May 2016 Briefing - Pediatrics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for May 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AHRQ Communication Toolkit Can Help After Patient Harm Occurs

TUESDAY, May 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new communication toolkit created by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) can help health care organizations and providers communicate with patients and families when harm occurs to patients.

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Next-Generation Sequencing Can ID Rare Diseases in Newborns

TUESDAY, May 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Next-generation sequencing may greatly improve a physician's ability to quickly diagnose rare genetic diseases in newborns, according to research published online May 30 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Intermittent Steroids Reduce Some Asthma Exacerbations

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is strong evidence to support intermittent inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) for prevention of wheeze exacerbations in preschool children with intermittent asthma or viral-triggered wheezing, according to a review published online May 26 in Pediatrics.

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CDC: Fatal Abusive Head Trauma Among Children Down in the U.S.

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Half as many infants and preschoolers in the United States are dying from abusive head trauma as in 2009, according to research published in the May 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Remaining Uninsured May Be Difficult to Reach Via ACA

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Uninsurance rates have decreased since the introduction of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but reaching the remaining uninsured may prove challenging, according to a health policy brief published online May 23 in Health Affairs.

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Recognition of Patient Expertise Can Improve Adherence

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Recognizing the unique role of patients and their expertise within the physician-patient interaction can help to prevent non-adherence based on disagreement, according to an article published online May 18 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Even First Graders Experience Obesity-Related Bullying, Teasing

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As early as first grade, severely obese children are getting teased and bullied more than normal-weight children, according to a study published online May 25 in Child Development.

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Prenatal n-3 LCPUFAs Don't Cut IgE-Linked Disease in Children

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal supplementation with omega-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) does not reduce immunoglobulin E (IgE)-associated allergic disease in children, according to a study published online May 25 in Pediatrics.

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Genetic Analysis Offers Options for Some Developmental Delay

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic analysis can improve diagnosis and management of intellectual developmental disorder and unexplained metabolic abnormalities, according to research published online May 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New Ocular Findings in Infants With Zika-Related Microcephaly

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New ocular complications in infants born with Zika-related microcephaly have been identified by researchers. The latest vision findings, published online May 25 in Ophthalmology, add to a growing body of evidence about how Zika may affect children's eye development and vision.

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Low Levels of Hormone Associated With Teen Obesity

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Obese adolescents may have lower levels of the hormone spexin than normal-weight adolescents, according to research published online May 24 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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City Planning for Walkability May Help Curb Diabetes Rates

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pedestrian-friendly ("walkable") neighborhoods have reduced rates of diabetes, according to research published in the May 24/31 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Plastics Chemical BBP Exposure May 'Program' Obesity

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) regulates the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) toward adipogenesis by inducing epigenetic stress, according to research published online May 6 in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology.

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Behavioral Interventions Seem Safe, Beneficial for Infant Sleep

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Two commonly used sleep training strategies appear to have no harmful effect on infants' emotional development, according to research published online May 24 in Pediatrics.

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Hyperglycemia Tied to Outcomes in Pediatric Stroke

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For children with arterial ischemic stroke, infarct volume and hyperglycemia, but not hypertension and fever, correlate with poor neurological outcome, according to research published online May 23 in JAMA Neurology.

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Women Battling Cancer Need More Fertility Preservation Info

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many young female cancer survivors say they don't receive enough information about preserving their fertility, according to a study published online May 23 in Cancer.

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AAP Recommends at Least One Full-Time Nurse in Every School

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Every school should have at least one full-time registered nurse, according to a new American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement published online May 23 in Pediatrics.

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Clinicians Should Ask, Counsel About Firearms

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians ask and counsel their patients about firearms less often than recommended, according to an article published online May 17 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Nonexperts Can Be Trained to Interpret RHD Echocardiograms

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A short computer-based course can train nonexperts in interpretation of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) screening echocardiograms, according to a study published in the June 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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FDA Redesigns Nutrition Facts Label

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Nutrition Facts panel on packaged foods in the United States is about to undergo long-awaited changes, with a redesign emphasizing realistic portion sizes and added sugars.

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Dietary Fat Intake in Adolescence May Affect Breast Density

FRIDAY, May 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who eat high amounts of saturated fats or low amounts of healthier mono- and polyunsaturated fats tend to have denser breasts 15 years later, according to a study published online May 19 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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CDC: Many Aquatic Facilities Closed Due to Safety Violations

FRIDAY, May 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Serious health and safety violations force the closure of thousands of public pools, hot tubs, and water playgrounds every year, according to research published in the May 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Last Year Saw 10 Percent Rise in Motorcycle Deaths in U.S

FRIDAY, May 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Motorcyclist deaths in the United States topped 5,000 last year -- a 10 percent increase from 2014, according to a new report from the Governors Highway Safety Association.

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Early Loss of Islet Sympathetic Nerves in Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, May 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early, marked, and sustained loss of islet sympathetic nerves is seen in type 1, but not type 2, diabetes mellitus, according to a study published online May 13 in Diabetes.

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Strategies Can Help Streamline Revenue-Related Processes

THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies can be employed to maximize the amount of time available for patient care by streamlining revenue-related processes, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Pregabalin in Pregnancy Linked to Increased Risk of Birth Defects

THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The widely prescribed drug pregabalin (Lyrica) may slightly increase the risk for birth defects, according to a study published online May 18 in Neurology.

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Nocturnal Hypoglycemia Often Occurs in Children With T1DM

THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Nocturnal hypoglycemia frequently occurs in children with type 1 diabetes, and is mainly asymptomatic, according to a research letter published online May 13 in Diabetes Care.

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Worse Outcomes for GDM With Impaired Insulin Sensitivity

THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Among women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), impaired insulin sensitivity, but not insulin secretion defects, is associated with a greater risk of adverse outcomes compared with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), according to a study published online May 13 in Diabetes Care.

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Burnout, Lack of Job Satisfaction Driving Doctors to Cut Hours

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Full-time physicians reporting worsening burnout or decreased job satisfaction are more likely to reduce their work hours, according to a study published in the April issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Prophylactic High-Dose rhEPO No Benefit for Preemies

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prophylactic early high-dose recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) given intravenously to very preterm infants does not improve neurodevelopmental outcomes at 2 years corrected age, according to a study published in the May 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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IOM Committee Finds Genetically Engineered Crops Safe

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Crops created through genetic engineering are as safe to eat as crops developed through traditional plant-breeding methods, according to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

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Sexual Harassment Experienced by One-Third of Female Doctors

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Thirty percent of female physicians face sexual harassment on the job, while close to three-quarters perceive gender bias at work and two-thirds say they have actually experienced it, according to survey findings published in the May 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Caudal Block Linked to Post-Urethroplasty Complications

MONDAY, May 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatric patients undergoing urethroplasty, caudal block is associated with surgical complications, according to a study published online May 9 in Anaesthesia.

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Recommendations Developed for Management of Drowning

FRIDAY, May 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations have been developed for prevention and acute management of drowning. The Wilderness Medical Society published the new practice guidelines online April 6 in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine.

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FDA Issues Stronger Warning on Side Effects of Fluoroquinolones

FRIDAY, May 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stronger warnings about the possible side effects of fluoroquinolones were issued Thursday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Even Mild Football Head Injury Can Cause Visual Disturbance

FRIDAY, May 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Repeated blows to the head can cause near point of convergence (NPC), even if the individual impacts aren't strong enough to cause a full-fledged concussion, according to research published online May 12 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Gestational DM Tied to Greater Total Adipose Tissue in Infants

FRIDAY, May 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Infants born to mothers who had gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) may be more likely to carry excess fat in early life, according to research published online May 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Temporary Skin Tattoos Can Evoke Delayed Hypersensitivity

FRIDAY, May 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Black henna, used in temporary skin tattoos, can evoke type IV delayed hypersensitivity reactions, according to an article published online April 27 in BMJ Case Reports.

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Persistent Asthma in Childhood Tied to COPD Risk As Young Adult

THURSDAY, May 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children with persistent asthma and reduced growth of lung function may be at increased risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in early adulthood, according to a study published in the May 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Artificial Pancreas Protocol Deemed Feasible for Younger Kids

THURSDAY, May 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A child-specific version of the modular model predictive control (MMPC) algorithm is feasible and safe for 5- to 9-year-old children with type 1 diabetes, according to the first outpatient single-hormone artificial pancreas (AP) trial in a population of this age, published online May 10 in Diabetes Care.

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High Maternal Glucose May Adversely 'Imprint' Baby

WEDNESDAY, May 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A mother's excess weight gain or elevated blood glucose levels in pregnancy may put her child at increased risk for being overweight or obese, according to a study published online May 6 in Maternal and Child Health Journal.

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Late Reactions in Food Challenges Common

WEDNESDAY, May 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Late reactions in children undergoing food challenges are common and poorly predicted but generally not severe, according to a study published online May 10 in Allergy.

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Marijuana-Linked Fatal MVAs Up in WA State After Legalization

TUESDAY, May 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The number of fatal motor vehicle crashes involving marijuana more than doubled after Washington state legalized the sale of the drug, according to a study from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

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Cutting Brand-Name Drug Use Could Save U.S. $73 Billion

TUESDAY, May 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Americans could save tens of billions of dollars with more efficient drug use, replacing brand-name drugs with their generic equivalents whenever possible, according to a study published online May 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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E-Cigarette Poisonings Rising Quickly Among Young Children

MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Calls to poison control centers about young children's exposure to e-cigarettes have increased significantly in recent years, and those children who are exposed seem to suffer worse health effects than those exposed to traditional cigarettes, according to research published online May 9 in Pediatrics.

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Swaddling May Increase Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Swaddling infants before sleep may increase risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) substantially, according to a review published online May 9 in Pediatrics.

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>40% of Pediatricians Received Industry Payment in 2014

MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In 2014 there were 244,915 industry payments to general pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists, totaling more than $32 million, according to a study published online May 6 in Pediatrics.

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CDC Establishes New 'Clean Hands Count' Campaign

MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has introduced a new campaign, "Clean Hands Count," to encourage health care professionals, patients, and patients' families to keep their hands clean in order to prevent health care-associated infections.

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First Case of Paintball-Linked Liver Injury Described

FRIDAY, May 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A first case of paintball-related blunt liver injury has been described in an article published online April 27 in BMJ Case Reports.

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New Rule Extends FDA Authority Over Tobacco, Nicotine Products

THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that it is banning the sale of electronic cigarettes to minors, as part of its long-awaited plan to extend the agency's regulatory powers across all tobacco products.

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Fluconazole Use May Raise Risk of Certain Birth Defects

THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal use of low-dose fluconazole is associated with cleft lip with cleft palate and d-transposition of the great arteries, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Physician Leadership Training May Help Counteract Burnout

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physician leaders with good leadership qualities are more likely to have employees who are satisfied and do not show signs of burnout, according to a study published in the April issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings and a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Price Transparency Tool Doesn't Cut Health Care Spending

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Employee use of a price transparency tool does not cut health care spending, according to a study published in the May 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC: Behavioral Therapy Recommended First for ADHD

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Behavior modification therapy is preferable to medication for treating children 2 to 5 years old who have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), U.S. health officials say.

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USPSTF: Evidence Lacking for Celiac Disease Screening

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to weigh the potential benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement published online May 3 by the USPSTF.

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Flu Vaccine in Pregnancy Protects Mother and Infant

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who receive influenza vaccination may be protecting their infants as well as themselves against the virus, according to a new report published online May 3 in Pediatrics.

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Still Too Many Antibiotic Prescriptions Being Written

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one-third of the antibiotics prescribed in the United States aren't appropriate for the conditions being treated, according to research published in the May 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Infant Viral Infections Might Raise Risk of Type 1 Diabetes

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Respiratory and viral infections in the first six months of life may increase the odds of a child developing type 1 diabetes by nearly 20 percent, according to a study published in the May 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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High School Football Players Have Most Post-Concussion Symptoms

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- High school football players are more likely to suffer more symptoms after a concussion, and to need more recovery time than their college counterparts; however, those who play in youth football leagues are the most likely to get back on the field less than 24 hours after a concussion, according to research published online May 2 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Report: Why Health Care Costs Are Lower in Europe Than U.S.

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- European residents have access to the same health care services as U.S. residents but pay much less, and this is related to several specific factors, according to a report published by INDIGOMED on April 25.

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2017 May Offer Fewer Choices for Affordable Care Act Enrollees

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- With the nation's largest health insurer exiting all but a few Affordable Care Act exchanges next year, some Americans may be left with fewer choices and some might see higher monthly premiums.

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Patients Often Dissatisfied With Acne Care

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients frequently report ineffective consultations in acne care, according to a study published online April 26 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Distraction Methods During Blood Draws Have Similar Effectiveness

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Three different distraction methods are not significantly different in terms of pain and anxiety reduction in children having their blood drawn, according to a study published online April 26 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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