November 2014 Briefing - Family Practice

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for November 2014. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Jogging May Help Seniors Walk More Efficiently

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Jogging helps seniors ward off age-related physical decline in walking efficiency, according to a study published online Nov. 20 in PLOS ONE.

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Health Care Organizations See Value of Telemedicine

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Health care organizations are developing and implementing telemedicine programs, although many have yet to receive reimbursement, according to a report published by Foley & Lardner.

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Brain Abnormality Spotted in Many SIDS Babies

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A brain abnormality may be responsible for more than 40 percent of deaths from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), according to a study published online Nov. 24 in Acta Neuropathologica.

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More Patients Meet 2014 Blood Pressure Goals Than JNC-7 Goals

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of patients who did not meet the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee (JNC-7) blood pressure management goals do meet the new goals based on the 2014 expert panel recommendation, according to a study published in the Dec. 2 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Proton Pump Inhibitors Linked to Disruption of Gut Microbiome

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Proton pump inhibitors may disrupt the microbiome of the digestive system, leading to infections and other complications, according to a small new study published online Nov. 25 in Microbiome.

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CDC: Most Americans With HIV Don't Have Virus Under Control

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report estimates that 70 percent of the 1.2 million Americans living with HIV in 2011 did not have their virus under control, even though combination drug therapies can effectively suppress the virus before it can develop into full-blown AIDS.

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NPs, PAs Use More Diagnostic Imaging Compared to Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Advanced practice clinicians (APCs) use more imaging than primary care physicians (PCPs), according to a study published online Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Obesity Tied to Half a Million Cancers Worldwide

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is associated with close to 500,000 new cancer cases worldwide each year, and nearly two-thirds of obesity-related cancers occur in North America and Europe, according to a study published online Nov. 26 in The Lancet Oncology.

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PCV13 Recommended for 6- to 18-Year-Olds at High Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 (PCV13) should be administered to certain children aged 6 through 18 years who are at high risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), according to a policy statement published online Nov. 24 in Pediatrics.

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FDA: Calorie Counts Mandated at Chain Restaurants

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New rules announced Tuesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will have many restaurant chains posting calorie counts on their menus, and the rules even apply to movie theater popcorn and ice cream parlor fare.

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Emergency Department Visits on the Rise

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The number of emergency department visits in the United States rose from 129.8 million in 2010 to a record 136.3 million in 2011, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a serving a day of yogurt may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to new research published online Nov. 25 in BMC Medicine.

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Daily Physical Activity May Help Lower Parkinson's Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A moderate amount of physical activity in daily life may reduce risk of Parkinson's disease, according to a new study published online Nov. 19 in Brain: A Journal of Neurology.

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Home Visits Can Improve Asthma Control for Low-Income Adults

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For low-income adults with uncontrolled asthma, home visitation by community health workers is associated with improvements in asthma control and quality of life, according to a study published online Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Most Seniors Eligible for Statin Rx Under New Guidelines

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Most older Americans qualify for treatment with statins under new guidelines for the treatment of blood cholesterol released late last year by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association. The findings appear in a research letter published online Nov. 17 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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More Advanced Emergency Care May Be Worse in Cardiac Arrest

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Advanced life support given by paramedics to cardiac arrest victims may cost lives rather than save them, while the best treatment might just be good cardiopulmonary resuscitation given by paramedics or emergency medical technicians and getting the patient to the hospital as fast as possible. These findings were published online Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Many Not Treated According to 2013 Cholesterol Guidelines

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients are not being treated in accordance with the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cholesterol guidelines, according to a study published in the Dec. 2 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Worse Outcomes With Deferral of ART Initiation in HIV-1

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with HIV-1 infection, deferral of antiretroviral therapy (ART) beyond 12 months is associated with worse outcomes, according to research published online Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Perineal Self-Acupressure Beneficial in Constipation

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with functional constipation, perineal self-acupressure is associated with improved quality of life and bowel function, according to a study published online Nov. 10 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Hookahs Deliver Toxic Benzene in Every Puff

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many young people consider hookahs a hip and safer way to smoke, but a new study finds fumes from the water pipes contain the toxin benzene, which has been linked to an increased risk of leukemia. These findings were published online Nov. 21 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Higher Resting Heart Rate Tied to Higher Risk of Death in Men

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A higher resting heart rate, independent of fitness, is tied to an increased risk of all-cause mortality in men, according to a study published in the Dec. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Statins Not Tied to Women's Gonado-Sexual Dysfunction

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Statin use is not associated with higher risk of gonado-sexual dysfunction in women, according to a study published online Nov. 10 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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USPSTF: Evidence Lacking for Vitamin D Deficiency Screening

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has concluded that there is currently insufficient evidence to weigh the benefits and harms of vitamin D deficiency screening in asymptomatic adults. These findings form the basis of a final recommendation statement published online Nov. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Restroom Hand Dryers Spread More Germs Than Paper Towels

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Air-blown hand dryers in public restrooms may spread far more germs than conventional paper towels, according to a new study published in the Journal of Hospital Infection and presented at the Healthcare Infection Society International Conference in Lyon, France.

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Special Ambulance Delivers Vital Stroke Care More Quickly

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke outcomes are better when patients are treated in an ambulance by a neurologist equipped with a computed tomography scanner and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), according to a report published online Nov. 17 in JAMA Neurology.

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Pediatricians Should Be Involved in Oral Health Care

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians should perform oral health assessments and help maintain and restore oral health for the youngest children, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Nov. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Digoxin for A-Fib Without Heart Failure Comes With Risks

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Digoxin is associated with increased risk of death and hospitalization among patients with atrial fibrillation but no evidence of heart failure, according to a study published online Nov. 20 in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology.

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Psychosocial Therapy Linked to Lower Suicide Risk

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Psychosocial therapy significantly reduces suicide attempts and deaths among people who have previously attempted suicide, according to a new study published online Nov. 24 in The Lancet Psychiatry.

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Eczema Cases Rising Among U.S. Children

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A growing number of children are being diagnosed with eczema -- but it can usually be eased with topical treatments, according to a new report by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Nov. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Newly Insured Under ACA May Have Trouble Finding Doctors

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans bought health insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act in the past year and physicians may be reluctant to accept these patients.

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In Reperfusion Era, β-Blockers Have No Mortality Benefit in MI

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In the reperfusion era, β-blocker use has no mortality benefit in myocardial infarction, and patients discharged with high heart rate after myocardial infarction have increased mortality risk during the first year, according to research published in the October issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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Meta-Analysis Confirms Sugar-Sweetened Beverage, T2DM Link

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Sugar-sweetened beverage intake is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, according to research published online Nov. 11 in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

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Strategies Needed to Encourage Appropriate Antibiotic Selection

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although primary care providers are generally familiar with guideline recommendations for antibiotic drug selection, they do not always comply with these guidelines, according to research published in the December issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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AMA: Gender Inequality Still Exists in Medicine

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Gender inequality still exists in medicine, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Testosterone Testing Has Increased in Recent Years

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a recent increase in the rate of testosterone testing, with more testing seen in men with comorbidities associated with hypogonadism, according to research published online Nov. 10 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Severe Mental Illness Linked to Increased Mortality After MI

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with severe mental illness (SMI) have increased mortality after myocardial infarction, according to a study published online Nov. 17 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Being the Boss Tied to Depression Risk for Women

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Being the boss at work seems to raise the odds for symptoms of depression among women, but not men, according to new research published in the December issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

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Exercise Might Not Help Glucose Control in Some T2DM

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Certain genes might prevent regular exercise from improving glucose control in up to a fifth of people with type 2 diabetes, according to findings published online Nov. 20 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Structured Education Program Beneficial for Anaphylaxis

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A structured education intervention improves knowledge and emergency management for patients at risk for anaphylaxis and their caregivers, according to a study published online Nov. 19 in Allergy.

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Effect of Interventions to Improve Meds Adherence Vary

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The effects of trials to improve medication adherence are inconsistent, with few studies of the highest quality demonstrating improvement in both adherence and clinical outcome, according to a review published online Nov. 20 in The Cochrane Library.

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Review: Ketogenic Diets Suppress Appetite Despite Weight Loss

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A review of evidence supports that ketogenic diets suppress appetite despite weight loss. The research was published online Nov. 17 in Obesity Reviews.

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State-Level Variation Seen in 10-Year Cardiac Disease Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The predicted 10-year risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) varies by age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, income, and state, according to a study published online Nov. 10 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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FDA Approves Abuse-Resistant Extended-Release Hydrocodone

THURSDAY, Nov. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Hysingla ER (hydrocodone bitartrate), an abuse-resistant, extended-release form of hydrocodone.

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Could Occupation Help Preserve the Aging Brain?

THURSDAY, Nov. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Jobs requiring intellectually challenging tasks may help preserve thinking skills and memory as workers age, according to a study published online Nov. 19 in Neurology.

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Telephone Reminder Intervention Ups Cardiovascular Rx Adherence

THURSDAY, Nov. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A low-cost telephone reminder intervention can improve adherence to cardiovascular disease medications, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in the American Journal of Managed Care.

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U.S. Seniors' Health Poorest, Global Survey Shows

THURSDAY, Nov. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors in America have more chronic health problems and take more medications than seniors in 10 other industrialized countries do, according to a new global survey. The United States also stood out among the 11 nations surveyed by The Commonwealth Fund for having more seniors struggling to get and afford the health care they need.

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Sickle Cell Trait Tied to Increased Pulmonary Embolism Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For African-Americans, sickle cell trait is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary embolism, but not deep vein thrombosis, according to a study published online Nov. 13 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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CDC: Fewer Infants Dying Than Before

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More babies are being born at full term, resulting in fewer infant deaths, according to a November data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). However, the number of fetal deaths -- defined in this report as deaths of fetuses at 20 weeks' gestation or later -- stayed about the same from 2006 through 2012.

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Mortality Up for Long-Term Opioid Users With Chronic Pain

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with chronic noncancer pain, mortality is increased for long-term opioid users, with a smaller increase seen for short-term opioid users and for nonusers versus those without chronic pain, according to a study published in the November issue of PAIN.

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Malpractice Premiums Vary With Work Hours, Practice Size

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There have been significant fluctuations in medical malpractice premiums, based on doctor's age, location, workload, and practice size, according to a report published Nov. 6 in Medical Economics.

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Telephone Support Intervention Beneficial for BRCA Carriers

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A telephone-based, peer-support program can reduce distress and unmet information needs among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, according to a study published online Nov. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Patient-Doc Relationship Affects Alternative Med Use Disclosure

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patient-centered communication with a physician can improve the likelihood of cancer patients disclosing the use of complementary health approaches (CHAs), according to a study published online Nov. 11 in Cancer.

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Number of Pregnant Women on Opioids Doubles

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of women dependent on drugs such as narcotic painkillers or heroin during pregnancy has more than doubled in the past decade and a half, though it still remains below a half-percent of all pregnancies, according to a study published in the December issue of Anesthesiology.

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Low Levels of Vitamin D May Raise Early Death Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Having genetically low levels of vitamin D may raise the risk of early death, but the risk is not linked with early death due to cardiovascular-related causes, according to new research published online Nov. 18 in The BMJ.

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Psychological Intervention Beneficial for Dementia Carers

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A psychological intervention demonstrates clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness for family carers for people with dementia, according to a study published online Nov. 19 in The Lancet Psychiatry.

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Trainee-Led Time-Outs Can Improve Antimicrobial Use

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Trainee-led time-outs to reevaluate antibiotic use can reduce costs in internal medicine units, according to a study published in a supplement to the Nov. 18 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine, highlighting the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program.

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Variation in Proportion of Cancer Survivors Undergoing HIV Testing

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of cancer survivors undergoing HIV testing varies by state and demographic and health-related factors, according to a study published Nov. 13 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Parents Want Children in Day Care to Be Vaccinated

TUESDAY, Nov. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Three-quarters of American parents would consider removing their children from day care if other children did not have all the recommended vaccinations, and many say that under-vaccinated children shouldn't be allowed to attend day care, according to a new University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health.

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Nearly 3 in 10 Americans With Diabetes Don't Know It

TUESDAY, Nov. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Almost eight million Americans have diabetes but don't know it, and that's despite the fact that about two-thirds of those with undiagnosed diabetes have seen a doctor two or more times in the past year, according to a study published in the Nov. 18 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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NSAIDs Tied to Bleeding, Clotting in A-Fib Patients

TUESDAY, Nov. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with atrial fibrillation who take common analgesics can significantly increase their risk for bleeding and thromboembolism, with risk higher among those on anticoagulation who also take a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), according to a new study published in the Nov. 18 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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USPSTF: Evidence Low for Speech Delay Screen in Young Children

TUESDAY, Nov. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that there is currently insufficient evidence to weigh the benefits and harms of screening and treating children aged 5 and under for speech and language delays or disorders. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement published online Nov. 17.

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Head Trauma in Abused Kids Can Have Lifelong Impact

MONDAY, Nov. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Half of children who experience a severe abusive head trauma before the age of 5 will die before they turn 21, and among those who survive severe injuries, quality of life will be cut in half, according to new research. The findings were published online Nov. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Preterm-Birth Complications Leading Global Killer of Young

MONDAY, Nov. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than 3,000 children under the age of 5 die worldwide each day from preterm birth complications, making it the leading cause of death among young children, according to the March of Dimes. That means that for the first time in history, complications from preterm births are the leading killer of young children around the globe.

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Measuring HbA1c at Admission Helps Tailor Treatment Regimen

MONDAY, Nov. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Measurement of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) at hospital admission can tailor treatment regimens at discharge, according to a study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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FDA: Two Generic Versions of ADHD Drug Not As Effective

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Two generic versions of the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder drug Concerta may not work as effectively as the brand-name product does, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Thursday.

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Physicians Feeling More Positive About ACA

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians seem to be feeling more positive about the Affordable Care Act (ACA), according to an article published Oct. 21 in Medical Economics.

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Low Medication Persistence for Older STEMI Patients

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For older patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, evidence-based medication (EBM) persistence is similar after discharge from academic and nonacademic hospitals, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Triple Aim Should Be Expanded to Address Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Expanding the Triple Aim approach -- which includes enhancing patient experience, improving population health, and reducing costs -- to the Quadruple Aim by adding the goal of improving health care provider work life is recommended, according to the authors of an article published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Video Tool Educates Patients About Prostate Health

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A video-based educational tool may improve patient comprehension of common terminology used to describe prostate health, according to research published online Nov. 12 in Cancer.

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Telemedicine Screening IDs Diabetic Retinopathy in 1 in 5

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a nonmydriatic camera for retinal imaging combined with the remote evaluation of images identifies diabetic retinopathy (DR) in about 20 percent of patients with diabetes, according to a study published online Nov. 13 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Improper Contact Lens Use Causes Millions of Eye Infections

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans misuse contact lenses -- wearing them too long, not cleaning them properly -- and that causes almost a million cases of keratitis in the United States annually, according to research published in the Nov. 14 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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NICU Infants Exposed to High Levels of DEHP in Medical Care

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may be exposed to levels of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) that are 4,000 to 160,000 times higher than what is considered safe, according to a study published online Nov. 13 in the Journal of Perinatology.

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Peripheral Nerve Blocks OK for Migraines in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For migraines that do not respond to medications, peripheral nerve blocks may be a treatment option in pregnant women, according to research published online Nov. 5 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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ADHD Stimulant Drug Abuse Common Among Young Adults

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- According to a new survey sponsored by the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, abuse of prescription stimulants is becoming "normalized" among college students and other young adults.

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CDC: More Than One-Fifth of High School Students Smoke

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than a fifth of American teens smoke or use tobacco in some way, according to research published in the Nov. 14 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Patient-Controlled Taping Method Effective for Ingrown Toenails

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A novel patient-controlled taping method is effective for the treatment of ingrown toenails, according to research published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Catastrophizing Linked to Pain, Disability in Low Back Pain

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with low back pain, catastrophizing may be associated with pain and disability, and fear-avoidance beliefs (FABs) correlate with poor treatment outcomes, according to two reviews published in the Nov. 1 issue of The Spine Journal.

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U.S. Medical Bills Pricey, Even With Private Insurance

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many Americans may believe that private insurance can keep major medical bills at bay. But a new survey finds that one-fifth of people with private plans still spend at least 5 percent of their income on out-of-pocket health care costs.

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B Vitamins May Not Boost Cognitive Performance

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Taking vitamin B12 or folic acid supplements may not reduce seniors' risk of memory loss, according to a study published online Nov. 12 in Neurology.

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Many U.S. Doctors Wary of Genetic Testing

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many American doctors may not support genetic testing in patients without a major family history of certain illnesses, suggests a new survey of physicians. The report appears in the Nov. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Hospital Workers Wash Hands Less at End of Shift

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Health workers in hospitals wash their hands less often as they near the end of their shift, and this lapse -- likely due to mental fatigue -- could contribute to hundreds of thousands of patient infections a year in the United States, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in the Journal of Applied Psychology.

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Falls Leading Cause of Serious Head Trauma for Children

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For children under the age of 2, falls account for 77 percent of head injuries, and for children aged 2 to 12, falls cause 38 percent of head injuries. Among teens aged 13 to 17, head injuries are most often caused by assaults, sports, and car crashes. These findings were published in the Nov. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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U.S. Prices Soaring for Some Generic Drugs

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Market forces are dramatically driving up the cost of some generic drugs, prompting U.S. investigations into the pricing of what should be cheap alternatives to brand-name medications.

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Detection Up With One-Step Gestational Diabetes Screening

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A two-hour, one-step screening process increases gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) detection, but has no impact on maternal or neonatal outcomes, according to research published in the October issue of Clinical Diabetes.

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Anemia Prevalent Among Older Patients With Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For older patients with diabetes, the prevalence of anemia is 59 percent, with determinants including older age and longer duration of diabetes, according to research published in the October issue of Clinical Diabetes.

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High-Intensity Statin Effect Independent of Lipoprotein, CRP

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- High-intensity statin therapy is associated with coronary atherosclerosis regression, regardless of baseline lipoprotein or C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Research Shows Men Can Get Oral HPV Infection From Women

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Men are at increased risk for oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection if their female sex partners have oral and/or genital HPV infections, according to a study published online Nov. 12 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Cancer Patients in Hospice Face Less Aggressive Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients who choose hospice care are less likely to receive aggressive end-of-life treatment or to die in hospitals and nursing homes, according to research published in the Nov. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Time to Enroll, or Re-Enroll, in an ACA Health Plan

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The Affordable Care Act marketplaces are now gearing up for a new challenge: persuading Americans who slogged through last year's troubled open enrollment to renew their coverage.

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Researchers Put Commercial Diet Plans to the Test

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There are plenty of famous-name diets for weight loss, but none stands out from the pack when it comes to lasting results, according to a review published online Nov. 11 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Tdap Vaccine Seems Safe in Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Getting a tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis (Tdap) vaccine during pregnancy appears safe for the fetus, according to a study published in the Nov. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Pain, Depression Tied to Delirium Risk Post-Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Pain and depression before an operation may increase seniors' risk for delirium after surgery, according to a study published in the November issue of The Lancet Psychiatry.

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Patient Preference for Anticoagulant Tx Outcome Varies

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patients' preferences for outcomes of anticoagulation therapy vary and are affected by previous stroke or myocardial infarction experience, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Axillary Hair, Deodorant Don't Affect Testosterone Absorption

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- After application of testosterone solution, serum testosterone concentration is unaffected by the presence or absence of axillary hair or by the use of deodorant/antiperspirant, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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All Vaginal Estrogens Effective for Genitourinary Sx of Menopause

TUESDAY, Nov. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- All vaginal estrogens are effective for women with genitourinary syndrome of menopause, according to a review published online Nov. 5 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Computerized Dashboard Can ID Potentially Inappropriate Meds

TUESDAY, Nov. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A computerized potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) dashboard can allow identification of older inpatients on high-risk medication regimens, according to research published online Nov. 3 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Proactivity Can Help Practices Meet Peak Demands

TUESDAY, Nov. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Actions can be taken to meet peak demand in practices, according to an article published Nov. 10 in Medical Economics.

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Medicare to Cover Lung Cancer CT Screening for Long-Time Smokers

TUESDAY, Nov. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Annual lung cancer screenings for long-term smokers may soon be covered by Medicare, the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced Monday.

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Cardiac Prognosis Bright for STEMI Survivors Post-PCI

TUESDAY, Nov. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who survive the first month after an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have <1.5 percent annual risk of successive cardiac death; however, they still have an increased risk of death from noncardiac causes. These findings were published in the Nov. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Worse Health-Related Quality of Life for Older Cancer Survivors

TUESDAY, Nov. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is worse for older survivors of selected cancers, specifically survivors of multiple myeloma and pancreatic cancer, according to a study published online Nov. 4 in Cancer.

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PSA Rise With Testosterone Gel Tied to Specific Factors

TUESDAY, Nov. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Factors predicting greater prostate-specific antigen (PSA) increases with use of testosterone gel (T-gel) include age 60 years and older, baseline testosterone (T) ≤250 ng/dL, and percentage of free PSA <20 percent, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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NSAID Use Linked to Increased Risk of Incident A-Fib

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use is associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) incidence, particularly among new users, according to a meta-analysis published in the Nov. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Guideline Developed for Prophylactic Platelet Transfusion

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations have been developed by the AABB (formerly the American Association of Blood Banks) for prophylactic platelet transfusion. The clinical practice guideline was published online Nov. 11 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Some Docs Are Failing to Counsel Young Adults With Hypertension

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Only about one in two young American adults with hypertension receive advice from a doctor on lifestyle changes, according to a study published online Nov. 6 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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CDC: Skin Cancer Costs Soar Compared to Other Cancers

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of skin cancer treatment in the United States more than doubled between 2002 and 2011, and rose five times faster than treatments for other cancers, according to study findings published online Nov. 9 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Fewer U.S. Hospitalizations for Hepatitis A

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a sharp decline in the rate of hospitalizations for hepatitis A in the United States, according to a study published online recently in Hepatology.

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Laundry Detergent Pods Pose Poisoning Risk to Children

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Laundry detergent "pods," an alternative to traditional liquid and powder detergents, pose a serious health risk to children, especially those under age 3, according to a report published online Nov. 10 and in Pediatrics.

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Preventable Hospitalizations ID'd in Pediatric Medical Complexity

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A review published online Nov. 10 in Pediatrics identifies the characteristics of preventable hospitalizations for children with medical complexity (CMC), and offers strategies for the prevention of these hospitalizations.

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Review: Point-of-Care Biomarker May Help Cut Antibiotic Use

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The point-of-care C-reactive protein biomarker test of infection can reduce antibiotic use, although it does not affect clinical recovery, according to a review published online Nov. 6 in The Cochrane Library.

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Education Level, BMI Linked to Postpartum GDM Follow-Up

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Among women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), lower education level and higher body mass index (BMI) at diagnosis are associated with reduced likelihood of postpartum follow-up, according to research published in the October issue of Clinical Diabetes.

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Visceral Fat Key Marker for Cardiometabolic Risk

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Visceral fat is associated with cardiometabolic risk, including metabolic syndrome, regardless of body mass index (BMI), according to a study published online Nov. 5 in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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Aspirin May Exacerbate Chronic Urticaria in Children

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In some children with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), exacerbations may be caused by hypersensitivity to aspirin, according to research published online Oct. 29 in Allergy.

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CDC Spends $2.7 Million on Ebola Hospital Kits

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- About $2.7 million in personal protective gear has been ordered for health care workers at U.S. hospitals treating Ebola patients, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.

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Want to Be a Leader? Cultivate a Healthy Look

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- It's more important for potential business or political leaders to look healthy than intelligent, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.

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Climate Change Will Boost Grass Pollen Production

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change will boost levels of grass pollen in the air in the next 100 years, resulting in more allergen exposure, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in PLOS ONE.

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Premature Births Down in U.S., but Rates Still High

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Preterm births in the United States fell to 11.4 percent in 2013, the lowest rate in 17 years, the March of Dimes reported Thursday. And since 2005, the rate of preterm deliveries has declined consistently each year for the first time in more than two decades, according to an unrelated study published online Nov. 5 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Better Physician Communication at Shift Change Reduces Errors

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Changing how doctors communicate during shift changes in hospitals reduces the risk of adverse events in patients by 30 percent, according to a study published in the Nov. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Docs Spend ~16.6 Percent of Their Time on Administration

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- About 16.6 percent of doctors' working hours are spent on administrative work, according to a study published recently in the International Journal of Health Services.

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FPG + A1C Best Detects Abnormal Glucose Tolerance in Africans

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For U.S.-based Africans, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and hemoglobin A1c (A1C) in combination have higher sensitivity for abnormal glucose tolerance than either test alone, with no difference by variant hemoglobin status, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in Diabetes Care.

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Sexual Function, Mental Health Linked in Rheumatic Disease

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of anxiety and depression in people with rheumatic diseases may be an independent predictor of sexual dysfunction, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Genes May Determine Body Weight by Shaping Gut Bacteria

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Genes influence a person's body weight by determining the types of bacteria that live in the intestines, according to a study published in the Nov. 6 issue of Cell.

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CDC: Newer Pneumonia Vaccine for Children Beats Older Version

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new pneumococcal vaccine is almost 30 percent more effective than its previous version in preventing hospitalizations of young children for pneumonia, according to research published in the Nov. 7 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Predictors of Insomnia ID'd in Long-Term Care Facilities

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Predictors of insomnia in long-term care facilities in Europe and Israel include age, depression, hypnosedatives, and stressful life events, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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ACOG Issues Guidance for Care of Pregnant Women With Ebola

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Guidelines have been developed for the care of pregnant women at risk of or with suspected Ebola virus disease (EVD), according to a practice advisory published online Nov. 3 by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

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Lung Cancer Screening Can Be Cost-Effective

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer screening with computed tomography (CT) can be cost-effective while saving lives, as long as the procedure is performed by skilled professionals and the screening done on a very specific set of long-time smokers. These findings were published in the Nov. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Lower Doses of Rheumatoid Arthritis Meds May Work for Some

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients in the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis may be able to have their medication doses safely lowered once their symptoms are well under control, according to a study published in the Nov. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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More Evidence That Certain NSAIDs Up Post-Stroke Mortality

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Certain cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, including celecoxib (Celebrex) and etodolac (Lodine), are associated with increased mortality within a month after a stroke, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Neurology.

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Colorectal Cancer on the Rise for U.S. Adults Under 50

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- While rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) have fallen among older Americans, cases among adults aged 20 to 49 are rising and expected to continue to do so, according to research published online Nov. 5 in JAMA Surgery.

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ADHD Linked to Expectant Mothers' Pollution Exposure

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women exposed to air pollution are five times more likely to have children who develop behavior problems related to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Nov. 5 in PLOS ONE.

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Too Many Women Not Being Screened for Cervical Cancer

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated eight million American women ages 21 to 65 haven't been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years. That's the finding of a Vital Signs report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that noted that more than half of cervical cancer cases occur among women who've never or rarely been screened.

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Bone Health After Fracture May Be Overlooked in Men

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Older men are much less likely than women to receive osteoporosis screening and treatment after suffering a wrist fracture, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Collaborative Care Cuts Depression With Diabetes

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Using a nurse case-manager-based collaborative primary care team can cut depressive symptoms in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in Diabetes Care.

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BADGE Exposure Can Elicit Contact Allergy Reactions

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to aluminum tubes for pharmaceutical use that are internally lacquered with epoxy resins (ER) based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) can elicit contact allergy reactions, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in Allergy.

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Google Glass Might Adversely Affect Vision

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Since its initial launch in 2013, Google Glass has been touted as a revolutionary entry into the world of "smart" eyewear. The promise: a broadly expanded visual experience with on-the-move, hands-free access to photos, videos, messaging, web-surfing, and apps. The catch: a small new study suggests that the structure of the glasses (rather than the software) may curtail natural peripheral vision, creating blind spots that undermine safety while engaging in routine tasks, such as driving or walking.

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Walking Program Feasible, Safe for Older Adults in Hospital

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A clinical demonstration program of supervised walking for older adults admitted to the hospital is feasible and safe, and its participants are more often discharged directly to home, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Hospitalizations for Pulmonary Embolism Vary by Season

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalizations for pulmonary embolism (PE) are higher in the winter and lower in the summer, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Homeostasis.

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Even Early Signs of Plaque in Arteries Signal Heart Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Even the earlier signs of coronary artery disease significantly increase the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and early death, according to a new study published in the Nov. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Hospital MRSA Traced to U.K. Livestock

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals can be traced back to livestock, and the strain's resistance to antibiotics is likely due to the widespread use of antibiotics on farms, according to a study published in the December issue of Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

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AMA: New Mapping Tool IDs Areas in Need of Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new interactive mapping tool can help physicians and their staff determine locations to establish or expand their practice, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Ambulance Use With MI Tied to Higher Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Using an ambulance for hospital transport of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with higher mortality, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Repeated FITs May Be Equivalent Alternative to Colonoscopy

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Repeated annual fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) can detect all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases and may be equivalent to colonoscopy in detecting advanced neoplasia in first-degree relatives of patients with CRC, according to a study published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Psychosocial Interventions Tied to Telomere Length Maintenance

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For distressed breast cancer survivors, psychosocial interventions such as mindfulness-based cancer recovery (MBCR) and supportive-expressive group therapy (SET) result in a trend toward telomere length (TL) maintenance, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in Cancer.

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Urinary Retention Seen in ~5% of Posterior Lumbar Surgeries

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of developing postoperative urinary retention (POUR) after posterior lumbar spine surgery is approximately 5 percent, with certain patient factors associated with higher risk, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of Spine.

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'Purpose in Life' a Boon to Seniors' Health

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults with a strong sense of purpose in life may be particularly likely to get health screenings such as cholesterol tests and mammograms, and appear to spend less time in the hospital, according to research published online Nov. 3 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Optimal Screening Cut-Off ID'd for GDM in Twin Pregnancies

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The optimal one-hour 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT) screening cut-off for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is ≥135 mg/dL in twin pregnancies, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Nearly 75% of Patients With No CAD Have Persistent Symptoms

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly three-quarters of people whose hearts are found to be healthy after being checked for coronary artery disease continue to have persistent symptoms such as chest pain, according to research published online Nov. 3 in Open Heart.

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Atrial Fibrillation May Double Risk for 'Silent Strokes'

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Atrial fibrillation (AF) may more than double the risk of silent cerebral infarction (SCI), a new review suggests. The report was published in the Nov. 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Many Americans May Get Hospice Care Too Late

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Of the more than 1.5 million patients who received hospice care in the United States in 2013, one-third died within one week, according to a new report from the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization.

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Better Detection Major Factor Behind Rise in Autism Cases

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The dramatic increase in the number of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder is largely the result of changes in how the condition is reported, Danish researchers contend. The report was published online Nov. 3 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Vegetable Intake Reduces Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Increased intake of vegetables, but not fruit, is associated with a reduction in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to research published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Long-Term Shift Work May Drain the Brain

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Working non-standard hours -- "shift work" -- for many years is not only hard on the body, but may also dull the mind, new research suggests. According to the study, published online Nov. 3 in Occupational & Environmental Medicine, those who do shift work for more than 10 years seem to have the equivalent of an extra 6.5 years of age-related decline in memory and thinking skills.

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Sofosbuvir Plus Ledipasvir Seems Effective for HCV Genotype 1

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 (HCV GT-1) infection who are ineligible for interferon therapy, and who relapsed after sofosbuvir and ribavirin treatment, sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir is a promising new therapy, according to a small study published in the Nov. 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Risk of Major Bleeds Up for Dabigatran Versus Warfarin

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Dabigatran (Pradaxa) is associated with higher risks of major bleeding and gastrointestinal bleeding compared with warfarin. However, patients taking dabigatran also have a reduced risk of intracranial bleeding compared with those taking warfarin, according to new research published online Nov. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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End-of-Life Care Discussions May Miss Patient Priorities

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Important points are often missed when doctors have end-of-life discussions with patients and their families, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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ACP Issues Recurrent Kidney Stone Prevention Guidelines

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Increased fluid intake is recommended to prevent recurrent nephrolithiasis, with pharmacological monotherapy suggested for patients in whom increased fluid intake fails to reduce stone formation. These clinical practice guidelines were developed by the American College of Physicians (ACP) and published in the Nov. 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Ebola Elimination Possible With Early Patient Isolation

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Isolation of patients with Ebola in critical condition within days of symptom onset is likely to have a high chance of eliminating the disease, according to a study published online Oct. 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Bariatric Surgery Substantially Reduces T2DM Risk in Obese

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery in obese patients significantly lowers risk of developing type 2 diabetes, independent of other factors such as smoking, hypertension, and high cholesterol, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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Typical ADHD Care Leaves Room for Improvement

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many community-based pediatricians do not follow guideline-recommended care for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a new study published online Nov. 3 in Pediatrics.

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Median Neuropathy at the Wrist May Signal Diabetic Neuropathy

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Median neuropathy at the wrist (MN) may be an early indicator of diabetic neuropathy, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

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Rate of PCI for Coronary Artery Disease Drops in the U.S.

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In the past several years, the rate of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for coronary artery disease (CAD) has decreased in the United States, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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CT Findings ID Tx Effectiveness in Small-Bowel Obstruction

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Computed tomographic (CT) findings can predict the effectiveness of nonsurgical treatment in patients with adhesive small-bowel obstruction (SBO), according to a study published in the November issue of Radiology.

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AMA: Absence of Health Insurer Competition in Many Areas

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In most metropolitan areas, there is a significant absence of health insurer competition, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Preterm, Low Birth-Weight Babies May Need New Hips As Adults

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who were born preterm or at a low birth weight may have an increased risk of needing a hip replacement due to osteoarthritis, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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