May 2017 Briefing - Ophthalmology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Ophthalmology for May 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Social Psychology May Help With Physician Error Disclosure

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Lessons from social psychology can be used to improve behavioral changes in terms of error disclosure, according to research published online May 18 in Medical Education.

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High-Risk Pools May Represent Step Back for U.S. Health Care

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Proposed legislation as part of the American Health Care Act, which includes the option of high-risk pools, is not likely to reduce costs, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online May 23 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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New Bill Intends to Repeal Limits on Physician-Owned Hospitals

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives would repeal the federal law essentially banning construction of physician-owned hospitals and making it difficult for these facilities to grow, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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New Health Care Act Could Result in 23 Million Losing Insurance

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The Republican-led bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that passed the House this month would result in 23 million Americans losing their health insurance coverage, according to a report issued by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO).

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Cognitive Decline Linked to Visual Field Variability

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients diagnosed as having glaucoma or glaucoma suspects, cognitive decline is associated with increased visual field variability, according to a study published online May 18 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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New Interactive Module Aims to Clarify Professional Boundaries

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new interactive training module in medical ethics can help physicians to understand professional boundaries, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Mapping IDs Geographic Access Barriers for Diabetic Retinopathy

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Geographic information systems mapping can visualize geographic access barriers to eye care among patients with diabetes, while telescreening can increase the rate of diabetes retinopathy evaluation, according to two studies published online May 18 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Path to Empathy Deemed As Vital As Being Empathetic

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Different paths to perspective of another's experience are associated with varying effect on helpers' health during helping behavior, according to a study published online April 16 in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

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Functional Interaction Seen for Dietary Carbohydrates With AMD

TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There may be a functional interaction between dietary carbohydrates, the metabolome, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) features (AMDf), according to an experimental study published online May 15 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Nine of Ten Practices Surveyed Have Dismissed Patients

MONDAY, May 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of medical practices have dismissed patients, according to a research letter published online May 15 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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High Vitamin K1 Intake Linked to Reduced Cataract Risk

FRIDAY, May 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High intake of vitamin K1 is associated with reduced risk of cataracts, according to a study published online May 11 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Tips Provided to Help Physicians Plan for Retirement

THURSDAY, May 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should consider their retirement and plan ahead at all stages of their career, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Findings Support Lower Doses of Atropine in Pediatric Myopia Rx

THURSDAY, May 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Adverse effects are less frequent at lower doses of atropine, and higher doses are not more effective in reducing progression of myopia in children, according to a meta-analysis published online May 11 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Treatment in Hospital by Older Doctors Tied to Higher Mortality

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized patients 65 and older may face a slightly higher risk of dying within a month of their admittance when treated by an older versus younger physician, according to research published online May 16 in The BMJ.

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CDC: Slowing of Decline in Number of Uninsured Adults

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The decline in the number of Americans without health insurance stalled in 2016 after five years of progress, according to a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report released Tuesday.

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GAT Values More Discordant Than DCT Measures in Glaucoma

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Conventional Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) values for intraocular pressure (IOP) are significantly discordant compared with Pascal dynamic contour tonometry (DCT) measurements in patients with thin corneas and advanced glaucoma, according to a study published online May 11 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Plan Suggested for Reducing Health Care Costs

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Health care costs can be reduced, with a nine-step plan suggested as a starting place, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Pharmacist-Involved Collaborative Care Benefits T2DM

MONDAY, May 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Multidisciplinary collaborative care with pharmacist follow-up is beneficial for Asian patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online April 27 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Hospitals Need to Be Prepared for Ransomware Attacks

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hackers are increasingly targeting hospitals, using viruses to lock their computer systems and hold sensitive medical data and other files hostage, according to an observation piece published online May 11 in The BMJ.

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Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Program Ups Outcomes

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program is associated with improved outcomes for patients undergoing elective colorectal resection and emergency hip fracture repair, according to a study published online May 10 in JAMA Surgery.

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Practice Prices Linked to Some Measures of Care Coordination

THURSDAY, May 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High-price practices have higher scores on certain measures of care coordination and management, but the overall relationship between higher prices and quality and efficiency of care is weak, according to a report published in the May issue of Health Affairs.

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Outpatient Wait Times Are Longer for Medicaid Recipients

THURSDAY, May 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Medicaid patients have slightly longer waits at medical appointments than those with private insurance, according to a report published in the May issue of Health Affairs.

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Increases in Rates of Insured Don't Harm Continuously Insured

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Increases in insurance coverage from 2008 to 2014 were not associated with worse access to care for continuously insured adults, according to a study published in the May issue of Health Affairs.

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Risk of Zika Infection Appears to Be Low for Pregnant Women

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. women traveling to areas where the Zika virus is circulating might be less likely to be infected than expected, but risk remains, according to research published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Postmarket Safety Events for 32 Percent of Novel Therapeutics

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- From 2001 to 2010, 32 percent of novel therapeutics approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had a postmarket safety event, according to a study published in the May 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Evidence-Based Medicine Course Beneficial for Critical Thinking

TUESDAY, May 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An evidence-based medicine (EBM) course has some positive effect on medical student critical thinking (CT), according to a study published online April 27 in the Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine.

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Most Physician Mothers Report Perceived Discrimination

TUESDAY, May 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of physician mothers report perceived discrimination, according to a research letter published online May 8 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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More Women Than Men Leaving Practice of Medicine

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More women than men leave the practice of medicine, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Prevalence of Visual Impairment in Preschoolers Expected to Rise

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Close to 175,000 American preschoolers struggle with common, but untreated, visual impairment, and that figure is expected to rise significantly in the coming years, according to a study published online May 4 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Systemic Therapy Improves Visual Acuity in Uveitis

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Systemic therapy is associated with improved visual acuity compared with intravitreous fluocinolone acetonide implants for patients with uveitis, according to a study published online May 6 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Poll: Many Americans Concerned About ACA Repeal

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Only one in five Americans support a repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a new HealthDay/Harris Poll reveals.

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CMS Releases Resources to Help With Payment System

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently added three new online resources to assist physicians already participating in the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and those exploring the opportunities available.

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Teprotumumab More Effective Than Placebo for Ophthalmopathy

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A human monoclonal antibody inhibitor of insulin-like growth factor I receptor, teprotumumab, is more effective than placebo for patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, according to a study published in the May 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Half of U.S. Doctors Receive Payments From Industry

WEDNESDAY, May 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- About half of U.S. doctors received payments from the pharmaceutical and medical device industries in 2015, amounting to $2.4 billion, and any form or amount of compensation can influence prescribing behavior, according to research published in the May 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on conflict of interest.

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