No Link for Tea, Coffee Intake With Barrett's Esophagus

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
No Link for Tea, Coffee Intake With Barrett's Esophagus
No Link for Tea, Coffee Intake With Barrett's Esophagus

THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- After adjustment for confounding variables there is no correlation between the risk of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and tea or coffee consumption, according to a study published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Krishna C. Sajja, M.D., from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and colleagues examined the correlation between tea/coffee consumption and BE in a cross-sectional study among U.S. veterans. Three hundred ten patients with histologically confirmed BE were compared with 1,728 individuals with no endoscopic or histopathologic features of BE.

The researchers observed a statistically significant association between the risk of BE with consumption of coffee (odds ratio, 1.41; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.06 to 1.87) or tea (odds ratio, 1.34; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.05 to 1.71) in univariate models. However, after adjustment for confounders, including sex and race, there was no correlation between the risk of BE and consumption of coffee (adjusted odds ratio, 1.04; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.76 to 1.42) or tea (adjusted odds ratio, 1.11; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.85 to 1.44).

"These data do not support an association between consumption of coffee or tea and the risk of BE," the authors write. "It is unlikely that avoidance of coffee or tea will protect against BE."

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

SABCS: Artificial Intelligence May Aid Doctors in Breast Cancer Care

SABCS: Artificial Intelligence May Aid Doctors in Breast ...

'Watson Oncology' agreed with doctors 90 percent of the time in many cases, researchers find

SABCS: Scalp-Cooling System Can Reduce Chemo-Related Hair Loss

SABCS: Scalp-Cooling System Can Reduce Chemo-Related Hair Loss

Devices reduce blood flow to hair follicles during chemotherapy treatments

SABCS: Aromatase Inhibitors Tied to Reduced Endothelial Function

SABCS: Aromatase Inhibitors Tied to Reduced Endothelial Function

Women on aromatase inhibitors exhibit less elasticity in their blood vessels

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »