November 2015 Briefing - Cardiology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for November 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Air Pollution Raises CVD Risks in Women With Diabetes

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Long periods of exposure to air pollution -- including dust and car exhaust -- heightens cardiovascular risks for women with diabetes, according to a study published online Nov. 25 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Review: Changes in Vending Machines Can Promote Health

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Pricing and availability strategies can improve nutritional quality of purchases from vending machines, according to a review published in the December issue of Obesity Reviews.

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Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Predicts MACE in STEMI

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients without diabetes with ST-segment myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (FLD) independently predicts impaired myocardial perfusion and adverse in-hospital outcomes, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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AAFP Recommends Doctors Explore Use of Social Media

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The use of social media channels and associated benefits for physicians are highlighted in a recent article published by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP). And guidelines are provided for physicians wishing to become active in social media.

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Music Can Help Doctors Develop Relationships With Patients

TUESDAY, Nov. 24 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For one physician, writing songs has improved her self-awareness and strengthened her relationships with patients, according to an article published by the American Medical Association.

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Six Months of Walnut Consumption Ups Dietary Quality

TUESDAY, Nov. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The inclusion of walnuts in an ad libitum diet for six months is associated with improved diet quality, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care.

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Central Sleep Apnea Predicts Atrial Fibrillation in Older Men

TUESDAY, Nov. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Central sleep apnea and Cheyne Stokes respiration predict incident atrial fibrillation in older men, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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ACP: Physicians Should Prescribe Generic Meds If Possible

TUESDAY, Nov. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should prescribe generic medications whenever possible, keeping in mind that generics have comparable effectiveness to brand name medications and are associated with reduced costs and increased adherence, according to new guidelines published online Nov. 24 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Risk of Second Event High for Young Women After MI, Stroke

MONDAY, Nov. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Young women who survive a myocardial infarction (MI) or ischemic stroke continue to face an increased mortality risk -- or another MI or stroke, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Higher Resting Heart Rate Tied to Higher Risk of Mortality

MONDAY, Nov. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A higher resting heart rate may indicate higher risk of premature mortality, researchers suggest. The report was published online Nov. 23 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Novel Case of CT-Guided Percutaneous Revascularization

MONDAY, Nov. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The first case of computed tomography-guided percutaneous revascularization of coronary occlusion in man using a wearable, hands-free computer with a head-mounted display has been described. The report was published online Nov. 19 in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

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Comorbid Stress, Depressive Symptoms Common in Diabetes

MONDAY, Nov. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with diabetes, comorbid stress and/or depressive symptoms are common and increase risks for adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, according to a study published online Nov. 17 in Diabetes Care.

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Bilingualism Linked to Better Cognitive Outcome After Stroke

FRIDAY, Nov. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Bilingualism is associated with better cognitive outcome after ischemic stroke, according to a study published online Nov. 19 in Stroke.

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Bursts of High-Intensity Interval Training Beneficial for Older Men

FRIDAY, Nov. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A low-volume, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) program is effective for improving muscle power in older sedentary men, according to a letter to the editor published online Nov. 17 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Most IV HTN Meds Ordered for Patients With SBP <180 mm Hg

THURSDAY, Nov. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Intravenous (IV) antihypertensives are often ordered and administered for patients with asymptomatic uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) levels that are not associated with immediate cardiovascular risk, according to a study published online Nov. 12 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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E-Portfolio Developed to Assess Millennial Med Students

THURSDAY, Nov. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic portfolios are being used to transform medical students' assessments and track progress as students advance through medical training, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Social Jetlag Tied to Prediabetes, Cardiovascular Disease Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Social jetlag due to a habitual discrepancy between endogenous circadian rhythm and actual sleep times, imposed by social obligations, is associated with metabolic risk factors that are linked to cardiovascular disease and prediabetes, according to a study published online Nov. 18 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Maintenance of LDL, HbA1c Goals With Pharmacist-Led Program

THURSDAY, Nov. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Veterans with type 2 diabetes had durable maintenance of their low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and hemoglobin A1c (A1C) goals, but not systolic blood pressure (SBP) goals, after discharge from a pharmacist-managed ambulatory care clinic, in a study published in the November issue of Diabetes Spectrum.

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Meta-Analysis: Rosuvastatin May Be Superior for Plaque Regression

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Rosuvastatin appears to be more effective than atorvastatin for regression of coronary atherosclerotic plaques, according to a meta-analysis published in the Nov. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Burnout Reduces Readiness to Change Teaching Approaches

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Occupational burnout appears to reduce clinical faculty members' readiness to change teaching approaches, according to a study published online Nov. 13 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Hypertension-Linked ER Visits Common and Increasing

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hypertension-related emergency department visits are relatively common and increased from 2006 to 2012, according to a study published in the Dec. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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AAFP: Expected 0.5 Percent Pay Increase Reduced to Zero

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A small but promised Medicare pay increase has effectively been reduced to zero for all physician specialties, according to the final 2016 Medicare physician fee schedule and a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians.

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Testosterone Levels Not Linked to Autonomic Neuropathy in T1DM

TUESDAY, Nov. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For men with type 1 diabetes, testosterone levels are not associated with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), according to a study published online Nov. 12 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Prognostic Biomarkers ID'd in Pulmonary Hypertension

TUESDAY, Nov. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Biomarkers have been identified for the risk of lung transplantation and death in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Reduced Mortality Risk Seen for Coffee Drinkers

TUESDAY, Nov. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People who drink coffee may live longer than those who don't -- with lower risks of early mortality from cardiovascular disease and neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease, according to research published online Nov. 16 in Circulation.

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Therapeutic Hypothermia May Help Cardiac Arrest Patients

TUESDAY, Nov. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who receive therapeutic hypothermia may be nearly three times more likely to survive cardiac arrest, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in Circulation.

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Primary Aldosteronism Screen Cost-Effective in Resistant HTN

MONDAY, Nov. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with resistant hypertension (RH), computed tomography (CT) scanning followed by adrenal venous sampling (AVS) is a cost-effective screen for primary aldosteronism (PA), according to a study published online Nov. 10 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Transitional Care Interventions Cut Risk of Readmission in CHF

MONDAY, Nov. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with congestive heart failure, transitional care interventions (TCIs), especially high-intensity TCIs, are effective for reducing the risks of readmission and emergency department visits, according to a review published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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White-Coat, Masked HTN Tied to Target Organ Complications

MONDAY, Nov. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Both white-coat hypertension (WCH) and masked hypertension (MH) are associated with target organ complications and cardiovascular event risk, according to a study published in the Nov. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Radial Artery Access Reduces Mortality, Major Bleeds in ACS

FRIDAY, Nov. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute coronary syndrome managed with invasive procedures, radial artery access reduces mortality, major coronary adverse events, and major bleeding compared to femoral artery access, according to a meta-analysis published online Nov. 10 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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CDC: Adult Smoking Rate Falls to New Low in the United States

FRIDAY, Nov. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Under 17 percent of adults said they smoked in 2014, down from nearly 21 percent in 2005. And the average number of cigarettes smoked daily fell from nearly 17 to fewer than 14 by 2014. The latest numbers are published in the Nov. 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Urinary Potassium Excretion Tied to Renal, Cardio Risk in T2DM

FRIDAY, Nov. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, higher urinary potassium excretion is associated with decreased risk of renal and cardiovascular events, according to a study published online Nov. 12 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Hormonal Status Impacts Genetic Variation, CIMT Link

FRIDAY, Nov. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hormonal status seems to interact with genetic variants to influence cardiovascular phenotypes, especially those within the innate immunity pathway related to carotid artery intima-medial thickness (CIMT), according to a study published online Oct. 27 in Physiological Genomics.

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CDC: Half of Americans With HTN Don't Have BP Under Control

THURSDAY, Nov. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 47 percent of individuals with hypertension do not have the condition under control, through either lifestyle changes or medications, according to a November data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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CDC: Adult Obesity Still Rising in U.S., Youth Rates Hold Steady

THURSDAY, Nov. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although obesity rates continued to climb among U.S. adults over the past decade, they stabilized for children and teens, according to a November data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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PCI May Not Improve Survival for Some Heart Disease Patients

THURSDAY, Nov. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with stable ischemic heart disease who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) fare no better than those treated with medication and lifestyle changes alone, according to a report published in the Nov. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Exercise Stress ECG Underutilized As Initial Test for Suspected CAD

THURSDAY, Nov. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise stress electrocardiography (ExECG) can yield substantial data from risk stratification in suspected or known coronary artery disease, according to a state-of-the-art paper published in the Nov. 1 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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ACP Issues Guidance on 'Concierge' Practices

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Direct patient contracting practices (DPCPs), in which patients pay out of pocket for some or all services provided by the practice, are growing in popularity, according to a position paper published online Nov. 10 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Central Obesity Is Hazardous, Even at a Normal Weight

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with central obesity but of normal weight according to body mass index (BMI) have a higher risk of premature mortality than overweight or obese people, according to research published online Nov. 10 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Self-Managing Anticoagulation May Benefit Heart Valve Patients

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with mechanical heart valves may benefit from managing their own oral anticoagulant therapy, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Macrolides May Raise Cardiovascular Risks

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Macrolides are associated with a small but measurable increased risk of sudden cardiac death, according to research published in the Nov. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Normal Coronary Angiogram at 65 Predicts Survival

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with normal or near-normal coronary angiogram (CA) results at age 65 years or older have significantly longer survival than the general population, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Expanding Rooming, Discharge Office Protocols Can Save Time

MONDAY, Nov. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Expanding protocols for rooming and discharge can allow physicians to free up an hour or more of time per day, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Study Explores Comfort With Non In-Person Test Results

MONDAY, Nov. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients have different preferences for non in-person receipt of test results, with preferences varying by test, according to a study published in the November-December issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine.

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Exercise Capacity, Heart Rate Response Predict CAD Outcomes

MONDAY, Nov. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise capacity (EC) and heart rate responses to exercise are effective predictors of short-term outcome among patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Web-Based CBT Program Cuts Suicidal Ideation in Interns

MONDAY, Nov. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (wCBT) program is effective for preventing suicidal ideation among medical interns, according to a study published online Nov. 4 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Lipophilic Tops Hydrophilic Statins for Heart Failure

FRIDAY, Nov. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with heart failure, lipophilic statin is superior to hydrophilic statin for cardiac function and inflammation, according to a meta-analysis published in the December issue of Cardiovascular Therapeutics.

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Updated Checklist for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy Studies

FRIDAY, Nov. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An updated list of 30 essential items should be included in every report of a diagnostic accuracy study, according to the Standards for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (STARD) 2015. These new guidelines have been published in several journals, including Radiology, Clinical Chemistry, and The BMJ.

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Poll: Americans Want Health Care Costs Kept in Check

THURSDAY, Nov. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most Americans now support aggressive regulation to keep health care costs in check -- including price caps on drugs, medical devices, and payments to doctors and hospitals, a new HealthDay/Harris Poll has found.

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Doctors Who Order More Tests Have Fewer Malpractice Claims

THURSDAY, Nov. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) --The more tests and treatments U.S. doctors order for patients, the less likely they are to be sued for malpractice, according to a study published online Nov. 4 in The BMJ.

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Sofosbuvir Tied to Rare Cases of Bradyarrhythmia

THURSDAY, Nov. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One of the new, highly effective drugs for treating hepatitis C can cause bradyarrhythmia in some patients, according to a research letter published in the Nov. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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ACP Joins Amicus Curiae Brief to Supreme Court

THURSDAY, Nov. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American College of Physicians (ACP) has joined other organizations in an amicus curiae brief to the Supreme Court, urging the court to uphold considerations of race and ethnicity in the medical school admissions process.

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Adherence, Not Diet Type, Predicts Long-Term Weight Loss

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Low-fat diets are no more effective than other types of diets for long-term weight loss, according to a review published online Oct. 29 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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Doctors Should Consider Financial Factors Before Career Change

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Financial and other factors should be considered before physicians change career direction, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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AMA: 6 Steps to Help Ensure Patients Get Preventive Care

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Panel management, or population health management, can help physicians provide necessary preventive and chronic care to all patients regardless of their visit frequency, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Guidelines Issued for Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The first guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in children have been published online Nov. 3 in Circulation.

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Endovascular Tx Beats tPA Alone for Stroke Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Endovascular therapy with mechanical thrombectomy in ischemic stroke is superior to standard treatment with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for preserving brain function, according to research published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Prescription Medication Use on the Rise in the United States

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More Americans than ever are taking prescription drugs, as well as using more of them, according to research published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Sweetened Drinks Linked to Higher Risk of Heart Failure

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Regular consumption of soda or sweetened fruit drinks may increase risk for heart failure in men, according to research published online Nov. 2 in Heart.

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New Electronic Health Record Regulations Released

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New electronic health record (EHR) regulations modify Stage 2 of the meaningful use program and finalize requirements for Stage 3, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Benefits, Harms of HTN Drugs Should be Considered for Elderly

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For elderly patients with hypertension, the benefits and risks associated with use of antihypertensive medications should be carefully considered, according to a review published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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New Advisory OKs Some Athletes With Heart Conditions to Play

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some athletes with irregular heartbeat caused by long QT syndrome and athletes with long QT syndrome who have implanted pacemakers or defibrillators may be able to play competitive sports, according to new guidelines published online Nov. 2 in Circulation and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Negligible Impact of Anesthetists on Post-Cardiac Surgery Mortality

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Anesthetists make a negligible contribution to post-cardiac surgery mortality, according to a study published online Oct. 28 in Anaesthesia.

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Severe Obesity in Adults Costs Medicaid $8 Billion Annually

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Severe obesity is putting a huge financial strain on both the U.S. Medicaid system and severely obese patients themselves, according to a report published in the November issue of Health Affairs.

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Prescribing Drugs 'Off-Label' Can Pose Serious Safety Risks

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Off-label drug use puts patients at risk for serious side effects, especially when scientific evidence is lacking, according to a study published online Nov. 2 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Competition for Fellowships Broke Records in 2015

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- According to the American Medical Association (AMA), 2015 was a record-breaking year for fellowship applications.

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Displaying Prices to Providers Seems to Reduce Order Costs

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Displaying order prices to physicians seems to reduce order costs, according to a review published online Oct. 23 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Prediabetes Linked to Incident Cardiovascular Disease

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Prediabetes is associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD), although correlations vary with ethnicity and prediabetes definition, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in Diabetes Care.

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Fish Oil Supplementation Doesn't Cut Inflammatory Markers

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For healthy adults, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation does not reduce common markers of systemic inflammation, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Ranolazine Bests Old School Antianginal Medications

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Newer antianginal (AA) medications such as ranolazine show substantial outcome improvements in chronic stable angina pectoris (CSA) compared to traditional medications, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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