October 2015 Briefing - Gastroenterology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for October 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Synchronized Prescription Renewal Process Saves Time

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A synchronized prescription renewal process can save physicians time and money, which can be dedicated to patient care, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Increasing Numbers of Med School Applicants, Enrollees

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a 25 percent increase in the number of medical school enrollees since 2002, with the number reaching an all-time high of 20,630 this year, according to a report published online Oct. 22 by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Dose-Response Pattern for Smoking, Colorectal Neoplasm

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Colorectal neoplasm (CRN) is associated with smoking in a dose-response manner, but not with alcohol intake, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Some RA Treatments Up Second Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with prior nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the risk of second NMSC varies with different treatments, according to a study published online Oct. 28 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Low-Dose Rifaximin Cuts Endotoxin Level in Cirrhosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with liver cirrhosis, low-dose rifaximin is comparable to high-dose rifaximin for reducing serum endotoxin levels, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in the Journal of Digestive Diseases.

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Low BMI Linked to Increased Risk of Progression, Death in mCRC

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients enrolled in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) trials, low body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of progression and death, according to research published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Nearly 15 Percent of Plans Lack In-Network Specialists

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of federal marketplace plans lack at least one in-network specialist, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Physician Emphasizes Importance of Saying Thank You

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The importance of thanking patients for coming to see you, the physician, is described in an essay published online in Medical Economics.

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Continuing Mailed FOBT Program Ups CRC Screening Adherence

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Continuing a centralized mailed fecal occult blood test (FOBT) program is beneficial for improving adherence to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, according to a study published online Oct. 21 in Cancer.

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Direct-Acting Antiviral Therapies Beneficial in HCV-MCS

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapies are associated with high sustained virologic response rates in hepatitis C virus-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome (HCV-MCS), according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Hepatology.

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WHO: Evidence That Processed Meat Can Cause Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Processed meats, such as bacon, hot dogs, and sausages, are carcinogenic, and red meat may be as well, experts from the World Health Organization (WHO) warned on Monday. The findings were published online Oct. 26 in The Lancet Oncology.

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FDA Requires New Warning on Two Hepatitis C Drugs

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Viekira Pak and Technivie appear linked to serious liver damage in patients with advanced liver disease, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned in a statement issued Thursday.

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Sartans Improve Survival, Time to Recurrence in Liver Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after radiofrequency ablation, angiotensin II receptor 1 blockers (sartans) correlate with significantly improved overall survival and time to recurrence, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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AMA: Eight Reasons for Nonadherence to Medications

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eight reasons associated with patient's intentional nonadherence to medications have been identified in a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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FDA Approves Onivyde for Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Onivyde (irinotecan liposome injection) to be used in combination with fluorouracil and leucovorin in advanced pancreatic cancer.

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Intensive Lifestyle Intervention Improves GI Symptoms in T2DM

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) can reduce gastrointestinal symptoms among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes, according to research published in the October issue of Clinical Diabetes.

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Low Hep B Vaccine Response Rate Linked to IBD Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), infliximab and/or azathioprine treatment is associated with poor response rate to hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Cancers Differ in Indigenous, Non-Indigenous Populations

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States, indigenous populations exhibit clear differences in the scale and profile of cancer compared to non-indigenous populations, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Outpatient Spending Higher With Physician-Hospital Integration

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Markets with greater increases in physician-hospital integration show greater increases in spending for outpatient care, but not inpatient care, for a large commercially insured population, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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SNORA42 Identified as Novel Oncogene in Colorectal Cancer

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), SNORA42 seems to be a novel oncogene that can predict recurrence and prognosis, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in Gut.

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Stricter Alcohol Policy Tied to Lower Rates of Cirrhosis Mortality

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- States with strong alcohol control policies have lower death rates connected to alcohol-related liver damage, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Vitamin D, Calcium Don't Cut Recurrent Adenoma Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Supplemental vitamin D and calcium do not seem to reduce the risk of recurrent colorectal adenomas, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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L. reuteri Enrichment of Gut Microbiota Ups Insulin Secretion

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Enrichment of gut microbiota with Lactobacillus reuteri is associated with increased insulin secretion, according to a study published in the October issue of Diabetes Care.

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Americans Spend More on Health Care, but Fare Worse

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When compared to 12 other industrialized nations, Americans spend more on health care services, but they fare worst in terms of life expectancy, according to recent findings from The Commonwealth Fund.

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Young Cancer Survivors May Need Lifelong Screenings

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Teen and young adult cancer survivors are at increased risk for other cancers later in life, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Cancer.

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Extended RAS Testing Urged Before EGFR MoAB Therapy

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAB) therapy should be considered only after extended RAS testing, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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CDC: Four Deaths Linked to Latest Salmonella Outbreak

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A Salmonella outbreak that has been linked to contaminated cucumbers imported from Mexico has now caused 732 illnesses in 35 states, U.S. health officials said Tuesday.

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Low Income, Minority Status Affect Medical Care Wait Times

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks and Hispanics spend approximately 25 percent more time seeking health care than whites, and patients also spend more time in a doctor's waiting room if they're unemployed, in a low-paying job, or never attended college, according to research published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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H. Pylori Resistance to Antibiotics Increasing

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Resistance to the antibiotics clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin is high among patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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CO2 Insufflation Beneficial During Colonoscopy

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflation during colonoscopy is associated with reduced post-colonoscopy abdominal discomfort and improved patient satisfaction, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Outcomes Favor Colon Resection in Perforated Diverticulitis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Laparoscopic lavage leads to worse outcomes than primary resection in patients with perforated diverticulitis, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Laparoscopic Surgery May Not Be Best Option for Rectal Cancer

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Minimally invasive surgery does not match standard surgery for the treatment of rectal cancer, according to two studies published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Guidelines Developed for Managing Conflicts of Interest

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Guidelines International Network has developed principles for disclosure and management of conflicts of interest (COIs) during the clinical practice guideline development process, according to a report published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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USPSTF Recommends CRC Screening for 50- to 75-Year-Olds

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends colorectal cancer (CRC) screening starting at age 50 years and continuing through age 75 years. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement, published Oct. 5 by the USPSTF.

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FDA Orders Studies on Contaminated Duodenoscopes

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Recent outbreaks of infections linked to duodenoscopes led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday to order manufacturers to conduct postmarket studies of the devices in health care facilities.

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Nutrigenetic-Based Diet Doesn't Increase Weight Loss

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A nutrigenetic-based diet does not increase weight loss, compared with a standard balanced diet, according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Modified SOAP Ups Student Awareness of Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Modification of the traditional Subjective-Objective-Assessment-Plan (SOAP) presentation to consider value (SOAP-V) can help medical students learn to practice high-value, cost-conscious care, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Research Supports Theory of Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with suspected nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), overall symptom severity increases with intake of small amounts of gluten, according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Providers Must Understand Legal Limits of Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In order to minimize risk when practicing telemedicine, providers should ensure they hold the proper medical licenses, have medical liability insurance coverage, and communicate with patients regarding the potential risks of telemedicine, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Strategies Provided for Improving EHR Efficiency

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Several strategies can be implemented in order to better use electronic health records (EHRs) for patient care and efficiency, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Probiotics Reduce Rate of Infection After Liver Transplant

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Liver transplant recipients have a lower rate of infection with receipt of prebiotics and probiotics before surgery, according to a meta-analysis published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Dysbiosis in Infancy Tied to Asthma Risk in Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of four types of gut bacteria in infancy may reduce a child's risk for asthma, Canadian researchers report. The new report was published online Sept. 30 in Science Translational Medicine.

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