

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Significant decreases in low-value services were seen in accordance with two of seven early "Choosing Wisely" recommendations, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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COPD Tied to Increased Risk of Ischemic, Hemorrhagic Stroke

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased risk of all stroke, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke, although the risks are attenuated after adjustment for smoking, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Americans Spend More on Health Care, but Fare Worse

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When compared to 12 other industrialized nations, Americans spend more on health care services, but they fare worst in terms of life expectancy, according to recent findings from The Commonwealth Fund.

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High Rate of Concussion Linked to Isolated Mandible Fractures

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of concussions associated with isolated mandible fractures is high, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Study of Daclizumab Yields Mixed Results in Multiple Sclerosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple sclerosis patients taking daclizumab high yield process (HYP), a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to CD25 (alpha subunit of the interleukin-2 receptor) and modulates interleukin-2 signaling, experienced lower relapse rates but more side effects than patients receiving interferon beta-1a, new research indicates. The study was published in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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FDA Approves Optune Device for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday expanded its approval for the Optune device to include newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

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Older Adults May Take Longer to Recover From Concussion

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults recover more slowly from concussion than younger patients, according to a small new study published online Oct. 6 in Radiology.

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Therapeutic Positioning Doesn't Affect Vital Parameters

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For severely disabled patients with central neurological disorders, therapeutic positioning does not affect vital parameters, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Guidelines Developed for Managing Conflicts of Interest

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Guidelines International Network has developed principles for disclosure and management of conflicts of interest (COIs) during the clinical practice guideline development process, according to a report published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Modified SOAP Ups Student Awareness of Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Modification of the traditional Subjective-Objective-Assessment-Plan (SOAP) presentation to consider value (SOAP-V) can help medical students learn to practice high-value, cost-conscious care, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Simvastatin, Vitamin D3 Combo Helps Prevent Migraines

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In adults with episodic migraine, the combination of simvastatin and vitamin D3 seems effective for prevention of headache, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Providers Must Understand Legal Limits of Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In order to minimize risk when practicing telemedicine, providers should ensure they hold the proper medical licenses, have medical liability insurance coverage, and communicate with patients regarding the potential risks of telemedicine, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Strategies Provided for Improving EHR Efficiency

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Several strategies can be implemented in order to better use electronic health records (EHRs) for patient care and efficiency, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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'Depression Switch' Identified During Deep Brain Stimulation

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A "depression switch" has been mapped during intraoperative deep brain stimulation of the subcallosal cingulate, according to research published online Sept. 26 in JAMA Neurology.

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Colds, Flu Up Odds for Stroke in Children, Though Risk Is Low

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Having a cold or the flu may sometimes trigger a stroke in children -- particularly those with underlying health conditions -- though the overall risk remains low, according to a new study, published online Sept. 30 in Neurology.

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