Metformin in Pregnancy Shows No Effect on Infant Birth Weight

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Metformin in Pregnancy Shows No Effect on Infant Birth Weight
Metformin in Pregnancy Shows No Effect on Infant Birth Weight

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of metformin during pregnancy doesn't impact the birth weight of infants born to obese mothers, according to a study published online July 9 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

In the study, 226 women received metformin from the second trimester until their babies were born, while 223 women took a placebo. The researchers observed no difference in the weight of infants born to mothers in the two groups.

Taking metformin did lower women's blood glucose and levels of other markers associated with preeclampsia and premature birth. However, the medication didn't reduce the risk of miscarriage or stillbirth.

"The children of obese pregnant women face a lifetime of long-term health complications as they grow up. The results of [this] study emphasize the importance for women to be of normal weight before pregnancy," Jane Norman, M.D., director of Tommy's Centre for Maternal and Fetal Health at the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom, said in a university news release.

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