May 2016 Briefing - Allergy

Share this content:

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Allergy for May 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AHRQ Communication Toolkit Can Help After Patient Harm Occurs

TUESDAY, May 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new communication toolkit created by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) can help health care organizations and providers communicate with patients and families when harm occurs to patients.

More Information

Intermittent Steroids Reduce Some Asthma Exacerbations

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is strong evidence to support intermittent inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) for prevention of wheeze exacerbations in preschool children with intermittent asthma or viral-triggered wheezing, according to a review published online May 26 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Remaining Uninsured May Be Difficult to Reach Via ACA

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Uninsurance rates have decreased since the introduction of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but reaching the remaining uninsured may prove challenging, according to a health policy brief published online May 23 in Health Affairs.

Full Text

Recognition of Patient Expertise Can Improve Adherence

FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Recognizing the unique role of patients and their expertise within the physician-patient interaction can help to prevent non-adherence based on disagreement, according to an article published online May 18 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Prenatal n-3 LCPUFAs Don't Cut IgE-Linked Disease in Children

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal supplementation with omega-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) does not reduce immunoglobulin E (IgE)-associated allergic disease in children, according to a study published online May 25 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Urine Metabolomics Linked to Clinical Parameters of Asthma

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Increased urine metabolomic lipid metabolites are associated with clinical parameters in non-obese asthma patients, according to a study published online May 18 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Strategies Can Help Streamline Revenue-Related Processes

THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies can be employed to maximize the amount of time available for patient care by streamlining revenue-related processes, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Burnout, Lack of Job Satisfaction Driving Doctors to Cut Hours

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Full-time physicians reporting worsening burnout or decreased job satisfaction are more likely to reduce their work hours, according to a study published in the April issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Abstract
Full Text

Sexual Harassment Experienced by One-Third of Female Doctors

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Thirty percent of female physicians face sexual harassment on the job, while close to three-quarters perceive gender bias at work and two-thirds say they have actually experienced it, according to survey findings published in the May 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

IOM Committee Finds Genetically Engineered Crops Safe

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Crops created through genetic engineering are as safe to eat as crops developed through traditional plant-breeding methods, according to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

More Information

Temporary Skin Tattoos Can Evoke Delayed Hypersensitivity

FRIDAY, May 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Black henna, used in temporary skin tattoos, can evoke type IV delayed hypersensitivity reactions, according to an article published online April 27 in BMJ Case Reports.

Abstract
Full Text

Persistent Asthma in Childhood Tied to COPD Risk As Young Adult

THURSDAY, May 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children with persistent asthma and reduced growth of lung function may be at increased risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in early adulthood, according to a study published in the May 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Late Reactions in Food Challenges Common

WEDNESDAY, May 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Late reactions in children undergoing food challenges are common and poorly predicted but generally not severe, according to a study published online May 10 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drug Allergy Passport Advised for Patients With Hypersensitivity

TUESDAY, May 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A drug allergy passport, providing information on culprit drugs, clinical manifestations, and alternate drugs to prescribe, should be provided to patients with drug hypersensitivity, according to a position paper published online May 4 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cutting Brand-Name Drug Use Could Save U.S. $73 Billion

TUESDAY, May 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Americans could save tens of billions of dollars with more efficient drug use, replacing brand-name drugs with their generic equivalents whenever possible, according to a study published online May 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC Establishes New 'Clean Hands Count' Campaign

MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has introduced a new campaign, "Clean Hands Count," to encourage health care professionals, patients, and patients' families to keep their hands clean in order to prevent health care-associated infections.

More Information

Physician Leadership Training May Help Counteract Burnout

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physician leaders with good leadership qualities are more likely to have employees who are satisfied and do not show signs of burnout, according to a study published in the April issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings and a report published by the American Medical Association.

More Information

Price Transparency Tool Doesn't Cut Health Care Spending

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Employee use of a price transparency tool does not cut health care spending, according to a study published in the May 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Report: Why Health Care Costs Are Lower in Europe Than U.S.

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- European residents have access to the same health care services as U.S. residents but pay much less, and this is related to several specific factors, according to a report published by INDIGOMED on April 25.

Full Text

2017 May Offer Fewer Choices for Affordable Care Act Enrollees

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- With the nation's largest health insurer exiting all but a few Affordable Care Act exchanges next year, some Americans may be left with fewer choices and some might see higher monthly premiums.

More Information

Markers That Predict Omalizumab Response Identified

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Baseline serum periostin levels and levels of serum free immunoglobulin E (IgE) during treatment follow-up may be useful in assessing response to omalizumab treatment for asthma, according to a study published online April 26 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease


More in Home

Both Statin, Non-Statin Therapies Effective for Lowering LDL

Both Statin, Non-Statin Therapies Effective for Lowering LDL

Dietary changes, other meds, and even surgery can lower cardiovascular risk similarly to statins

Negative Effects Seen With Video Gaming 9 Hours/Week

Negative Effects Seen With Video Gaming 9+ Hours/Week

Benefits seen with one hour a week, but behavioral problems appear to rise at nine hours a week

Improved Adult Lung Function Linked to Childhood Farm Life

Improved Adult Lung Function Linked to Childhood Farm ...

First study to report beneficial effects of growing up on a farm on adult FEV1

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »