Multivitamin Use Does Not Benefit Cardiovascular Health in Men

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Multivitamin Use Does Not Benefit Cardiovascular Health in Men
Multivitamin Use Does Not Benefit Cardiovascular Health in Men

FRIDAY, April 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A daily multivitamin doesn't benefit cardiovascular health in men, according to a study published online April 5 in JAMA Cardiology.

Howard Sesso, Sc.D., M.P.H., of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and colleagues tracked data from an ongoing study of 13,316 U.S. male physicians over the age of 50.

The team found that taking multivitamins did not reduce the men's risk of cardiovascular disease over 11 years of follow-up. The findings held for men even with poor baseline nutritional status.

"Many had thought that men with 'poor' nutritional status at baseline may benefit more from long-term multivitamin use on cardiovascular outcomes; however, we did not see any evidence for this in our recent analysis," Sesso said in a hospital news release.

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