Moving in First Year of Life Ups Preventable Hospitalizations

Share this content:
Moving in First Year of Life Ups Preventable Hospitalizations
Moving in First Year of Life Ups Preventable Hospitalizations

WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children who move homes in the first year of life have a significantly increased risk of emergency admissions for potentially preventable hospitalizations (PPH) between ages 1 and 5 years, according to research published online June 3 in Pediatrics.

Hayley A. Hutchings, Ph.D., from Swansea University Medical School in the United Kingdom, and colleagues conducted a cohort analysis of linked anonymized data on 237,842 children in the Welsh Electronic Cohort for Children. The authors examined the correlation between moving homes in the first year of life and subsequent emergency admissions for PPH between 1 and 5 years of age.

The researchers found that, compared with not moving, moving homes frequently in the first year of life correlated with increased risk of emergency PPH between ages 1 and 5, after adjustment for confounders. For two or more moves, there were significant differences associated with ear, nose, and throat infections (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.44); convulsions and epilepsy (IRR, 1.58); injuries (IRR, 1.33); dehydration/gastroenteritis (IRR, 1.51); asthma (IRR, 1.61); and influenza/pneumonia (IRR, 1.15). For one or more move there was a significant difference for dental conditions (IRR, 1.30).

"Additional research that focuses on enhancing health and social support services for highly mobile families, educating parents about safety risks, and improving housing quality is warranted," the authors write.

Full Text

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

Trending Activities

All Professions

More in Home

FDA Approves Kinase Inhibitor for Treatment of AML

FDA Approves Kinase Inhibitor for Treatment of AML

Midostaurin, in combination with chemotherapy, treats acute myeloid leukemia in adults

Enzyme Replacement Drug OK'd for Form of Batten Disease

Enzyme Replacement Drug OK'd for Form of Batten ...

Brineura will be used to treat children with late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2 Batten

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »