November 2016 Briefing - HIV & AIDS

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in HIV & AIDS for November 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

CDC: Needle Exchange Program Usage Up Significantly

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Although there was a significant increase in the use of syringe services programs -- more commonly known as needle exchange programs -- across the United States over the past decade, many injection drug users still don't always use sterile needles, according to a Vital Signs report published in the Nov. 29 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Rising Rx, ER Prices Pushing U.S. Health Care Spending Up

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Privately insured Americans spent nearly 5 percent more on health care last year than in 2014; this increase was significantly more than that seen in previous years and reflects higher costs for prescription drugs, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations, according to a report published Nov. 22 by the Health Care Cost Institute.

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Two-Drug Combo Promising for HIV Remission

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Animal research with an experimental two-drug therapy could hold clues for creating long-term HIV remission, according to a report published online Nov. 9 in Nature.

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HR Capabilities Positively Linked to Quality of Patient Care

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Human resource (HR) capabilities are positively associated with quality of patient care, with the relationship mediated by proactive work, according to a study published recently in Human Resource Management.

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HIV Antibody VRC01 Shows Promise in Early Trials

THURSDAY, Nov. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antibodies may keep the HIV virus in check and one day allow patients to stop taking antiretroviral drugs, according to research published online Nov. 9 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Five Strategies Can Reduce Risk of Medical Lawsuits

MONDAY, Nov. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Five strategies can be employed by physicians in order to help reduce the risk of lawsuits, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Ocular Syphilis Cases May Be Increasing in United States

MONDAY, Nov. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Ocular syphilis has been identified in jurisdictions in the United States, with reports of increases in five jurisdictions in 2014 and 2015, according to a review published the Nov. 4 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Recommendations Updated for Meningococcal Vaccine in HIV

MONDAY, Nov. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In the Nov. 4 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, new recommendations are presented for meningococcal conjugate vaccination among HIV-infected individuals.

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Maternal, Neonatal Adverse Events Up With Antenatal ART

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For HIV-infected pregnant women, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is associated with significantly lower rates of early HIV transmission, but with a higher risk of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, according to a study published in the Nov. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Community Pharmacists Play Role in Providing Preventive Care

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Community pharmacists are well suited to provide clinical preventive services, including education, screenings, and making referrals, according to a report published in the Oct. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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