October 2015 Briefing - Cardiology

Share this content:

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for October 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Synchronized Prescription Renewal Process Saves Time

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A synchronized prescription renewal process can save physicians time and money, which can be dedicated to patient care, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Increasing Numbers of Med School Applicants, Enrollees

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a 25 percent increase in the number of medical school enrollees since 2002, with the number reaching an all-time high of 20,630 this year, according to a report published online Oct. 22 by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

More Information

Flu Vaccine Slightly Less Effective in Patients on Statins

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two new studies raise the possibility that statins may blunt the effectiveness of flu vaccines in seniors. The research is published online Oct. 28 in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Abstract 1
Full Text
Abstract 2
Full Text
Editorial

Despite Progress, Mortality Still Risk Up in Patients With T2DM

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Type 2 diabetes still substantially increases mortality risk, with the degree of risk varying with age, renal complications, and glycemic control, according to research published in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Part D Enrollment Doesn't Improve Outcomes After AMI

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), enrollment in Part D by hospital discharge is not associated with improved outcomes, according to a study published online Oct. 27 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: E-Cigarette Use Highest Among 18- to 24-Year-Olds

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 13 percent of American adults have tried electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) at least once, and 3.7 percent currently use them, according to the 2014 National Health Interview Survey by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

Marital Status Appears to Affect Recovery From Cardiac Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Married people who have cardiac surgery may fare better after the operation than those who are divorced, separated, or widowed, according to new research published online Oct. 28 in JAMA Surgery.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Women More Often Treated With Low-Dose Dabigatran

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women are more often treated with low-dose dabigatran, although there is a trend toward lower stroke rates with high-dose dabigatran, according to a study published online Oct. 27 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nearly 15 Percent of Plans Lack In-Network Specialists

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of federal marketplace plans lack at least one in-network specialist, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician Emphasizes Importance of Saying Thank You

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The importance of thanking patients for coming to see you, the physician, is described in an essay published online in Medical Economics.

Full Text

Gender Gap Appears to Continue in Cardiovascular Care

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that doctors don't warn younger women when they're at risk for cardiovascular disease as often as they warn men. And once younger women suffer an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), they are less likely to receive revascularization and more likely to die in the hospital. The findings were reported in two separate studies published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text 1 (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text 2 (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

USPSTF Urges Broader Screening for Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians should screen overweight and obese adults between 40 and 70 years old for abnormal blood glucose levels, and should offer or refer patients with abnormal blood glucose to intensive behavioral counseling interventions, according to new recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. The new recommendations were published online Oct. 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text

ADHD Meds Up Cardiac Event Risk in Long-QT Syndrome

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with long-QT syndrome (LQTS) treated with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications have an increased risk for cardiac events, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

AMA: Eight Reasons for Nonadherence to Medications

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eight reasons associated with patient's intentional nonadherence to medications have been identified in a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

EHR Use Ups Some Outcomes After Myocardial Infarction

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), electronic health record (EHR) implementation is associated with some improvement in outcomes, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

PCI Can Be Considered for Noninfarct Artery in STEMI

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For select patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) with multivessel disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), PCI in the noninfarct artery should be considered, according to new guidelines published online Oct. 21 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

'Dispositional' Mindfulness May Help Ward Off Obesity

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Self-awareness may help reduce the risk of obesity, according to research published online Oct. 19 in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Botulinum Toxin Might Control A-Fib After CABG Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Botulinum toxin injection may help prevent development of atrial fibrillation after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, new research suggests. The results were published online Oct. 20 in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Knee, Hip Arthroplasty Tied to Increased Short-Term MI Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) for osteoarthritis, the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) is increased in the first postoperative month, according to a study published in the October issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Doctors Don't Explain Stroke, Bleeding Risk in A-Fib

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For many Canadian patients with atrial fibrillation, primary care physicians do not provide stroke or bleeding risk estimates, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Midlife Cardiovascular Fitness Tied to Lower Health Costs Later

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher cardiorespiratory fitness in middle age is strongly associated with lower health care costs later in life, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Older Blood Appears Safe for Cardiac Surgery Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac surgery patients given blood stored for more than six weeks face no greater harm than those who get blood donated within two weeks, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Preeclampsia Tied to Congenital Heart Defects

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Preeclampsia may increase risk of congenital heart defects, according to research published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Age Affects Left Ventricle Differently in Men, Women

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Age-related changes to the mass and volume of the left ventricle (LV) occur differently in men and women, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text

Outpatient Spending Higher With Physician-Hospital Integration

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Markets with greater increases in physician-hospital integration show greater increases in spending for outpatient care, but not inpatient care, for a large commercially insured population, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Elderly CHD Patients Not Taking Statins

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High numbers of elderly patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) are not being treated with a statin, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Longer QRS Duration Predicts Cardiac Death, Heart Attack

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Longer QRS duration predicts cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with coronary artery disease, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Approves Praxbind to Reverse Pradaxa's Effect

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Praxbind (idarucizumab) has been approved for use in patients who are taking the anticoagulant Pradaxa (dabigatran) when there is an urgent need to reverse Pradaxa's anticoagulant effects, according to a news release from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

Only Some Energy Drinks Change Endothelial Function

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some energy drinks appear to significantly improve endothelial function, while other energy drinks and coffee do not, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Insulin Dose Doesn't Up Mortality in ACCORD Trial

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial, insulin dose is not associated with cardiovascular (CV) death after adjustment for baseline covariates, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Review Links Lipid Profiles With Tendon Health

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lipid profiles seem to be associated with tendon health, according to a review published online Oct. 15 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Age Impacts Outcomes After Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Age significantly impacts long-term outcomes after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a study published online Oct. 7 in the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Stroke Risk Higher for People With High-Strain Jobs

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to high-strain jobs is associated with an increased risk of stroke, especially in women, according to a meta-analysis published online Oct. 14 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Paclitaxel-Eluting Not Noninferior to Everolimus-Eluting Stent

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Paclitaxel-eluting stents are not noninferior to everolimus-eluting stents for patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics meeting, held from Oct. 11 to 15 in San Francisco.

Abstract
Full Text
More Information

Drug-Coated Beats Bare-Metal Stent for Safety, Efficacy

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A drug-coated stent is superior to a bare-metal stent for patients at high risk for bleeding who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics meeting, held from Oct. 11 to 15 in San Francisco.

Abstract
Full Text
More Information

Metronome Can Improve Rate of Compressions in Pediatric CPR

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of chest compressions during CPR can be optimized by the use of a metronome, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Similar CV Care Quality Seen for NPs, PAs, Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Advanced practice providers (APPs), including nurse practitioners and physician assistants, deliver a quality of outpatient cardiovascular care that is similar to that provided by physicians, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Young Women Less Likely Than Men to Start Meds After AMI

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- After acute myocardial infarction (AMI), younger women are less likely than younger men to initiate prescribed medications, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

α-Tocopherol Bioavailability Lower in Metabolic Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For adults, α-tocopheraol bioavailability is unaffected by dairy fat quantity but is lower in those with metabolic syndrome (MetS), according to a study published online Oct. 7 in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold Deemed Noninferior

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with noncomplex obstructive coronary artery disease, treatment with an everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold is noninferior to treatment with an everolimus-eluting cobalt-chromium stent, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics meeting, held from Oct. 11 to 15 in San Francisco.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
More Information

Some Changes Seen in Line With 'Choosing Wisely' Initiative

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Significant decreases in low-value services were seen in accordance with two of seven early "Choosing Wisely" recommendations, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Viewpoint (subscription or payment may be required)

Doxycycline May Cut Bleeding With Ventricular Assist Device

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doxycycline can potentially cut left ventricular assist device (LVAD)-associated bleeding, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in JACC: Heart Failure.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Red Wine at Dinner May Reduce Cardiometabolic Risk in T2DM

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate red wine intake is safe and modestly decreases cardiometabolic risk among patients with well-controlled diabetes following the Mediterranean diet, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

