October 2015 Briefing - Internal Medicine

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Internal Medicine for October 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Chronic Pain Conditions Cost $32K Per Patient Annually

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic pain conditions pose a substantial utilization burden on the health care system, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Pain Practice.

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Stewardship Could Improve Appropriate Medical Imaging Use

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stewardship may be a promising approach for improving appropriate use of medical imaging technology, according to a perspective piece published in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Synchronized Prescription Renewal Process Saves Time

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A synchronized prescription renewal process can save physicians time and money, which can be dedicated to patient care, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Increasing Numbers of Med School Applicants, Enrollees

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a 25 percent increase in the number of medical school enrollees since 2002, with the number reaching an all-time high of 20,630 this year, according to a report published online Oct. 22 by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Acupuncture Improves Gait Function in Parkinson's Disease

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), acupuncture is associated with improvement in gait function, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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AAFP Encourages Family Doctors to Consider Prescribing Naloxone

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A resource has been produced to encourage family physicians to consider prescribing naloxone to patients, their family members, or close friends when there is a risk of opioid overdose, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

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Income Level Doesn't Substantially Impact CPAP Use

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), patient neighborhood income level is not significantly associated with purchase of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device, and the overall rate of uptake remains low, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Three Distinct Subtypes of T2DM Identified

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've identified three distinct subgroups of type 2 diabetes by reviewing the health records of more than 11,000 patients. The study findings were published in the Oct. 28 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Dry Eye Disease Often Diagnosed in Alopecia Areata

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients with alopecia areata are diagnosed with dry eye disease (DED), and patients should be referred for an ophthalmic evaluation, according to a study published in the November issue of the International Journal of Dermatology.

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Sanofi Recalls Auvi-Q Injectors Used to Treat Anaphylaxis

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- All packs of Auvi-Q injectors are being recalled in the United States as some may not deliver the correct dose of epinephrine, according to a news release issued by Sanofi on Wednesday.

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Flu Vaccine Slightly Less Effective in Patients on Statins

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two new studies raise the possibility that statins may blunt the effectiveness of flu vaccines in seniors. The research is published online Oct. 28 in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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Many Seniors May Be Overtreated for T2DM, Hypertension

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to treating seniors with diabetes, new research suggests that doctors often don't cut back on medications, even when treatment goals are surpassed. The findings were published online Oct. 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Despite Progress, Mortality Still Risk Up in Patients With T2DM

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Type 2 diabetes still substantially increases mortality risk, with the degree of risk varying with age, renal complications, and glycemic control, according to research published in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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More Prescription Opioid Addicts Are Turning to Heroin

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Concurrent use of heroin and prescription opioids is increasing, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Some RA Treatments Up Second Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with prior nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the risk of second NMSC varies with different treatments, according to a study published online Oct. 28 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Part D Enrollment Doesn't Improve Outcomes After AMI

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), enrollment in Part D by hospital discharge is not associated with improved outcomes, according to a study published online Oct. 27 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Early CT Scan Impacts Management of Suspected CAP

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Computed tomography (CT) findings affect the diagnosis and management of suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Low-Dose Rifaximin Cuts Endotoxin Level in Cirrhosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with liver cirrhosis, low-dose rifaximin is comparable to high-dose rifaximin for reducing serum endotoxin levels, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in the Journal of Digestive Diseases.

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Lidocaine, Hyaluronidase Mix Works Faster in Myofascial Pain

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), trigger point injection (TPI) with lidocaine and hyaluronidase works more quickly on the first day following injection than lidocaine alone, but there are no significant differences between the methods after four days, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Pain Practice.

