MS Disease Progression May Be Delayed by Smoking Cessation

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
MS Disease Progression May Be Delayed by Smoking Cessation
MS Disease Progression May Be Delayed by Smoking Cessation

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple sclerosis (MS) progresses faster in people who continue to smoke compared to smokers who quit after their diagnosis, according to research published online Sept. 8 in JAMA Neurology.

The study included 728 MS patients in Sweden who were smokers at the time of their diagnosis. Some patients continued smoking while others quit within a year, the researchers said.

Each additional year of smoking after MS diagnosis accelerated the time to secondary progressive disease by nearly 5 percent, the findings showed. Patients who continued to smoke each year after diagnosis converted to secondary progressive disease earlier (average age 48) than those who quit smoking (average age 56).

The study adds to evidence that smoking is a major modifiable risk factor for MS, Myla Goldman, M.D., of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, and Olaf Stuve, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, write in an accompanying editorial. "Most importantly, it provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that quitting smoking appears to delay onset of secondary progressive MS and provide protective benefit. Therefore, even after MS diagnosis, smoking is a risk factor worth modifying."

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease



Sign up for myCME e-newsletters




More in Home

Florida Teen First Human Case of Another Mosquito-Borne Virus

Florida Teen First Human Case of Another Mosquito-Borne ...

First documented case of Keystone infection in a human

70 Sickened So Far in Salmonella-Tainted Melon Outbreak

70 Sickened So Far in Salmonella-Tainted Melon Outbreak

Illnesses reported in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, and Tennessee

AAFP Still Recommends CRC Screening From Age 50 to 75

AAFP Still Recommends CRC Screening From Age 50 ...

Despite ACS change to start screening from age 45 years, AAFP agrees with USPSTF recommendation

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »