October 2015 Briefing - Family Practice

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for October 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Chronic Pain Conditions Cost $32K Per Patient Annually

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic pain conditions pose a substantial utilization burden on the health care system, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Pain Practice.

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Synchronized Prescription Renewal Process Saves Time

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A synchronized prescription renewal process can save physicians time and money, which can be dedicated to patient care, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Stewardship Could Improve Appropriate Medical Imaging Use

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stewardship may be a promising approach for improving appropriate use of medical imaging technology, according to a perspective piece published in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Doctors May Wait Too Long to Up Rx for Severe Acne

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients with severe acne remain on antibiotics too long before they are prescribed more effective medication, according to research published online Oct. 30 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Three Distinct Subtypes of T2DM Identified

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've identified three distinct subgroups of type 2 diabetes by reviewing the health records of more than 11,000 patients. The study findings were published in the Oct. 28 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Dry Eye Disease Often Diagnosed in Alopecia Areata

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients with alopecia areata are diagnosed with dry eye disease (DED), and patients should be referred for an ophthalmic evaluation, according to a study published in the November issue of the International Journal of Dermatology.

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Increasing Numbers of Med School Applicants, Enrollees

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a 25 percent increase in the number of medical school enrollees since 2002, with the number reaching an all-time high of 20,630 this year, according to a report published online Oct. 22 by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Anorexia Nervosa Linked to Some Markers of Oxidative Stress

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some markers of oxidative stress are increased in anorexia nervosa (AN), according to a review published in the November issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Acupuncture Improves Gait Function in Parkinson's Disease

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), acupuncture is associated with improvement in gait function, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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AAFP Encourages Family Doctors to Consider Prescribing Naloxone

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A resource has been produced to encourage family physicians to consider prescribing naloxone to patients, their family members, or close friends when there is a risk of opioid overdose, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

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Income Level Doesn't Substantially Impact CPAP Use

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), patient neighborhood income level is not significantly associated with purchase of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device, and the overall rate of uptake remains low, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Many Seniors May Be Overtreated for T2DM, Hypertension

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to treating seniors with diabetes, new research suggests that doctors often don't cut back on medications, even when treatment goals are surpassed. The findings were published online Oct. 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Flu Vaccine Slightly Less Effective in Patients on Statins

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two new studies raise the possibility that statins may blunt the effectiveness of flu vaccines in seniors. The research is published online Oct. 28 in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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Sanofi Recalls Auvi-Q Injectors Used to Treat Anaphylaxis

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- All packs of Auvi-Q injectors are being recalled in the United States as some may not deliver the correct dose of epinephrine, according to a news release issued by Sanofi on Wednesday.

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CDC: Not Enough Young Girls Getting HPV Vaccination

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates among American girls remain too low, according to research published in the Oct. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Despite Progress, Mortality Still Risk Up in Patients With T2DM

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Type 2 diabetes still substantially increases mortality risk, with the degree of risk varying with age, renal complications, and glycemic control, according to research published in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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More Prescription Opioid Addicts Are Turning to Heroin

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Concurrent use of heroin and prescription opioids is increasing, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Some RA Treatments Up Second Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with prior nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the risk of second NMSC varies with different treatments, according to a study published online Oct. 28 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Part D Enrollment Doesn't Improve Outcomes After AMI

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), enrollment in Part D by hospital discharge is not associated with improved outcomes, according to a study published online Oct. 27 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Early CT Scan Impacts Management of Suspected CAP

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Computed tomography (CT) findings affect the diagnosis and management of suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Lidocaine, Hyaluronidase Mix Works Faster in Myofascial Pain

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), trigger point injection (TPI) with lidocaine and hyaluronidase works more quickly on the first day following injection than lidocaine alone, but there are no significant differences between the methods after four days, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Pain Practice.

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State Abusive Head Trauma Program Didn't Reduce Injuries

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A program designed to prevent abusive head trauma in North Carolina didn't reduce rates of infant head injuries related to the abuse, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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CDC: E-Cigarette Use Highest Among 18- to 24-Year-Olds

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 13 percent of American adults have tried electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) at least once, and 3.7 percent currently use them, according to the 2014 National Health Interview Survey by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Women More Often Treated With Low-Dose Dabigatran

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women are more often treated with low-dose dabigatran, although there is a trend toward lower stroke rates with high-dose dabigatran, according to a study published online Oct. 27 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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LABAs No Better Than Tiotropium in Black Adults With Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For black patients with asthma treated with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), outcomes are similar with addition of tiotropium and long-acting β-agonists (LABAs), according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Case of Lactic Acidosis With Metformin, Normal Renal Function

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a case report published in the October issue of Clinical Diabetes, lactic acidosis is described in a patient with normal renal function receiving metformin for type 2 diabetes.

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Nearly 15 Percent of Plans Lack In-Network Specialists

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of federal marketplace plans lack at least one in-network specialist, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Lifestyle Factors Not Linked to Chronic Prostatitis/Pelvic Pain

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, cigarette smoking, and hypertension are not associated with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, according to a study published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Physician Emphasizes Importance of Saying Thank You

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The importance of thanking patients for coming to see you, the physician, is described in an essay published online in Medical Economics.

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Mortality Rates for Major Illnesses Fall in the United States

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer Americans are dying from cardiovascular disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, and injuries, a new study reveals. The report was published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Rapid Health Benefits Seen With Sugar Reduction in Children

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cutting most of the sugar from a child's diet can rapidly improve metabolic health, even if the diet still contains the same amount of calories and carbohydrates as before, a new study suggests. The study was published online Oct. 26 in Obesity.

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USPSTF Urges Broader Screening for Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians should screen overweight and obese adults between 40 and 70 years old for abnormal blood glucose levels, and should offer or refer patients with abnormal blood glucose to intensive behavioral counseling interventions, according to new recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. The new recommendations were published online Oct. 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Gender Gap Appears to Continue in Cardiovascular Care

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that doctors don't warn younger women when they're at risk for cardiovascular disease as often as they warn men. And once younger women suffer an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), they are less likely to receive revascularization and more likely to die in the hospital. The findings were reported in two separate studies published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Functional Foods Could Help With Long-Term Weight Loss

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle modification, including the use of functional foods such as fruits and vegetables, could contribute to weight loss, although evidence of positive results in humans is required, according to a review published in the November issue of Obesity Reviews.

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Continuing Mailed FOBT Program Ups CRC Screening Adherence

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Continuing a centralized mailed fecal occult blood test (FOBT) program is beneficial for improving adherence to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, according to a study published online Oct. 21 in Cancer.

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ADHD Meds Up Cardiac Event Risk in Long-QT Syndrome

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with long-QT syndrome (LQTS) treated with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications have an increased risk for cardiac events, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

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Autism May Be Overdiagnosed in the United States

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As many as 9 percent of American children diagnosed with autism may not have the disorder, according to a federal government study published online Oct. 20 in Autism.

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CDC: Too Few Male Adolescents Receiving HPV Vaccine

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most male adolescents in the United States aren't receiving the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine alongside their other scheduled inoculations, largely because doctors fail to recommend it or adequately explain its benefits to parents, according to a report published online Oct. 26 in Pediatrics.

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WHO: Evidence That Processed Meat Can Cause Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Processed meats, such as bacon, hot dogs, and sausages, are carcinogenic, and red meat may be as well, experts from the World Health Organization (WHO) warned on Monday. The findings were published online Oct. 26 in The Lancet Oncology.

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MenB Vaccine Recommended for 16- to 23-Year-Olds

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccination is recommended for adolescents and young adults aged 16 to 23 years to provide short-term protection from most strains of serogroup B meningococcal disease, according to a report published in the Oct. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Inferior Care, Higher Costs for Black Men With Prostate Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older black men with prostate cancer seem more likely to receive poorer quality of care that costs more compared to white men, according to a report published online Oct. 22 in JAMA Oncology.

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Bedbugs the Culprit in Older Woman With Unidentified Rash

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a case report published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, the authors describe a case of bedbugs in an older woman who presented with an unidentified itchy rash.

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Cellphone System Ups Glucose Self-Monitoring in Pregnancy

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus or type 2 diabetes, use of a cellphone-Internet technology (CIT) system, which collects and sends glucose readings directly to a cellphone, is associated with improved compliance in self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), according to a report published in the October issue of Clinical Diabetes.

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AMA: Eight Reasons for Nonadherence to Medications

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eight reasons associated with patient's intentional nonadherence to medications have been identified in a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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ACOG: Operative Vaginal Delivery Remains Appropriate

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Operative vaginal delivery remains an important component of modern labor management, but obstetric care providers need to be familiar with the proper use of the instruments and the risks involved, according to a practice bulletin published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Resistance Training May Cut White Matter Lesion Progression

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older community-dwelling women, engaging in progressive resistance training (RT) seems to reduce white matter lesion (WML) progression, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Yoga Intervention Ups Sleep Quality for Staff Nurses

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For staff nurses, a regular yoga intervention can improve sleep quality and reduce work stress, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Patients' Reasons for Returning to ER Differ From Predicted

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients' reasons for returning to the emergency department after discharge from an internal medicine unit include being discharged too soon and feeling weak, and these reasons differ from those predicted by the liaison nurse clinician's evaluation, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Childhood Antibiotics Rx Tied to Weight Gain Through Adolescence

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Repeated antibiotic use is linked to greater weight gains in children, and it could affect their weight for the rest of their lives, a new study suggests. The findings were published online Oct. 21 in the International Journal of Obesity.

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Intensive Lifestyle Intervention Improves GI Symptoms in T2DM

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) can reduce gastrointestinal symptoms among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes, according to research published in the October issue of Clinical Diabetes.

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AC Joint Dislocation Heals Well Without Surgery

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There is no clear evidence that operative treatment improves short-term outcome for complete acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation, according to research published in the November issue of the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma.

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EHR Use Ups Some Outcomes After Myocardial Infarction

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), electronic health record (EHR) implementation is associated with some improvement in outcomes, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Secondhand Smoke in Infancy May Harm Children's Teeth

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children exposed to secondhand smoke at 4 months of age may be at risk for tooth decay by age 3, according to research published online Oct. 21 in The BMJ.

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Larger Brain Volume Associated With Mediterranean Diet

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People over 65 who eat more fish, vegetables, fruit, grains, and olive oil may have a larger brain volume than those who do not follow a Mediterranean-like diet, according to research published online Oct. 21 in Neurology.

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'Dispositional' Mindfulness May Help Ward Off Obesity

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Self-awareness may help reduce the risk of obesity, according to research published online Oct. 19 in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

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Case of Ovarian Hyperthecosis Described

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A case of ovarian hyperthecosis has been presented in the Oct. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Pain Relief, Function Up Post Knee Replacement in Arthritis

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Total knee replacement usually results in greater pain relief and better joint function after a year than nonsurgical osteoarthritis treatment, researchers report in the Oct. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Smoke Exposure in Infancy Ups Sensitization to Food Allergens

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) in infancy is associated with increased risk of sensitization to food allergens up to age 16 years, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in Allergy.

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Many Doctors Inconsistent With HPV Vaccine Recommendations

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians are inconsistent or behind schedule in their recommendations for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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High-Dose Metformin Linked to Increases in Child Height

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Metformin use at high doses seems to be associated with increases in height among children, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Ultrasound Highly Accurate for Diagnosing Groin Hernia

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound (US) is highly accurate for diagnosing the presence and type of groin hernia, according to a study published in the November/December issue of the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound.

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Knee, Hip Arthroplasty Tied to Increased Short-Term MI Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) for osteoarthritis, the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) is increased in the first postoperative month, according to a study published in the October issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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FDA Approves Coagadex for Rare Clotting Disorder

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Coagadex (coagulation Factor X) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the first coagulation factor replacement therapy for people with a rare blood disorder known as hereditary Factor X deficiency.

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Marijuana Use Doubles Among Americans in Past Decade

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As laws and attitudes about marijuana have relaxed in the past decade, the number of Americans who say they smoke marijuana has more than doubled, and nearly three of 10 users had a marijuana use disorder in 2012 to 2013, according to a report published online Oct. 21 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Opioid Added to Rx Naproxen No Help in Low Back Pain

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Naproxen alone appears to provide as much relief for low back pain as naproxen plus oxycodone/acetaminophen or cyclobenzaprine, according to research published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Tdap Appears Safe in Pregnancy Even With Recent Tetanus Shot

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even if a woman gets a tetanus-containing shot before she conceives, it is still safe to give her the tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine while she is pregnant, new research indicates. The study was published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Many Doctors Don't Explain Stroke, Bleeding Risk in A-Fib

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For many Canadian patients with atrial fibrillation, primary care physicians do not provide stroke or bleeding risk estimates, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

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Cancers Differ in Indigenous, Non-Indigenous Populations

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States, indigenous populations exhibit clear differences in the scale and profile of cancer compared to non-indigenous populations, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Midlife Cardiovascular Fitness Tied to Lower Health Costs Later

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher cardiorespiratory fitness in middle age is strongly associated with lower health care costs later in life, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Outpatient Spending Higher With Physician-Hospital Integration

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Markets with greater increases in physician-hospital integration show greater increases in spending for outpatient care, but not inpatient care, for a large commercially insured population, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Gestational, Post-Delivery Weight Gain Linked to Child's Weight

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal gestational weight gain (GWG) and post-delivery weight gain are independently associated with a child's weight development, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Preeclampsia Tied to Congenital Heart Defects

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Preeclampsia may increase risk of congenital heart defects, according to research published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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ACS: Annual Mammograms Should Start at Age 45

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Cancer Society is delaying the recommended age when a woman should start receiving annual mammograms, based on new research that shows the average risk for breast cancer increases near menopause. The new guidelines are published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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AAP: Alcohol Leading Preventable Cause of Birth Defects, Disability

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- No amount of alcohol should be considered safe to drink during any trimester of pregnancy, according to a clinical report published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Many Elderly CHD Patients Not Taking Statins

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High numbers of elderly patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) are not being treated with a statin, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Opioid Prescriptions Common With Fibromyalgia

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid use is widespread among patients with newly diagnosed fibromyalgia, and patients taking opioids have a decreased likelihood of receiving guideline-recommended medications, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Pain Practice.

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Value of Bedside Exam for ICU Patients Discussed

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A checklist-based bedside physical examination in the intensive care unit (ICU) is suggested as clinically useful in spite of a lack of evidence demonstrating this, according to a commentary published in the October issue of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Methicillin-Susceptible Staph Strain Causes More Infections

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Invasive methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infections are more common than invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Longer QRS Duration Predicts Cardiac Death, Heart Attack

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Longer QRS duration predicts cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with coronary artery disease, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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FDA Approves Praxbind to Reverse Pradaxa's Effect

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Praxbind (idarucizumab) has been approved for use in patients who are taking the anticoagulant Pradaxa (dabigatran) when there is an urgent need to reverse Pradaxa's anticoagulant effects, according to a news release from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Depressive Symptoms Common Among Youths With Diabetes

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There are more youths with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) reporting depressive symptoms than there are depression diagnoses in this population, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Majority of Older Adults Want Active Role in Decision Making

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A large majority of older adults prefer to participate actively in health care decisions, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Possible Association for Bortezomib Therapy, Chalazia

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There is a possible correlation between bortezomib use and chalazia, according to a report published online Oct. 15 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Only Some Energy Drinks Change Endothelial Function

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some energy drinks appear to significantly improve endothelial function, while other energy drinks and coffee do not, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Excessive Drinking Cost U.S. $249 Billion in 2010

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Excessive drinking cost the United States $249 billion -- $2.05 a drink -- in 2010, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Greater Breast CA-Specific Distress for Girls With Family Hx

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Girls from families with a history of breast cancer experience greater breast cancer-specific distress, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Insulin Dose Doesn't Up Mortality in ACCORD Trial

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial, insulin dose is not associated with cardiovascular (CV) death after adjustment for baseline covariates, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Diabetes Care.

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Stricter Alcohol Policy Tied to Lower Rates of Cirrhosis Mortality

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- States with strong alcohol control policies have lower death rates connected to alcohol-related liver damage, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

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CDC: Prescribing Practices Key to Curbing Rx Abuse

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Improved prescribing practices could help reduce opioid abuse and overdose deaths from those drugs, according to research published in the Oct. 16 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Review Links Lipid Profiles With Tendon Health

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lipid profiles seem to be associated with tendon health, according to a review published online Oct. 15 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Hormonal Contraceptives Safe After Complete Hydatidiform Mole

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The use of current hormonal contraceptives (HC) can safely prevent new conception after complete hydatidiform mole (CHM) irrespective of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) level, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Patterns of Pediatric Mandible Fx Vary With Age, Sex

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The patterns of pediatric mandible fracture vary with age and sex, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Influenza Vaccine Linked to Reduced Stroke Incidence

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccination is associated with reduced stroke incidence, according to a study published Oct. 5 in Vaccine.

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Peri-Op Experience Similar for Children With, Without Autism

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a significant difference in premedication type compared with children without ASD, although in other respects, their perioperative experiences are similar, according to a study published in the November issue of Pediatric Anesthesia.

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Review: Maternal Flu Shot Doesn't Up Congenital Anomalies

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal influenza vaccination is not associated with increased risk of congenital anomalies, according to a review published online Oct. 7 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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CDC: Teen Smoking Down, Marijuana Use Up

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although new statistics show that smoking among American teenagers has dropped 64 percent in recent years, the same report also shows that marijuana use has doubled. The report was published Oct. 16 in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).

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Age Impacts Outcomes After Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Age significantly impacts long-term outcomes after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a study published online Oct. 7 in the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

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Stroke Risk Higher for People With High-Strain Jobs

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to high-strain jobs is associated with an increased risk of stroke, especially in women, according to a meta-analysis published online Oct. 14 in Neurology.

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Comprehensive Prevention Program Cuts Suicide Attempts

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The comprehensive Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Suicide Prevention Program (GLS program) is associated with a reduction in suicide attempts among youths, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Glucose Threshold Suggested for Neonatal Hypoglycemia

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal hypoglycemia seems not to be associated with adverse neurologic outcomes when the condition is treated to maintain a certain blood glucose concentration, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Lesion-Directed Screening Effectively Detects Skin Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lesion-directed screening (LDS) has a similar skin cancer detection rate as total-body examination (TBE) but is substantially less time-consuming, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Pros and Cons of Annual Physical Discussed

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The pros and cons of the annual physical are discussed in two perspective pieces published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Community-Based Intervention Ups HIV Testing in Pregnancy

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A community-based intervention that includes health education and on-site laboratory testing can increase uptake of HIV testing in pregnant women in southeast Nigeria, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the The Lancet Global Health.

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Vitamin D, Calcium Don't Cut Recurrent Adenoma Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Supplemental vitamin D and calcium do not seem to reduce the risk of recurrent colorectal adenomas, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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About 23,000 ER Visits/Year for Supplement-Linked Side Effects

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Every year about 23,000 U.S. emergency department visits involve adverse events related to dietary supplements, according to a special article published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Metronome Can Improve Rate of Compressions in Pediatric CPR

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of chest compressions during CPR can be optimized by the use of a metronome, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Myopathy in Patient With Rx-Related Respiratory Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of nivolumab can cause adverse effects, including respiratory symptoms, according to a case study published in the October issue of The Journal of Dermatology.

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Coadministering Tdap, Flu Vaccines Safe in Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Coadministering tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) and influenza vaccines appears safe in pregnancy, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Epidural-Related Complications Down for C-Sections

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Complications from epidural and spinal anesthetic procedures during cesarean deliveries dropped 25 percent over a recent 10-year period, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in Anesthesiology.

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Young Women Less Likely Than Men to Start Meds After AMI

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- After acute myocardial infarction (AMI), younger women are less likely than younger men to initiate prescribed medications, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Similar CV Care Quality Seen for NPs, PAs, Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Advanced practice providers (APPs), including nurse practitioners and physician assistants, deliver a quality of outpatient cardiovascular care that is similar to that provided by physicians, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Enterovirus D68 Doesn't Raise Mortality Risk in Children

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) seems to be a more virulent pulmonary pathogen in children than rhinovirus or non-EV-D68 enterovirus, but it does not increase the risk of death, according to a study published Oct. 13 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Prescription Opioid Use Disorders Up From 2003 to 2013

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Trends in opioid use and treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD) are described in two studies published online Oct. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Early Physical Therapy Shows Limited Value in Low Back Pain

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with low back pain (LBP) fitting a decision rule, early physical therapy is associated with modest improvement in disability compared with usual care, but the improvement is not seen at one-year follow-up, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Lithium Safe, Effective for Bipolar I Disorder in Children

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lithium safely and effectively reduces manic symptoms in pediatric patients treated for bipolar I disorder (BP-I), according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Maternal Glucose Levels Linked to Two CHD Phenotypes

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal midpregnancy measures of glucose and insulin are associated with two different congenital heart disease (CHD) phenotypes, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Racial Disparity Seen in Childbirth-Related Readmission

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Black and Hispanic women have significantly higher readmission rates than white women after childbirth, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Red Wine at Dinner May Reduce Cardiometabolic Risk in T2DM

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate red wine intake is safe and modestly decreases cardiometabolic risk among patients with well-controlled diabetes following the Mediterranean diet, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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USPSTF Recommends High Blood Pressure Screening

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends blood pressure screening for adults and use of confirmatory blood pressure measurement outside the clinic setting. These findings form the basis of a review and recommendation statement published online Oct. 12 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Cancer Survivors Often Have Poor Dietary Quality

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer survivors tend to have worse dietary quality than the general population, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Cancer.

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ACP Provides Guidelines for Retail Health Clinics

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Retail clinics have a place in health care and should encourage the longitudinal care relationship with primary care physicians, according to a position paper published online Oct. 12 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Intervention Cuts Contamination in Protective Gear Removal

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An educational intervention can reduce contamination of the skin and clothing of health care personnel during removal of contaminated personal protective equipment (PPE), according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Advanced-Stage Breast CA More Likely in Certain Racial Groups

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women in certain racial/ethnic groups are more likely to be diagnosed with more advanced breast cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Some Changes Seen in Line With 'Choosing Wisely' Initiative

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Significant decreases in low-value services were seen in accordance with two of seven early "Choosing Wisely" recommendations, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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HAART Tied to Lower HBV Rate in Men Who Have Sex With Men

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For men who have sex with men (MSM), highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is associated with lower incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV), according to a study published online Oct. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Dying at Home Brings More Peace Without More Pain

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who die at home experience more peace in their final days and hours than they would in a hospital, with no greater pain, according to findings published online Oct. 9 in BMC Medicine.

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One-Third of Children See PCPs for Mental Health Conditions

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care providers (PCPs) are the sole physician managers for more than one-third of children receiving mental health care, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Few Physical, Socio-Emotional Outcomes for C-Section

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cesarean section seems to be associated with few physical and socio-emotional outcomes, and the correlations are not consistent through childhood, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Sex May Boost Female Immune System to Aid Fertility

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sex at any time in a woman's menstrual cycle may trigger immune system changes that boost the likelihood of getting pregnant, a new study suggests. The findings were published recently in the journals Fertility and Sterility and Physiology and Behavior.

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Americans Spend More on Health Care, but Fare Worse

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When compared to 12 other industrialized nations, Americans spend more on health care services, but they fare worst in terms of life expectancy, according to recent findings from The Commonwealth Fund.

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Immediate Hypersensitivity to Raw Garlic Described

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Raw garlic can induce immediate hypersensitivity reactions, according to a letter to the editor published in the October issue of the Journal of Dermatology.

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More Severe Psoriasis Equals More Vascular Inflammation

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As the amount of psoriasis increases, the amount of vascular inflammation increases, according to research published online Oct. 8 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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State Anti-Bullying Laws Can Reduce Bullying, Cyberbullying

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- States that get tough on bullies by enacting anti-bullying laws appear to reduce bullying and cyberbullying among high school students, a new study suggests. The report was published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Ebola Survivor's Case Points to Delayed Complications

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A British nurse who survived Ebola has been hospitalized due to a delayed complication from her infection, health officials say.

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Hospital Readmissions Up in Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Newborns with neonatal abstinence syndrome are more likely to be readmitted to the hospital than those without the condition, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of Hospital Pediatrics.

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Carotenoids Help Reduce the Risk of Advanced AMD

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Carotenoids are associated with a long-term reduced risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to a study published online Oct. 8 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Occupational Risk of Bladder Cancer on the Rise

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Despite efforts by lawmakers and manufacturers to protect workers and provide safe working environments, the risk of bladder cancer is still rising in certain industries, according to a review published online Oct. 8 in JAMA Oncology.

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Short Walk Can Restore Vascular Function After Prolonged Sitting

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even a 10-minute walk can restore vascular function in legs affected by prolonged sitting, according to findings published recently in Experimental Physiology.

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Two Decision Instruments ID Major Injuries in Blunt Trauma

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two decision instruments (DIs) have high sensitivity for identifying blunt trauma patients with clinically significant thoracic injuries, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in PLOS Medicine.

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High Rate of Concussion Linked to Isolated Mandible Fractures

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of concussions associated with isolated mandible fractures is high, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Troponin Cut-Off Could Help Reduce Admissions, Costs

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A cardiac troponin concentration of <5 ng/L identifies patients at very low risk of myocardial infarction (MI) either during admission or within the following 30 days, researchers report online Oct. 7 in The Lancet.

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Young Cancer Survivors May Need Lifelong Screenings

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Teen and young adult cancer survivors are at increased risk for other cancers later in life, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Cancer.

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Bariatric Surgery Can Lead to Increased Suicide Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients who have bariatric surgery may be more likely to attempt suicide following the procedure, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in JAMA Surgery.

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Being Overweight Helps Women With Heart Failure, but Not Men

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and mildly obese women with heart failure may live significantly longer than similarly heavy men with the progressive disease, according to a study published Oct. 7 in JACC: Heart Failure.

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Early Detection Still Key to Breast Cancer Survival

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even with recent strides in breast cancer treatment, a woman's chances of surviving the disease still partly depend on early detection, according to research published online Oct. 6 in The BMJ.

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Short Bursts of Intense Exercise Good for Adolescent Hearts

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health benefits for teens are achievable with just eight to 10 minutes of high-intensity exercise, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

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Substantial Proportion of Revisits Post Ambulatory Sx Occur in ER

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acute care revisits occur with considerable frequency among low-risk patients undergoing ambulatory operations, with a substantial proportion of revisits occurring in emergency departments, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Ovarian Tissue Transplant Can Up Fertility Post Cancer Tx

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For cancer survivors, ovarian tissue transplants are safe and effective and pose little risk of cancer recurrence, according to a report published online Oct. 6 in Human Reproduction.

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CDC: Hospitals Doing Better Job of Promoting Breastfeeding

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. hospitals have made significant improvements to breastfeeding support programs in recent years, providing better help to new mothers, federal health officials reported Tuesday.

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CDC: Four Deaths Linked to Latest Salmonella Outbreak

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A Salmonella outbreak that has been linked to contaminated cucumbers imported from Mexico has now caused 732 illnesses in 35 states, U.S. health officials said Tuesday.

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Rehab Not Necessary for Uncomplicated Ankle Fracture

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A supervised exercise program does not confer additional benefits in activity limitation or quality of life compared with advice alone for patients with isolated and uncomplicated ankle fracture, according to research published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Prognostic Disclosure Improves Life Expectancy Estimates

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Prognostic disclosure is associated with more realistic patient expectations of life expectancy (LE) in advanced cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Low Income, Minority Status Affect Medical Care Wait Times

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks and Hispanics spend approximately 25 percent more time seeking health care than whites, and patients also spend more time in a doctor's waiting room if they're unemployed, in a low-paying job, or never attended college, according to research published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Older Adults May Take Longer to Recover From Concussion

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults recover more slowly from concussion than younger patients, according to a small new study published online Oct. 6 in Radiology.

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Ultrasound Diagnosis of Fetal Teratoma Very Accurate

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasonography (US) has very high sensitivity and low false-positive rates in identifying fetal teratoma prenatally, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound.

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H. Pylori Resistance to Antibiotics Increasing

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Resistance to the antibiotics clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin is high among patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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As HIV Patients Live Longer, Certain Cancer Risks Rise

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Antiretroviral therapy has extended the lives of people with HIV, but living longer may increase these patients' risk for certain cancers, according to a study published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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California Governor Signs Right-to-Die Bill Into Law

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- California Gov. Jerry Brown signed "right-to-die" legislation on Monday that will allow the terminally ill to legally end their lives.

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USPSTF Recommends CRC Screening for 50- to 75-Year-Olds

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends colorectal cancer (CRC) screening starting at age 50 years and continuing through age 75 years. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement, published Oct. 5 by the USPSTF.

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Researchers Urge Routine Screening for Child Abuse

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The early signs of child abuse among infants and toddlers -- head trauma, rib fractures, or abdominal injuries -- are often missed, and that may be due in part to a lack of standardized screening, researchers report. The findings were published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Zip Line Injuries Up Significantly in the United States

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 16,850 nonfatal zip line injuries were treated in U.S. emergency departments between 1997 and 2012, and nearly 70 percent of those injuries occurred during the last four years of that span, according to research published recently in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine.

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Coronary Artery Calcium Score Improves CHD Risk Prediction

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Inclusion of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score improves coronary heart disease (CHD) risk prediction, while the absence of CAC reclassifies many patients as not eligible for statins, according to two studies published in the Oct. 13 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Guidelines Developed for Managing Conflicts of Interest

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Guidelines International Network has developed principles for disclosure and management of conflicts of interest (COIs) during the clinical practice guideline development process, according to a report published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Flu Vaccine Benefits Extend to Fewer Pneumonia Admissions

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccination can substantially reduce the risk of hospitalizations for influenza pneumonia, according to research published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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New Protein Biomarker Identified in Insulin Resistance

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Proteomic blood profiling has identified new circulating biomarkers for homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), according to a study published online Sept. 29 in Diabetes.

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Type of Provider Impacts Health Care Utilization in LBP

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For new entries into health care with low back pain (LBP), the provider chosen for entry is associated with future health care utilization, according to research published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Menstrual Preconditioning May Prevent PCOS-Tied Complications

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Menstrual preconditioning could prevent major obstetrical syndromes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), according to a clinical opinion piece published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Modern Health Care Environment Challenges Humanistic Practice

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Humanism, defined as empathy, altruism, and compassion, should be learned and taught in medical practice, according to an article published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Simvastatin, Vitamin D3 Combo Helps Prevent Migraines

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In adults with episodic migraine, the combination of simvastatin and vitamin D3 seems effective for prevention of headache, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Modified SOAP Ups Student Awareness of Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Modification of the traditional Subjective-Objective-Assessment-Plan (SOAP) presentation to consider value (SOAP-V) can help medical students learn to practice high-value, cost-conscious care, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Research Supports Theory of Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with suspected nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), overall symptom severity increases with intake of small amounts of gluten, according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Providers Must Understand Legal Limits of Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In order to minimize risk when practicing telemedicine, providers should ensure they hold the proper medical licenses, have medical liability insurance coverage, and communicate with patients regarding the potential risks of telemedicine, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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No Benefit Seen With Physical Tx in Acute Lateral Epicondylitis

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients with acute lateral epicondylitis recover without physical therapy and steroid injections, according to a study published recently in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders.

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Psychological Tx for Depression Not As Effective As Believed

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The benefits of psychological therapy for depression are overstated, according to research published online Sept. 30 in PLOS ONE.

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CPAP Eases Symptoms of Depression in OSA Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at increased risk for depression, but continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy may ease their depression symptoms, a new study suggests. The findings appear in the September issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

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Review Suggests Habit Reversal Beneficial in Atopic Dermatitis

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Habit reversal (HR) seems to be beneficial for reducing scratching among patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), according to a review published online Sept. 19 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Add-On Sitagliptin Cuts Risk of Insulin Initiation in T2DM

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with metformin, add-on sitagliptin is associated with a lower risk of insulin initiation than add-on sulphonylurea, according to a study published in the October issue of Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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More Evidence Psoriasis and Depression Are Linked

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Regardless of severity, patients with psoriasis face an elevated risk for depression, new research suggests. The findings were published online Sept. 30 in JAMA Dermatology.

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CT Scans for Lung Cancer Result in Few False-Positives

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical intervention for a non-lung cancer diagnosis is rare following low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Strategies Provided for Improving EHR Efficiency

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Several strategies can be implemented in order to better use electronic health records (EHRs) for patient care and efficiency, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Too Few Women Getting Counseling Before BRCA Test

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only about one-third of women receive genetic counseling before they undergo testing for BRCA mutations, and patients who receive genetic counseling beforehand display better knowledge of the process and possible results, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in JAMA Oncology.

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'Low-Nicotine' Cigarettes May Help Smokers Quit, Smoke Less

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers are more likely to cut back or quit if they switch to cigarettes made from tobacco containing very low levels of nicotine, new research shows. The findings were published in the Oct. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Dysbiosis in Infancy Tied to Asthma Risk in Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of four types of gut bacteria in infancy may reduce a child's risk for asthma, Canadian researchers report. The new report was published online Sept. 30 in Science Translational Medicine.

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Colds, Flu Up Odds for Stroke in Children, Though Risk Is Low

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Having a cold or the flu may sometimes trigger a stroke in children -- particularly those with underlying health conditions -- though the overall risk remains low, according to a new study, published online Sept. 30 in Neurology.

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Integrative Model Is Advised for Cancer Control in Primary Care

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An integrative model incorporating cancer care into primary care is recommended for addressing the increasing burden of cancer control, according to a commission piece published online Sept. 29 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Inverse Link Confirmed for Exercise, Erectile Dysfunction

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity is inversely associated with erectile dysfunction (ED), according to a confirmatory study published in the September issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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