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Review Supports LMWH for Cancer-Linked Incidental PE

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer-associated incidental pulmonary embolism (IPE) should be treated with low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs), according to a review published online Oct. 15 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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CDC: E-Cigarette Use Highest Among 18- to 24-Year-Olds

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 13 percent of American adults have tried electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) at least once, and 3.7 percent currently use them, according to the 2014 National Health Interview Survey by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Women More Often Treated With Low-Dose Dabigatran

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women are more often treated with low-dose dabigatran, although there is a trend toward lower stroke rates with high-dose dabigatran, according to a study published online Oct. 27 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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LABAs No Better Than Tiotropium in Black Adults With Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For black patients with asthma treated with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), outcomes are similar with addition of tiotropium and long-acting β-agonists (LABAs), according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Fatal Case of Hidradenitis Suppurativa Described

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) can be associated with infectious and/or neoplastic fatal complications, according to a case report published online Oct. 16 in the International Journal of Dermatology.

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Nearly 15 Percent of Plans Lack In-Network Specialists

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of federal marketplace plans lack at least one in-network specialist, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Case of Lactic Acidosis With Metformin, Normal Renal Function

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a case report published in the October issue of Clinical Diabetes, lactic acidosis is described in a patient with normal renal function receiving metformin for type 2 diabetes.

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Treatment of Post-Thrombolysis sICH Doesn't Lower Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of thrombolysis-related symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) does not reduce in-hospital mortality, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in JAMA Neurology.

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Low BMI Linked to Increased Risk of Progression, Death in mCRC

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients enrolled in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) trials, low body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of progression and death, according to research published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Lifestyle Factors Not Linked to Chronic Prostatitis/Pelvic Pain

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, cigarette smoking, and hypertension are not associated with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, according to a study published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Physician Emphasizes Importance of Saying Thank You

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The importance of thanking patients for coming to see you, the physician, is described in an essay published online in Medical Economics.

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Mortality Rates for Major Illnesses Fall in the United States

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer Americans are dying from cardiovascular disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, and injuries, a new study reveals. The report was published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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USPSTF Urges Broader Screening for Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians should screen overweight and obese adults between 40 and 70 years old for abnormal blood glucose levels, and should offer or refer patients with abnormal blood glucose to intensive behavioral counseling interventions, according to new recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. The new recommendations were published online Oct. 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Gender Gap Appears to Continue in Cardiovascular Care

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that doctors don't warn younger women when they're at risk for cardiovascular disease as often as they warn men. And once younger women suffer an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), they are less likely to receive revascularization and more likely to die in the hospital. The findings were reported in two separate studies published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Functional Foods Could Help With Long-Term Weight Loss

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle modification, including the use of functional foods such as fruits and vegetables, could contribute to weight loss, although evidence of positive results in humans is required, according to a review published in the November issue of Obesity Reviews.

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Continuing Mailed FOBT Program Ups CRC Screening Adherence

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Continuing a centralized mailed fecal occult blood test (FOBT) program is beneficial for improving adherence to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, according to a study published online Oct. 21 in Cancer.

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Vitamin D Supplementation Beneficial in Rheumatoid Arthritis

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with active rheumatoid arthritis and vitamin D deficiency, vitamin D supplementation is associated with improved disease activity within a short period, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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WHO: Evidence That Processed Meat Can Cause Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Processed meats, such as bacon, hot dogs, and sausages, are carcinogenic, and red meat may be as well, experts from the World Health Organization (WHO) warned on Monday. The findings were published online Oct. 26 in The Lancet Oncology.

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FDA Requires New Warning on Two Hepatitis C Drugs

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Viekira Pak and Technivie appear linked to serious liver damage in patients with advanced liver disease, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned in a statement issued Thursday.

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Inferior Care, Higher Costs for Black Men With Prostate Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older black men with prostate cancer seem more likely to receive poorer quality of care that costs more compared to white men, according to a report published online Oct. 22 in JAMA Oncology.

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Bedbugs the Culprit in Older Woman With Unidentified Rash

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a case report published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, the authors describe a case of bedbugs in an older woman who presented with an unidentified itchy rash.

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MenB Vaccine Recommended for 16- to 23-Year-Olds

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccination is recommended for adolescents and young adults aged 16 to 23 years to provide short-term protection from most strains of serogroup B meningococcal disease, according to a report published in the Oct. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Cellphone System Ups Glucose Self-Monitoring in Pregnancy

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus or type 2 diabetes, use of a cellphone-Internet technology (CIT) system, which collects and sends glucose readings directly to a cellphone, is associated with improved compliance in self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), according to a report published in the October issue of Clinical Diabetes.

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Sartans Improve Survival, Time to Recurrence in Liver Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after radiofrequency ablation, angiotensin II receptor 1 blockers (sartans) correlate with significantly improved overall survival and time to recurrence, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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AMA: Eight Reasons for Nonadherence to Medications

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eight reasons associated with patient's intentional nonadherence to medications have been identified in a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Patients' Reasons for Returning to ER Differ From Predicted

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients' reasons for returning to the emergency department after discharge from an internal medicine unit include being discharged too soon and feeling weak, and these reasons differ from those predicted by the liaison nurse clinician's evaluation, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Resistance Training May Cut White Matter Lesion Progression

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older community-dwelling women, engaging in progressive resistance training (RT) seems to reduce white matter lesion (WML) progression, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Intensive Lifestyle Intervention Improves GI Symptoms in T2DM

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) can reduce gastrointestinal symptoms among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes, according to research published in the October issue of Clinical Diabetes.

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EHR Use Ups Some Outcomes After Myocardial Infarction

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), electronic health record (EHR) implementation is associated with some improvement in outcomes, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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'Dispositional' Mindfulness May Help Ward Off Obesity

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Self-awareness may help reduce the risk of obesity, according to research published online Oct. 19 in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

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Case of Ovarian Hyperthecosis Described

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A case of ovarian hyperthecosis has been presented in the Oct. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ultrasound Highly Accurate for Diagnosing Groin Hernia

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound (US) is highly accurate for diagnosing the presence and type of groin hernia, according to a study published in the November/December issue of the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound.

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Knee, Hip Arthroplasty Tied to Increased Short-Term MI Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) for osteoarthritis, the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) is increased in the first postoperative month, according to a study published in the October issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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FDA Approves Coagadex for Rare Clotting Disorder

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Coagadex (coagulation Factor X) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the first coagulation factor replacement therapy for people with a rare blood disorder known as hereditary Factor X deficiency.

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Marijuana Use Doubles Among Americans in Past Decade

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As laws and attitudes about marijuana have relaxed in the past decade, the number of Americans who say they smoke marijuana has more than doubled, and nearly three of 10 users had a marijuana use disorder in 2012 to 2013, according to a report published online Oct. 21 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Older Blood Appears Safe for Cardiac Surgery Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac surgery patients given blood stored for more than six weeks face no greater harm than those who get blood donated within two weeks, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Opioid Added to Rx Naproxen No Help in Low Back Pain

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Naproxen alone appears to provide as much relief for low back pain as naproxen plus oxycodone/acetaminophen or cyclobenzaprine, according to research published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Low Hep B Vaccine Response Rate Linked to IBD Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), infliximab and/or azathioprine treatment is associated with poor response rate to hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Many Doctors Don't Explain Stroke, Bleeding Risk in A-Fib

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For many Canadian patients with atrial fibrillation, primary care physicians do not provide stroke or bleeding risk estimates, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

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Cancers Differ in Indigenous, Non-Indigenous Populations

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States, indigenous populations exhibit clear differences in the scale and profile of cancer compared to non-indigenous populations, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Midlife Cardiovascular Fitness Tied to Lower Health Costs Later

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher cardiorespiratory fitness in middle age is strongly associated with lower health care costs later in life, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Outpatient Spending Higher With Physician-Hospital Integration

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Markets with greater increases in physician-hospital integration show greater increases in spending for outpatient care, but not inpatient care, for a large commercially insured population, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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ACS: Annual Mammograms Should Start at Age 45

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Cancer Society is delaying the recommended age when a woman should start receiving annual mammograms, based on new research that shows the average risk for breast cancer increases near menopause. The new guidelines are published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Many Elderly CHD Patients Not Taking Statins

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High numbers of elderly patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) are not being treated with a statin, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Value of Bedside Exam for ICU Patients Discussed

