May 2017 Briefing - Infectious Disease

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Infectious Disease for May 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Diabetic Foot Ulcers, Infections Significantly Up Burden of Care

WEDNESDAY, May 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and diabetic foot infections (DFIs) are associated with increased risks of admission and outpatient visits, according to a study published online May 11 in Diabetes Care.

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Modified Vancomycin May Help Fight Bacterial Resistance

WEDNESDAY, May 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Vancomycin can be modified to make it much more potent against resistant bacterial infections, according to a study published online May 30 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Social Psychology May Help With Physician Error Disclosure

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Lessons from social psychology can be used to improve behavioral changes in terms of error disclosure, according to research published online May 18 in Medical Education.

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High-Risk Pools May Represent Step Back for U.S. Health Care

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Proposed legislation as part of the American Health Care Act, which includes the option of high-risk pools, is not likely to reduce costs, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online May 23 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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New Bill Intends to Repeal Limits on Physician-Owned Hospitals

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives would repeal the federal law essentially banning construction of physician-owned hospitals and making it difficult for these facilities to grow, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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New Health Care Act Could Result in 23 Million Losing Insurance

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The Republican-led bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that passed the House this month would result in 23 million Americans losing their health insurance coverage, according to a report issued by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO).

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Progress Made on Genetic Test for Anal Cancer

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- DNA methylation testing may be feasible as a molecular triage of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive individuals for high-resolution anoscopy screening, according to a study published online May 18 in Oncotarget.

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Four Separate Events Led to Zika's Introduction Into Florida

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The 2016 Zika outbreak in Florida wasn't due to a single introduction and spread of the virus, but rather at least four separate events, according to research published online May 24 in Nature.

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Streptococcal Throat Infection Linked to Mental Disorders

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with streptococcal throat infection have increased risks of mental disorders, especially obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and tics, according to a study published online May 24 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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New Interactive Module Aims to Clarify Professional Boundaries

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new interactive training module in medical ethics can help physicians to understand professional boundaries, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Two-Dose HPV Vaccine Effective Against Genital Warts

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- New research supports the recent U.S. recommendation for two, rather than three, doses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to protect against genital warts in preteens and teens. The report was published in the June issue of Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

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Path to Empathy Deemed As Vital As Being Empathetic

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Different paths to perspective of another's experience are associated with varying effect on helpers' health during helping behavior, according to a study published online April 16 in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

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Mortality Rates Found Lower at Major Teaching Hospitals

WEDNESDAY, May 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults treated at major teaching facilities are less likely to die in the weeks and months following their discharge than patients admitted to community hospitals, according to research published in the May 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Case of Gnathostomiasis Caused by Roe Ingestion Reported

TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In a case report published online May 4 in The Journal of Dermatology, gnathostomiasis caused by ingestion of raw roe from Oncorhynchus masou ishikawae is described.

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Initial Specimen Diversion Device Cuts Culture Contamination

MONDAY, May 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing blood cultures in an emergency department setting, use of a device that diverts and sequesters the initial 1.5 to 2.0 mL of blood (initial specimen diversion device [ISDD]) is associated with a decrease in blood culture contamination, according to a study published online May 17 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Tips Provided to Help Physicians Plan for Retirement

THURSDAY, May 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should consider their retirement and plan ahead at all stages of their career, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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AIDS Epidemic Could End in U.S. by 2025

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If certain targets are met, the rate of new HIV infections may be down to 12,000 a year by 2025, which would mark a transition toward the end of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, according to research published online May 15 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Treatment in Hospital by Older Doctors Tied to Higher Mortality

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized patients 65 and older may face a slightly higher risk of dying within a month of their admittance when treated by an older versus younger physician, according to research published online May 16 in The BMJ.

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CDC: Slowing of Decline in Number of Uninsured Adults

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The decline in the number of Americans without health insurance stalled in 2016 after five years of progress, according to a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report released Tuesday.

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Acute MI Risk Significantly Up Following Respiratory Infection

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) increases sharply after a respiratory infection, according to a study published in the May issue of the Internal Medicine Journal.

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Plan Suggested for Reducing Health Care Costs

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Health care costs can be reduced, with a nine-step plan suggested as a starting place, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Review: Early Feeding No Harm in Acute Pancreatitis

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute pancreatitis, early feeding seems not to increase adverse events, and may reduce length of hospital stay for mild-to-moderate cases, according to a review published online May 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Few Eligible U.S. Travelers Getting Pre-Trip Measles Vaccine

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of eligible Americans traveling abroad don't get a measles vaccine, and a key reason is lack of concern about the disease, according to a study published online May 16 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Many Seniors With Nonbacterial Acute URI Prescribed Antibiotics

MONDAY, May 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of elderly patients with a nonbacterial acute upper respiratory tract infection (AURI) are prescribed antibiotics, according to research published online May 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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CDC: Steep Rise in New HCV Infections Over Last Five Years

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Reports of new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in the United States nearly tripled over five years, reaching a 15-year high, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Hospitals Need to Be Prepared for Ransomware Attacks

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hackers are increasingly targeting hospitals, using viruses to lock their computer systems and hold sensitive medical data and other files hostage, according to an observation piece published online May 11 in The BMJ.

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Transplanting HCV+ Kidneys Into HCV− Recipients Feasible

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In a research letter published online April 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine, Philadelphia doctors write that they have cleared hepatitis C infections in 10 patients who received kidneys from deceased donors who had the virus.

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CDC: Hep C Infections Among Pregnant Women Increasing

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of hepatitis C (HCV) infection among pregnant women nearly doubled between 2009 and 2014, according to research published in the May 12 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Life Expectancy for HIV+ Patients Up Since Introduction of ART

THURSDAY, May 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults with HIV who get treatment are living longer in North America and Europe, according to a study published online May 10 in The Lancet HIV.

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Practice Prices Linked to Some Measures of Care Coordination

THURSDAY, May 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High-price practices have higher scores on certain measures of care coordination and management, but the overall relationship between higher prices and quality and efficiency of care is weak, according to a report published in the May issue of Health Affairs.

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Outpatient Wait Times Are Longer for Medicaid Recipients

THURSDAY, May 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Medicaid patients have slightly longer waits at medical appointments than those with private insurance, according to a report published in the May issue of Health Affairs.

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Multidrug-Resistant TB Set to Increase Through 2040

THURSDAY, May 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis are expected to increase through 2040, according to a study published online May 9 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Increases in Rates of Insured Don't Harm Continuously Insured

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Increases in insurance coverage from 2008 to 2014 were not associated with worse access to care for continuously insured adults, according to a study published in the May issue of Health Affairs.

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Risk of Zika Infection Appears to Be Low for Pregnant Women

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. women traveling to areas where the Zika virus is circulating might be less likely to be infected than expected, but risk remains, according to research published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Postmarket Safety Events for 32 Percent of Novel Therapeutics

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- From 2001 to 2010, 32 percent of novel therapeutics approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had a postmarket safety event, according to a study published in the May 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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HCV Infection Increasing in Reproductive-Aged Women

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The number of reproductive-aged women with past or present hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is increasing, according to a study published online May 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Evidence-Based Medicine Course Beneficial for Critical Thinking

TUESDAY, May 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An evidence-based medicine (EBM) course has some positive effect on medical student critical thinking (CT), according to a study published online April 27 in the Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine.

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Most Physician Mothers Report Perceived Discrimination

TUESDAY, May 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of physician mothers report perceived discrimination, according to a research letter published online May 8 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Voriconazole Exposure May Affect SCC After Lung Transplant

TUESDAY, May 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For lung transplant (LTx) recipients, prolonged exposure to voriconazole may be associated with the development or recurrence of skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), according to a study published online May 2 in the Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research.

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More Women Than Men Leaving Practice of Medicine

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More women than men leave the practice of medicine, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Eradication of H. pylori Beneficial for Concurrent Rosacea

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with concurrent rosacea and Helicobacter pylori infection, use of standard H. pylori eradication therapy is associated with improvement in rosacea, according to a study published online April 27 in the Journal of Dermatology.

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Poll: Many Americans Concerned About ACA Repeal

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Only one in five Americans support a repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a new HealthDay/Harris Poll reveals.

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CMS Releases Resources to Help With Payment System

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently added three new online resources to assist physicians already participating in the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and those exploring the opportunities available.

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Cost of Zika Virus Outbreak in U.S. Could Be Very High

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An outbreak of Zika virus infection in the United States could be very costly, according to a study published online April 27 in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

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Half of U.S. Doctors Receive Payments From Industry

WEDNESDAY, May 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- About half of U.S. doctors received payments from the pharmaceutical and medical device industries in 2015, amounting to $2.4 billion, and any form or amount of compensation can influence prescribing behavior, according to research published in the May 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on conflict of interest.

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Common Antibiotics May Increase Risk of Miscarriage

MONDAY, May 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Use of macrolides, quinolones, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and metronidazole during pregnancy may increase the risk of miscarriage, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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