Motor Sport Tied to Carbon Monoxide Poisonings, Deaths

Share this content:
Motor Sport Tied to Carbon Monoxide Poisonings, Deaths
Motor Sport Tied to Carbon Monoxide Poisonings, Deaths

FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The off-road motor sport known as mud bogging can put drivers and passengers at risk of potentially lethal carbon monoxide poisoning, researchers say. Their report was published in the Sept. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Like its name implies, mud bogging involves navigating a vehicle through muddy pits or tracks. The problem is, mud can clog exhaust pipes, sending carbon monoxide into the cabin of the vehicle. Doctors at one U.S. hospital report on incidents that landed four teenagers in the emergency department.

In one, an 18-year-old driver and a 16-year-old passenger lost consciousness after being overcome by carbon monoxide while mud bogging. In the other incident, two backseat passengers -- ages 16 and 19 -- were affected. They were treated with hyperbaric oxygen, and all survived.

"We're reporting this because we want the public to be aware of the risk," report coauthor Michael Lynch, M.D., an emergency medicine physician at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, told HealthDay.

Full Text

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

Trending Activities

All Professions



Sign up for myCME e-newsletters




More in Home

FDA Approves Palynziq for Phenylketonuria

FDA Approves Palynziq for Phenylketonuria

Drug is a novel enzyme therapy for adult patients with PKU with uncontrolled blood Phe concentrations

Increase in Tx Candidates With 2017 Hypertension Guidelines

Increase in Tx Candidates With 2017 Hypertension Guidelines

Increase in proportion of adults recommended for treatment; estimated decrease in CVD events, deaths