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A checklist-based bedside physical examination in the intensive care unit (ICU) is suggested as clinically useful in spite of a lack of evidence demonstrating this, according to a commentary published in the October issue of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Longer QRS Duration Predicts Cardiac Death, Heart Attack

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Longer QRS duration predicts cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with coronary artery disease, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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FDA Approves Praxbind to Reverse Pradaxa's Effect

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Praxbind (idarucizumab) has been approved for use in patients who are taking the anticoagulant Pradaxa (dabigatran) when there is an urgent need to reverse Pradaxa's anticoagulant effects, according to a news release from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Excessive Drinking Cost U.S. $249 Billion in 2010

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Excessive drinking cost the United States $249 billion -- $2.05 a drink -- in 2010, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Insulin Dose Doesn't Up Mortality in ACCORD Trial

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial, insulin dose is not associated with cardiovascular (CV) death after adjustment for baseline covariates, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Diabetes Care.

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Majority of Older Adults Want Active Role in Decision Making

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A large majority of older adults prefer to participate actively in health care decisions, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Review Links Lipid Profiles With Tendon Health

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lipid profiles seem to be associated with tendon health, according to a review published online Oct. 15 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Rising Threat of Antibiotic Resistance in Surgery, Chemo

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As many as half of postsurgical infections and more than a quarter of infections after chemotherapy are caused by organisms already resistant to standard antibiotics, according to a study published Oct. 15 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Stricter Alcohol Policy Tied to Lower Rates of Cirrhosis Mortality

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- States with strong alcohol control policies have lower death rates connected to alcohol-related liver damage, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

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CDC: Prescribing Practices Key to Curbing Rx Abuse

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Improved prescribing practices could help reduce opioid abuse and overdose deaths from those drugs, according to research published in the Oct. 16 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Time-Limited Strategies Feasible for ICU Critical Cancer Care

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with poor-prognosis cancer, trials of intensive care unit (ICU) care of short duration may be sufficient, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in JAMA Oncology.

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Influenza Vaccine Linked to Reduced Stroke Incidence

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccination is associated with reduced stroke incidence, according to a study published Oct. 5 in Vaccine.

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Stroke Risk Higher for People With High-Strain Jobs

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to high-strain jobs is associated with an increased risk of stroke, especially in women, according to a meta-analysis published online Oct. 14 in Neurology.

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Age Impacts Outcomes After Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Age significantly impacts long-term outcomes after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a study published online Oct. 7 in the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

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Premixed Insulin Ups Hypoglycemia in Inpatients

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For hospitalized patients with diabetes, treatment with premixed insulin results in similar glycemic control but higher frequency of hypoglycemia compared with a basal-bolus regimen, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Lower-Income Cancer Patients Less Likely to Participate in Trials

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lower-income patients with cancer are less likely to participate in clinical trials, according to a research letter published online Oct. 15 in JAMA Oncology.

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Ebola Virus Can Persist in Semen of Survivors

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ebola virus can persist in semen, according to two reports published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Vitamin D, Calcium Don't Cut Recurrent Adenoma Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Supplemental vitamin D and calcium do not seem to reduce the risk of recurrent colorectal adenomas, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Pros and Cons of Annual Physical Discussed

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The pros and cons of the annual physical are discussed in two perspective pieces published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Lesion-Directed Screening Effectively Detects Skin Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lesion-directed screening (LDS) has a similar skin cancer detection rate as total-body examination (TBE) but is substantially less time-consuming, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in JAMA Dermatology.

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About 23,000 ER Visits/Year for Supplement-Linked Side Effects

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Every year about 23,000 U.S. emergency department visits involve adverse events related to dietary supplements, according to a special article published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Myopathy in Patient With Rx-Related Respiratory Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of nivolumab can cause adverse effects, including respiratory symptoms, according to a case study published in the October issue of The Journal of Dermatology.

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α-Tocopherol Bioavailability Lower in Metabolic Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For adults, α-tocopheraol bioavailability is unaffected by dairy fat quantity but is lower in those with metabolic syndrome (MetS), according to a study published online Oct. 7 in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Similar CV Care Quality Seen for NPs, PAs, Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Advanced practice providers (APPs), including nurse practitioners and physician assistants, deliver a quality of outpatient cardiovascular care that is similar to that provided by physicians, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Young Women Less Likely Than Men to Start Meds After AMI

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- After acute myocardial infarction (AMI), younger women are less likely than younger men to initiate prescribed medications, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Prescription Opioid Use Disorders Up From 2003 to 2013

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Trends in opioid use and treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD) are described in two studies published online Oct. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Abstract -- Saloner and Karthikeyan
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Early Physical Therapy Shows Limited Value in Low Back Pain

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with low back pain (LBP) fitting a decision rule, early physical therapy is associated with modest improvement in disability compared with usual care, but the improvement is not seen at one-year follow-up, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Some Changes Seen in Line With 'Choosing Wisely' Initiative

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Significant decreases in low-value services were seen in accordance with two of seven early "Choosing Wisely" recommendations, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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HAART Tied to Lower HBV Rate in Men Who Have Sex With Men

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For men who have sex with men (MSM), highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is associated with lower incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV), according to a study published online Oct. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Advanced-Stage Breast CA More Likely in Certain Racial Groups

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women in certain racial/ethnic groups are more likely to be diagnosed with more advanced breast cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Intervention Cuts Contamination in Protective Gear Removal

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An educational intervention can reduce contamination of the skin and clothing of health care personnel during removal of contaminated personal protective equipment (PPE), according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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ACP Provides Guidelines for Retail Health Clinics

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Retail clinics have a place in health care and should encourage the longitudinal care relationship with primary care physicians, according to a position paper published online Oct. 12 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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USPSTF Recommends High Blood Pressure Screening

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends blood pressure screening for adults and use of confirmatory blood pressure measurement outside the clinic setting. These findings form the basis of a review and recommendation statement published online Oct. 12 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Cancer Survivors Often Have Poor Dietary Quality

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer survivors tend to have worse dietary quality than the general population, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Cancer.

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Red Wine at Dinner May Reduce Cardiometabolic Risk in T2DM

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate red wine intake is safe and modestly decreases cardiometabolic risk among patients with well-controlled diabetes following the Mediterranean diet, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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COPD Tied to Increased Risk of Ischemic, Hemorrhagic Stroke

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased risk of all stroke, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke, although the risks are attenuated after adjustment for smoking, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Sorafenib, Sunitinib May Pose Cardiovascular Risk

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older kidney cancer patients treated with sorafenib or sunitinib may face an increased risk of cardiovascular adverse events, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Cancer.

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Dying at Home Brings More Peace Without More Pain

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who die at home experience more peace in their final days and hours than they would in a hospital, with no greater pain, according to findings published online Oct. 9 in BMC Medicine.

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Immediate Hypersensitivity to Raw Garlic Described

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Raw garlic can induce immediate hypersensitivity reactions, according to a letter to the editor published in the October issue of the Journal of Dermatology.

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Americans Spend More on Health Care, but Fare Worse

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When compared to 12 other industrialized nations, Americans spend more on health care services, but they fare worst in terms of life expectancy, according to recent findings from The Commonwealth Fund.

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More Severe Psoriasis Equals More Vascular Inflammation

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As the amount of psoriasis increases, the amount of vascular inflammation increases, according to research published online Oct. 8 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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Ebola Survivor's Case Points to Delayed Complications

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A British nurse who survived Ebola has been hospitalized due to a delayed complication from her infection, health officials say.

Health Highlights: Oct. 9, 2015

Two Decision Instruments ID Major Injuries in Blunt Trauma

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two decision instruments (DIs) have high sensitivity for identifying blunt trauma patients with clinically significant thoracic injuries, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in PLOS Medicine.

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Short Walk Can Restore Vascular Function After Prolonged Sitting

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even a 10-minute walk can restore vascular function in legs affected by prolonged sitting, according to findings published recently in Experimental Physiology.

