October 2015 Briefing - Nephrology

Share this content:

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nephrology for October 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Synchronized Prescription Renewal Process Saves Time

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A synchronized prescription renewal process can save physicians time and money, which can be dedicated to patient care, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Increasing Numbers of Med School Applicants, Enrollees

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a 25 percent increase in the number of medical school enrollees since 2002, with the number reaching an all-time high of 20,630 this year, according to a report published online Oct. 22 by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

More Information

Nearly 15 Percent of Plans Lack In-Network Specialists

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of federal marketplace plans lack at least one in-network specialist, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician Emphasizes Importance of Saying Thank You

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The importance of thanking patients for coming to see you, the physician, is described in an essay published online in Medical Economics.

Full Text

AMA: Eight Reasons for Nonadherence to Medications

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eight reasons associated with patient's intentional nonadherence to medications have been identified in a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Cancers Differ in Indigenous, Non-Indigenous Populations

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States, indigenous populations exhibit clear differences in the scale and profile of cancer compared to non-indigenous populations, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Outpatient Spending Higher With Physician-Hospital Integration

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Markets with greater increases in physician-hospital integration show greater increases in spending for outpatient care, but not inpatient care, for a large commercially insured population, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Sorafenib, Sunitinib May Pose Cardiovascular Risk

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older kidney cancer patients treated with sorafenib or sunitinib may face an increased risk of cardiovascular adverse events, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Americans Spend More on Health Care, but Fare Worse

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When compared to 12 other industrialized nations, Americans spend more on health care services, but they fare worst in terms of life expectancy, according to recent findings from The Commonwealth Fund.

More Information

Buffered Crystalloid Solution Doesn't Cut AKI Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients receiving crystalloid fluid therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU), the risk of acute kidney injury is similar for buffered crystalloid versus saline, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The research was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, held from Oct. 3 to 7 in Berlin.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial
More Information

Guidelines Developed for Managing Conflicts of Interest

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Guidelines International Network has developed principles for disclosure and management of conflicts of interest (COIs) during the clinical practice guideline development process, according to a report published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Reduced-Dose Tacrolimus, Everolimus Cuts CMV Infection

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection/disease is reduced in de novo kidney transplant recipients receiving reduced dose tacrolimus and everolimus, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Modified SOAP Ups Student Awareness of Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Modification of the traditional Subjective-Objective-Assessment-Plan (SOAP) presentation to consider value (SOAP-V) can help medical students learn to practice high-value, cost-conscious care, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Providers Must Understand Legal Limits of Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In order to minimize risk when practicing telemedicine, providers should ensure they hold the proper medical licenses, have medical liability insurance coverage, and communicate with patients regarding the potential risks of telemedicine, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

More Information

Height Impacts Risk of Premature Death for Dialysis Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Tall stature may be linked with an increased risk for premature death in kidney failure patients on dialysis, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Strategies Provided for Improving EHR Efficiency

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Several strategies can be implemented in order to better use electronic health records (EHRs) for patient care and efficiency, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

More Information

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease


More in Home

U.S. Teens Not Getting Enough Moderate/Vigorous Exercise

U.S. Teens Not Getting Enough Moderate/Vigorous Exercise

And bad habits continue after high school for most

Cancer Patients Have Unrealistic Hopes Entering Clinical Trials

Cancer Patients Have Unrealistic Hopes Entering Clinical Trials

Study finding is a red flag, researcher says

Increased HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex With Men

Increased HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex ...

Data from 21 jurisdictions show higher percentages with negative HIV test 12 months before diagnosis

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »