May 2015 Briefing - Psychiatry

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for May 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA: Physicians Driving the Slowing of Health Care Costs

FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Low physician spending is contributing to an overall slowing of health care costs, according to a viewpoint piece published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Celecoxib Safe, Effective for Brucellosis-Associated Depression

FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Celecoxib seems safe and effective for treatment of depression due to acute brucellosis, according to a study published online May 26 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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White Matter Changes May ID Markers of Alzheimer's Earlier

WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Damage to the brain's white matter may be an early sign of certain types of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published online May 27 in Radiology.

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Hospice May Help Surviving Spouse Cope With Death

WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hospice care may help a surviving spouse better cope with depression following the death of a loved one, according to a study published online May 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Caution Urged When Using EHR Shortcut Features

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Caution should be exercised with use of electronic health record (EHR) documentation short cuts, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Costs of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome on the Rise

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of infants born to American mothers who are chronic opioid users is rising, as are the costs of treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), researchers report. The findings were published online May 15 in the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

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Self-Hypnosis Training Doesn't Cut Epidural Use

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Self-hypnosis training does not reduce women's epidural use during childbirth, according to a study published online May 11 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Increasing Omega-3 Intake May Boost Cognitive Flexibility

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming more omega-3 fatty acids may benefit patients at risk for Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published online May 21 in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.

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Physical Resistance Training Ups Sexual Function in PCOS

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physical resistance training (PRT) is associated with significant improvement in sexual function among women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), according to a study published online May 18 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Large Practices Focused on Small Selection of EHR Products

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sixty percent of clinicians in practices with 26 or more clinicians report use of one of 10 electronic health record (EHR) products, according to a report published by AmericanEHR Partners.

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Front Desk Staff Has Key Role in Managing Practice Cash Flow

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Three steps that can be implemented by front desk staff can help increase practices' cash flow, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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AMA: Avoiding Distress in Medical School

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Understanding the key drivers underlying medical students' distress can help address the issues and enhance student well-being, according to an article published by the American Medical Association.

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Sexual Assault at 'Epidemic Levels' Among College Women

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Almost one out of every five young women were raped or experienced attempted rape during their freshman year at a large private university in upstate New York, a new study reports. The findings were published in the June issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Mental Health Services Up for U.S. Children

THURSDAY, May 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of U.S. children and teens being treated for mental health issues has risen by about 50 percent in the past 20 years -- with most of those children having relatively mild symptoms, according to research published in the May 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Anxiety Reported by More Than 4 Million Working Americans

THURSDAY, May 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study finds that 4.3 million Americans with full-time jobs had an anxiety disorder in the past year. That number represents 3.7 percent of full-time workers aged 18 and older, according to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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History of Depression May Raise Parkinson's Risk

THURSDAY, May 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with a history of depression seem to have a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to new research published online May 20 in Neurology.

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Pain Med Rx + Medical Cannabis Doesn't Seem to Up Abuse Risk

TUESDAY, May 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical marijuana users don't appear to increase their risk for drug or alcohol abuse if they also take prescription pain medications (PPMs), according to research published in the May issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

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Tips Provided for Doctors Who Want to Move to Private Practice

MONDAY, May 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For physicians who want to transition to private practice, several factors need consideration, including finances, legal matters, and insurance, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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CDC: Rates of ADHD Diagnoses Essentially Unchanged

FRIDAY, May 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One in 10 children and teens have been diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a May data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. That number has remained relatively steady since 2007, according to government estimates.

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Tramadol-Related ER Visits Up 2005 to 2011

THURSDAY, May 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There was a sharp rise in the number of emergency department visits involving tramadol between 2005 and 2011, two new government reports show.

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Binge Eating Disorder Creates Significant Health Care Burden

THURSDAY, May 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health care costs are similar for patients with binge eating disorder (BED) and those with eating disorder not otherwise specified without BED (EDNOS-only), and are significantly higher compared with costs of matched patients without an eating disorder (NED), according to a study published online May 8 in the International Journal Eating Disorders.

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Cognitive Improvements With Active Singing in Dementia

THURSDAY, May 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An active singing program can improve cognition and life satisfaction among individuals with dementia in an assisted living facility, according to a letter to the editor published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Medical Marijuana Fails to Improve Symptoms in Dementia

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose oral tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) may not ease the common behavioral symptoms that affect people with dementia, according to a small study published online May 13 in Neurology.

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Depression Tied to Higher Stroke Risk, Even After Remission

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Depression in older adults appears to significantly increase the risk of a stroke, even after depressive symptoms remit, a new study suggests. The report was published online May 13 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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High-Cacao Content Chocolate Has Acute Electrocortical Effect

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of high cacao chocolate is associated with an acute stimulating effect on the human brain and vasoconstrictive effects on the peripheral vasculature, according to a study published in NeuroRegulation.

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Protein Seen in Parkinson's May Activate Immune System

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A protein known to accumulate in Parkinson's disease and other degenerative brain disorders, a-synuclein, could activate the brain's immune defenses, researchers say. Their study was published in the May 12 issue of Science Signaling.

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ADT for Prostate Cancer Tied to Impaired Cognition

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Men undergoing androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) to treat prostate cancer may experience impaired cognitive function within the first six months that persists for at least a year, a new study suggests. The report was published online May 11 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Lower Sleep Quality for Patients With Psoriasis Vulgaris

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with controls, patients with psoriasis vulgaris do not have significant differences in general psychiatric symptoms and strategies for coping, but do have lower sleep quality, according to a study published online May 6 in the International Journal of Dermatology.

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New Health Care Index Reports Increases in Consumer Costs

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new Health Care Index shows increases in consumer costs, according to a report published by U.S. News & World Report.

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Guidance Offered to Help Doctors Deal With 'Dr. Google'

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Good communication is the key to resolving conflicts between the tests and treatment a patient may want based on online searches and those a physician believes are necessary, according to an article published online in Medical Economics.

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Nondisclosure Clauses Often Used in Malpractice Settlements

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nondisclosure clauses are frequently used in malpractice settlement agreements, according to research published online May 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Misconceptions About Miscarriage Common

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Misconceptions about miscarriages are common, and those mistaken beliefs can make the experience even more painful for those who suffer through it, a new survey reveals. The findings were published online May 6 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Adding Olive Oil, Nuts to Diet Boosts Aging Brain Health

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adding more olive oil or nuts to a Mediterranean diet -- one rich in fruits, vegetables, fish, and whole grains and low in red meat -- may help improve cognitive function with advancing age, a new study suggests. The report was published online May 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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AMA: Six Traits of Financially Prepared Female Physicians

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The traits of a financially prepared female physician include having a retirement portfolio that is on track or ahead of schedule for age and career stage, having a liquid emergency fund, and feeling adequately protected in the event of a disability, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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PTSD Associated With Premature Senescence

FRIDAY, May 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) seems to be associated with premature aging, according to a review published online May 7 in The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

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Medical Students Want to Focus Learning on Preparing for Future

THURSDAY, May 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students report wanting to learn more about topics that are not currently being taught, including leadership training, health policy, health economics, and experiential learning, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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ACA Tied to Nearly 17 Million Gaining Health Coverage

THURSDAY, May 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As a result of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), nearly 17 million previously uninsured Americans now have health coverage, according to a 2013 to 2015 report from the Rand Corporation.

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Strategies Provided for Maximizing Payment

WEDNESDAY, May 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should use standard billing practices, including regular statements, to maximize accounts, and know that collection agencies and lawyers can help collect payment when necessary, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Five 'Top Issues' to Be Discussed at AMA Medical Student Forum

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Issues that will be at the forefront of the National Medical Student Meeting include vaccinations, health care economics, Medicaid expansion, medical education loans, and the nationwide opioid epidemic, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Cuts in Epilepsy Drugs Boost Children's Post-Op IQ

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in children is tied to higher IQ post-epilepsy surgery, according to a study published online April 21 in the Annals of Neurology.

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