May 2016 Briefing - Psychiatry

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for May 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Smoking in Pregnancy Tied to Schizophrenia Risk for Child

TUESDAY, May 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking during pregnancy may increase the risk of the child developing schizophrenia, according to a study published online May 24 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Transformational Leadership Predicts Next Year Absenteeism

TUESDAY, May 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The relationship between transformational leadership and sickness absenteeism is complex, according to a study published online April 21 in Work & Stress.

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AHRQ Communication Toolkit Can Help After Patient Harm Occurs

TUESDAY, May 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new communication toolkit created by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) can help health care organizations and providers communicate with patients and families when harm occurs to patients.

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FDA Approves Probuphine Implant for Opioid Dependence

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first-ever buprenorphine implant to treat opioid dependence, the agency said Thursday in a news release.

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Remaining Uninsured May Be Difficult to Reach Via ACA

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Uninsurance rates have decreased since the introduction of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but reaching the remaining uninsured may prove challenging, according to a health policy brief published online May 23 in Health Affairs.

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Recognition of Patient Expertise Can Improve Adherence

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Recognizing the unique role of patients and their expertise within the physician-patient interaction can help to prevent non-adherence based on disagreement, according to an article published online May 18 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Mental Disorders Were Most Costly in U.S. in 2013

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mental disorders were the most costly conditions in the United States in 2013, with a cost of $201 billion, according to a study published in the May issue of Health Affairs.

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Even First Graders Experience Obesity-Related Bullying, Teasing

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As early as first grade, severely obese children are getting teased and bullied more than normal-weight children, according to a study published online May 25 in Child Development.

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Genetic Analysis Offers Options for Some Developmental Delay

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic analysis can improve diagnosis and management of intellectual developmental disorder and unexplained metabolic abnormalities, according to research published online May 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Many Antidepressant Scripts Written for Off-Label Purpose

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Depression accounts for only a little more than half the antidepressant prescriptions issued by Quebec physicians during the past decade, and two out of every three non-depression prescriptions are for an off-label purpose, according to a research letter published in the May 24/31 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Loss of Y Chromosome in Blood Tied to Alzheimer's Risk in Men

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Men who experience the loss of chromosome Y (LOY) from their blood cells as they age may have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published online May 23 in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

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Review: Hatha Yoga Beneficial for Reducing Anxiety

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hatha yoga is effective for reducing anxiety, and efficacy increases with increasing number of practice hours, according to a meta-analysis published online May 20 in the Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine.

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Opioid Prescriptions Drop for First Time in Two Decades

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a sign that the opioid epidemic might be waning, new data show that the number of opioid prescriptions has dropped for the first time in 20 years.

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Strategies Can Help Streamline Revenue-Related Processes

THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies can be employed to maximize the amount of time available for patient care by streamlining revenue-related processes, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Burnout, Lack of Job Satisfaction Driving Doctors to Cut Hours

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Full-time physicians reporting worsening burnout or decreased job satisfaction are more likely to reduce their work hours, according to a study published in the April issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Sexual Harassment Experienced by One-Third of Female Doctors

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Thirty percent of female physicians face sexual harassment on the job, while close to three-quarters perceive gender bias at work and two-thirds say they have actually experienced it, according to survey findings published in the May 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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For New Antipsychotic Users, Dose, Duration Impact Mortality

TUESDAY, May 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dose and duration of therapy are associated with mortality for new antipsychotic users, according to a study published online May 10 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Beneficial in BED

TUESDAY, May 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is beneficial in binge-eating disorder (BED), with decreased cravings for sweets, savory proteins, and all foods, according to a study published online May 9 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Whole-Body Hyperthermia May Help Ease Depression Symptoms

MONDAY, May 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Whole-body hyperthermia (WBH) may ease depression symptoms for up to six weeks, according to a study published online May 12 in JAMA Psychiatry to coincide with the annual meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, held from May 12 to 14 in Atlanta.

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Religious Service Attendance May Affect Mortality Among Women

MONDAY, May 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who regularly attend religious services may live longer than women who never attend services, according to research published online May 16 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Complementary Medicine Use Up With Chronic Conditions

MONDAY, May 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with multiple chronic conditions frequently use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), according to a study published online May 5 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Fewer Self-Injury Events With Lithium for Bipolar Disorder

FRIDAY, May 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with bipolar disorder taking lithium have lower rates of self-harm and unintentional injury compared to those taking other mood stabilizers, according to research published online May 11 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Even Mild Football Head Injury Can Cause Visual Disturbance

FRIDAY, May 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Repeated blows to the head can cause near point of convergence (NPC), even if the individual impacts aren't strong enough to cause a full-fledged concussion, according to research published online May 12 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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DEA Weighing Change in Medical Marijuana Rules

WEDNESDAY, May 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is weighing whether to loosen its classification of marijuana, which would remove many restrictions on its use in medical research. If that occurs, doctors could start getting answers to the questions they regularly receive from patients regarding marijuana's clinical benefits.

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Depressive Symptoms for Many Caregivers of Critically Ill

WEDNESDAY, May 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many caregivers of critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit (ICU) report high levels of depressive symptoms, according to a study published in the May 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ketamine May Ease Suicidal Thoughts in Major Depression

WEDNESDAY, May 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low doses of ketamine may quickly reduce suicidal thoughts in patients with treatment-resistant depression, according to a study published online May 10 in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

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Yoga, Meditation Show Memory, Mood Benefit in Seniors

WEDNESDAY, May 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A regular meditation practice might benefit older adults beginning to experience memory deficits, according to a study published online May 10 in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

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Marijuana-Linked Fatal MVAs Up in WA State After Legalization

TUESDAY, May 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The number of fatal motor vehicle crashes involving marijuana more than doubled after Washington state legalized the sale of the drug, according to a study from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

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Cutting Brand-Name Drug Use Could Save U.S. $73 Billion

TUESDAY, May 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Americans could save tens of billions of dollars with more efficient drug use, replacing brand-name drugs with their generic equivalents whenever possible, according to a study published online May 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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CDC Establishes New 'Clean Hands Count' Campaign

MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has introduced a new campaign, "Clean Hands Count," to encourage health care professionals, patients, and patients' families to keep their hands clean in order to prevent health care-associated infections.

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Venlafaxine-Induced Rise in Intraocular Pressure Described

MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a case report published online April 30 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology, venlafaxine-induced increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) is described in a patient with open angle glaucoma.

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Preadmission SSRI Use Ups Stroke Mortality in Diabetes

MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetes, preadmission selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use is associated with increased risk of stroke mortality, according to a study published online May 3 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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New Rule Extends FDA Authority Over Tobacco, Nicotine Products

THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that it is banning the sale of electronic cigarettes to minors, as part of its long-awaited plan to extend the agency's regulatory powers across all tobacco products.

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Physician Leadership Training May Help Counteract Burnout

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physician leaders with good leadership qualities are more likely to have employees who are satisfied and do not show signs of burnout, according to a study published in the April issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings and a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Price Transparency Tool Doesn't Cut Health Care Spending

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Employee use of a price transparency tool does not cut health care spending, according to a study published in the May 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC: Behavioral Therapy Recommended First for ADHD

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Behavior modification therapy is preferable to medication for treating children 2 to 5 years old who have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), U.S. health officials say.

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FDA: Brintellix Changing Name to Avoid Confusion With Brilinta

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Following a July 2015 Drug Safety Communication that warned about name confusion between Brintellix and Brilinta resulting in prescribing errors, the antidepressant Brintellix (vortioxetine) is changing its name to Trintellix, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Report: Why Health Care Costs Are Lower in Europe Than U.S.

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- European residents have access to the same health care services as U.S. residents but pay much less, and this is related to several specific factors, according to a report published by INDIGOMED on April 25.

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Advised for Chronic Insomnia

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive behavioral therapy is recommended as the initial treatment for all adults with chronic insomnia disorder, according to a clinical practice guideline published online May 3 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Clinical Practice Guideline
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Calorie Restriction Improves Mood, Health in Non-Obese

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Calorie restriction may improve health, mood, sexual function, and stress levels even in non-obese individuals, according to research published online May 2 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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2017 May Offer Fewer Choices for Affordable Care Act Enrollees

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- With the nation's largest health insurer exiting all but a few Affordable Care Act exchanges next year, some Americans may be left with fewer choices and some might see higher monthly premiums.

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Psychotherapy May Ease Chemo-Related Cognitive Dysfunction

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) might help cancer survivors manage the long-term cognitive dysfunction some experience after chemotherapy, according to research published online May 2 in Cancer.

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FDA Approves Nuplazid for Parkinson's Hallucinations

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Nuplazid (pimavanserin) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinson's disease.

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Distraction Methods During Blood Draws Have Similar Effectiveness

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Three different distraction methods are not significantly different in terms of pain and anxiety reduction in children having their blood drawn, according to a study published online April 26 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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