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Occupational Risk of Bladder Cancer on the Rise

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Despite efforts by lawmakers and manufacturers to protect workers and provide safe working environments, the risk of bladder cancer is still rising in certain industries, according to a review published online Oct. 8 in JAMA Oncology.

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Carotenoids Help Reduce the Risk of Advanced AMD

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Carotenoids are associated with a long-term reduced risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to a study published online Oct. 8 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Troponin Cut-Off Could Help Reduce Admissions, Costs

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A cardiac troponin concentration of <5 ng/L identifies patients at very low risk of myocardial infarction (MI) either during admission or within the following 30 days, researchers report online Oct. 7 in The Lancet.

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Young Cancer Survivors May Need Lifelong Screenings

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Teen and young adult cancer survivors are at increased risk for other cancers later in life, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Cancer.

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Buffered Crystalloid Solution Doesn't Cut AKI Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients receiving crystalloid fluid therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU), the risk of acute kidney injury is similar for buffered crystalloid versus saline, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The research was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, held from Oct. 3 to 7 in Berlin.

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Bariatric Surgery Can Lead to Increased Suicide Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients who have bariatric surgery may be more likely to attempt suicide following the procedure, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in JAMA Surgery.

Abstract
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Early Detection Still Key to Breast Cancer Survival

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even with recent strides in breast cancer treatment, a woman's chances of surviving the disease still partly depend on early detection, according to research published online Oct. 6 in The BMJ.

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Being Overweight Helps Women With Heart Failure, but Not Men

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and mildly obese women with heart failure may live significantly longer than similarly heavy men with the progressive disease, according to a study published Oct. 7 in JACC: Heart Failure.

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Substantial Proportion of Revisits Post Ambulatory Sx Occur in ER

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acute care revisits occur with considerable frequency among low-risk patients undergoing ambulatory operations, with a substantial proportion of revisits occurring in emergency departments, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC: Four Deaths Linked to Latest Salmonella Outbreak

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A Salmonella outbreak that has been linked to contaminated cucumbers imported from Mexico has now caused 732 illnesses in 35 states, U.S. health officials said Tuesday.

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Prognostic Disclosure Improves Life Expectancy Estimates

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Prognostic disclosure is associated with more realistic patient expectations of life expectancy (LE) in advanced cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Low Income, Minority Status Affect Medical Care Wait Times

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks and Hispanics spend approximately 25 percent more time seeking health care than whites, and patients also spend more time in a doctor's waiting room if they're unemployed, in a low-paying job, or never attended college, according to research published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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H. Pylori Resistance to Antibiotics Increasing

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Resistance to the antibiotics clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin is high among patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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As HIV Patients Live Longer, Certain Cancer Risks Rise

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Antiretroviral therapy has extended the lives of people with HIV, but living longer may increase these patients' risk for certain cancers, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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California Governor Signs Right-to-Die Bill Into Law

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- California Gov. Jerry Brown signed "right-to-die" legislation on Monday that will allow the terminally ill to legally end their lives.

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USPSTF Recommends CRC Screening for 50- to 75-Year-Olds

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends colorectal cancer (CRC) screening starting at age 50 years and continuing through age 75 years. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement, published Oct. 5 by the USPSTF.

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Coronary Artery Calcium Score Improves CHD Risk Prediction

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Inclusion of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score improves coronary heart disease (CHD) risk prediction, while the absence of CAC reclassifies many patients as not eligible for statins, according to two studies published in the Oct. 13 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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CDC Warns of Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Surveillance of seven U.S. metropolitan areas found higher-than-expected levels of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in Atlanta, Baltimore, and New York City, according to a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Guidelines Developed for Managing Conflicts of Interest

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Guidelines International Network has developed principles for disclosure and management of conflicts of interest (COIs) during the clinical practice guideline development process, according to a report published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Flu Vaccine Benefits Extend to Fewer Pneumonia Admissions

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccination can substantially reduce the risk of hospitalizations for influenza pneumonia, according to research published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA Orders Studies on Contaminated Duodenoscopes

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Recent outbreaks of infections linked to duodenoscopes led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday to order manufacturers to conduct postmarket studies of the devices in health care facilities.

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Type of Provider Impacts Health Care Utilization in LBP

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For new entries into health care with low back pain (LBP), the provider chosen for entry is associated with future health care utilization, according to research published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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New Protein Biomarker Identified in Insulin Resistance

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Proteomic blood profiling has identified new circulating biomarkers for homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), according to a study published online Sept. 29 in Diabetes.

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Modified SOAP Ups Student Awareness of Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Modification of the traditional Subjective-Objective-Assessment-Plan (SOAP) presentation to consider value (SOAP-V) can help medical students learn to practice high-value, cost-conscious care, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Nutrigenetic-Based Diet Doesn't Increase Weight Loss

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A nutrigenetic-based diet does not increase weight loss, compared with a standard balanced diet, according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Simvastatin, Vitamin D3 Combo Helps Prevent Migraines

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In adults with episodic migraine, the combination of simvastatin and vitamin D3 seems effective for prevention of headache, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Research Supports Theory of Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with suspected nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), overall symptom severity increases with intake of small amounts of gluten, according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Providers Must Understand Legal Limits of Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In order to minimize risk when practicing telemedicine, providers should ensure they hold the proper medical licenses, have medical liability insurance coverage, and communicate with patients regarding the potential risks of telemedicine, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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No Benefit Seen With Physical Tx in Acute Lateral Epicondylitis

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients with acute lateral epicondylitis recover without physical therapy and steroid injections, according to a study published recently in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders.

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Height Impacts Risk of Premature Death for Dialysis Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Tall stature may be linked with an increased risk for premature death in kidney failure patients on dialysis, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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CPAP Eases Symptoms of Depression in OSA Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at increased risk for depression, but continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy may ease their depression symptoms, a new study suggests. The findings appear in the September issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

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Serotonin Levels Low in Ankylosing Spondylitis

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have lower serotonin levels than healthy controls and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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MRI Effectively Measures Hemochromatosis Iron Burden

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an accurate and safe tool for the detection of low levels of iron overload in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, according to a letter to the editor published online Sept. 11 in the American Journal of Hematology.

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Add-On Sitagliptin Cuts Risk of Insulin Initiation in T2DM

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with metformin, add-on sitagliptin is associated with a lower risk of insulin initiation than add-on sulphonylurea, according to a study published in the October issue of Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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CT Scans for Lung Cancer Result in Few False-Positives

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical intervention for a non-lung cancer diagnosis is rare following low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Abstract
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More Evidence Psoriasis and Depression Are Linked

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Regardless of severity, patients with psoriasis face an elevated risk for depression, new research suggests. The findings were published online Sept. 30 in JAMA Dermatology.

Abstract
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Strategies Provided for Improving EHR Efficiency

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Several strategies can be implemented in order to better use electronic health records (EHRs) for patient care and efficiency, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Too Few Women Getting Counseling Before BRCA Test

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only about one-third of women receive genetic counseling before they undergo testing for BRCA mutations, and patients who receive genetic counseling beforehand display better knowledge of the process and possible results, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in JAMA Oncology.

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'Low-Nicotine' Cigarettes May Help Smokers Quit, Smoke Less

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers are more likely to cut back or quit if they switch to cigarettes made from tobacco containing very low levels of nicotine, new research shows. The findings were published in the Oct. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Inverse Link Confirmed for Exercise, Erectile Dysfunction

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity is inversely associated with erectile dysfunction (ED), according to a confirmatory study published in the September issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Integrative Model Is Advised for Cancer Control in Primary Care

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An integrative model incorporating cancer care into primary care is recommended for addressing the increasing burden of cancer control, according to a commission piece published online Sept. 29 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Two Experimental Drugs Promising for Psoriasis Rx

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two experimental drugs, brodalumab and secukinumab, show promise in treating psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, according to two studies published in the Oct. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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