May 2016 Briefing - Ophthalmology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Ophthalmology for May 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AHRQ Communication Toolkit Can Help After Patient Harm Occurs

TUESDAY, May 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new communication toolkit created by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) can help health care organizations and providers communicate with patients and families when harm occurs to patients.

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Remaining Uninsured May Be Difficult to Reach Via ACA

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Uninsurance rates have decreased since the introduction of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but reaching the remaining uninsured may prove challenging, according to a health policy brief published online May 23 in Health Affairs.

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Recognition of Patient Expertise Can Improve Adherence

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Recognizing the unique role of patients and their expertise within the physician-patient interaction can help to prevent non-adherence based on disagreement, according to an article published online May 18 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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New Ocular Findings in Infants With Zika-Related Microcephaly

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New ocular complications in infants born with Zika-related microcephaly have been identified by researchers. The latest vision findings, published online May 25 in Ophthalmology, add to a growing body of evidence about how Zika may affect children's eye development and vision.

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Visual Impairment Expected to Rise Significantly by 2050

FRIDAY, May 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As baby boomers age, the number of Americans with visual impairment and blindness is expected to double over the next three decades, according to a study published online May 19 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Strategies Can Help Streamline Revenue-Related Processes

THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies can be employed to maximize the amount of time available for patient care by streamlining revenue-related processes, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Burnout, Lack of Job Satisfaction Driving Doctors to Cut Hours

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Full-time physicians reporting worsening burnout or decreased job satisfaction are more likely to reduce their work hours, according to a study published in the April issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Sexual Harassment Experienced by One-Third of Female Doctors

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Thirty percent of female physicians face sexual harassment on the job, while close to three-quarters perceive gender bias at work and two-thirds say they have actually experienced it, according to survey findings published in the May 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Even Mild Football Head Injury Can Cause Visual Disturbance

FRIDAY, May 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Repeated blows to the head can cause near point of convergence (NPC), even if the individual impacts aren't strong enough to cause a full-fledged concussion, according to research published online May 12 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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New Insight Might Aid Diagnosis, Treatment of Sjögren's Syndrome

THURSDAY, May 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Rab3D and Rab27 proteins play an important role in the enhanced release of cathepsin S (CTSS) from lacrimal gland acinar cells (LGAC) in Sjögren's syndrome (SS), according to an experimental study published online April 13 in the American Journal of Physiology-Cell Physiology.

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Membrane-Tube Shunt Device Can Reduce Intraocular Pressure

THURSDAY, May 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Glaucoma surgery using a novel membrane-tube (MT) type glaucoma shunt device (MicroMT) can safely reduce intraocular pressure (IOP), according to a study published online May 3 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

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Cutting Brand-Name Drug Use Could Save U.S. $73 Billion

TUESDAY, May 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Americans could save tens of billions of dollars with more efficient drug use, replacing brand-name drugs with their generic equivalents whenever possible, according to a study published online May 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Topical Bimatoprost Ocular Insert Reduces IOP

TUESDAY, May 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a topical bimatoprost ocular insert is associated with a clinically relevant reduction in mean intraocular pressure (IOP) over six months, according to a study published online May 5 in Ophthalmology.

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CDC Establishes New 'Clean Hands Count' Campaign

MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has introduced a new campaign, "Clean Hands Count," to encourage health care professionals, patients, and patients' families to keep their hands clean in order to prevent health care-associated infections.

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Venlafaxine-Induced Rise in Intraocular Pressure Described

MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a case report published online April 30 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology, venlafaxine-induced increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) is described in a patient with open angle glaucoma.

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Case of Palytoxin-Related Keratitis Described

FRIDAY, May 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a letter to the editor published online April 30 in Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, unilateral palytoxin-induced chemical keratitis is described after a coral expressed its toxin into the patient's eye.

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Eyeglass Device May Benefit Those With Low Vision

THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A device mounted onto eyeglasses enables people considered legally blind to "read" and perform other day-to-day activities, according to a study published online May 5 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Physician Leadership Training May Help Counteract Burnout

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physician leaders with good leadership qualities are more likely to have employees who are satisfied and do not show signs of burnout, according to a study published in the April issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings and a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Price Transparency Tool Doesn't Cut Health Care Spending

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Employee use of a price transparency tool does not cut health care spending, according to a study published in the May 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Report: Why Health Care Costs Are Lower in Europe Than U.S.

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- European residents have access to the same health care services as U.S. residents but pay much less, and this is related to several specific factors, according to a report published by INDIGOMED on April 25.

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2017 May Offer Fewer Choices for Affordable Care Act Enrollees

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- With the nation's largest health insurer exiting all but a few Affordable Care Act exchanges next year, some Americans may be left with fewer choices and some might see higher monthly premiums.

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Glaucoma May Result From White Matter Degeneration

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Glaucoma may be associated with lower fractional anisotropy in the optic radiations, forceps major, and corpus callosum, possibly as a result of white matter degeneration, according to a study published online April 25 in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics.

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