USPSTF Recommends High Blood Pressure Screening

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends blood pressure screening for adults and use of confirmatory blood pressure measurement outside the clinic setting. These findings form the basis of a review and recommendation statement published online Oct. 12 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Evidence Review
Recommendation Statement

COPD Tied to Increased Risk of Ischemic, Hemorrhagic Stroke

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased risk of all stroke, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke, although the risks are attenuated after adjustment for smoking, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Americans Spend More on Health Care, but Fare Worse

MONDAY, Oct. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When compared to 12 other industrialized nations, Americans spend more on health care services, but they fare worst in terms of life expectancy, according to recent findings from The Commonwealth Fund.

More Information

More Severe Psoriasis Equals More Vascular Inflammation

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As the amount of psoriasis increases, the amount of vascular inflammation increases, according to research published online Oct. 8 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Short Walk Can Restore Vascular Function After Prolonged Sitting

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even a 10-minute walk can restore vascular function in legs affected by prolonged sitting, according to findings published recently in Experimental Physiology.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Troponin Cut-Off Could Help Reduce Admissions, Costs

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A cardiac troponin concentration of <5 ng/L identifies patients at very low risk of myocardial infarction (MI) either during admission or within the following 30 days, researchers report online Oct. 7 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Short Bursts of Intense Exercise Good for Adolescent Hearts

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health benefits for teens are achievable with just eight to 10 minutes of high-intensity exercise, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Being Overweight Helps Women With Heart Failure, but Not Men

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and mildly obese women with heart failure may live significantly longer than similarly heavy men with the progressive disease, according to a study published Oct. 7 in JACC: Heart Failure.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Low Income, Minority Status Affect Medical Care Wait Times

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks and Hispanics spend approximately 25 percent more time seeking health care than whites, and patients also spend more time in a doctor's waiting room if they're unemployed, in a low-paying job, or never attended college, according to research published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Guidelines Developed for Managing Conflicts of Interest

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Guidelines International Network has developed principles for disclosure and management of conflicts of interest (COIs) during the clinical practice guideline development process, according to a report published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Coronary Artery Calcium Score Improves CHD Risk Prediction

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Inclusion of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score improves coronary heart disease (CHD) risk prediction, while the absence of CAC reclassifies many patients as not eligible for statins, according to two studies published in the Oct. 13 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text - McClelland (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text - Nasir (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Nitrites Aid Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), sodium nitrite infusion favorably reduces exercise-linked hemodynamic derangements of cardiac failure, according to a study published in the Oct. 13 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

β-Blockers May Up Risk of Surgical Complications for Some

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients taking β-blockers may face heightened risks of cardiovascular complications during non-cardiac surgeries, according to a large study published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Modified SOAP Ups Student Awareness of Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Modification of the traditional Subjective-Objective-Assessment-Plan (SOAP) presentation to consider value (SOAP-V) can help medical students learn to practice high-value, cost-conscious care, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Providers Must Understand Legal Limits of Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In order to minimize risk when practicing telemedicine, providers should ensure they hold the proper medical licenses, have medical liability insurance coverage, and communicate with patients regarding the potential risks of telemedicine, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

More Information

Strategies Provided for Improving EHR Efficiency

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Several strategies can be implemented in order to better use electronic health records (EHRs) for patient care and efficiency, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

More Information

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease


More in Home

Both Statin, Non-Statin Therapies Effective for Lowering LDL

Both Statin, Non-Statin Therapies Effective for Lowering LDL

Dietary changes, other meds, and even surgery can lower cardiovascular risk similarly to statins

Negative Effects Seen With Video Gaming 9 Hours/Week

Negative Effects Seen With Video Gaming 9&#43; Hours/Week

Benefits seen with one hour a week, but behavioral problems appear to rise at nine hours a week

Improved Adult Lung Function Linked to Childhood Farm Life

Improved Adult Lung Function Linked to Childhood Farm ...

First study to report beneficial effects of growing up on a farm on adult FEV1

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »