Most Melanomas Don't Start As Existing Moles

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Most Melanomas Don't Start As Existing Moles
Most Melanomas Don't Start As Existing Moles

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of melanomas arise from new lesions rather than existing moles, according to a review published online Aug. 29 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Researchers conducted a review of 38 previously published medical studies involving 20,126 melanomas.

The findings showed that only 29.1 percent of the skin cancers started in moles patients already had, while 70.9 percent arose as new lesions on the skin.

"In conclusion, in this systematic review and meta-analysis we found that less than one-third of melanomas were nevus-associated and that nevus-associated melanomas were less thick than de novo melanomas," the authors write. "Among nevus-associated melanomas, we found no significant differences in the distribution of dysplastic and nondysplastic remnants."

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