No Recent Increase in Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in U.S.

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No Recent Increase in Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in U.S.
No Recent Increase in Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in U.S.

FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Since the early 2000s there has been little increase in the prevalence of stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the United States, according to a study published online Aug. 2 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Daniel Murphy, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues updated trends in CKD prevalence in a repeated cross-sectional study. Data were included for adults aged 20 years and older from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1988 to 1994 and every two years from 1999 to 2012.

The researchers found that from the late 1990s to the early 2000s there was an increase in the unadjusted prevalence of stage 3 and 4 CKD. The overall prevalence has largely stabilized since 2003 to 2004 (6.9 percent prevalence in 2003 to 2004 and in 2011 to 2012). After controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and diabetes mellitus status, there was little difference in adjusted prevalence of stage 3 and 4 CKD overall (P = 0.26). The lack of increase in prevalence of CKD since the early 2000s was consistent across most subgroups and with an expanded definition of CKD that included those with higher estimated glomerular filtration rates and albuminuria.

"In a reversal of prior trends, there has been no appreciable increase in the prevalence of stage 3 and 4 CKD in the U.S. population overall during the most recent decade," the authors write.

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