May 2015 Briefing - Pediatrics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for May 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA: Physicians Driving the Slowing of Health Care Costs

FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Low physician spending is contributing to an overall slowing of health care costs, according to a viewpoint piece published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Teens More Satisfied Than Adults With Lumbar Disc Herniation Sx

FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent patients are more satisfied with surgery for lumbar disc herniation than younger or older adults, according to a study published in the June 1 issue of The Spine Journal.

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14.9 Million New Cancer Cases Worldwide in 2013

THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Between 1990 and 2013, the proportion of deaths worldwide caused by cancer rose from 12 to 15 percent. During that time, years of healthy life lost to cancer increased 29 percent, according to data on 28 types of cancer in 188 countries published online May 28 in JAMA Oncology.

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U.S. Organ Donation Rates Highest in Midwest

THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, organ donor rates are highest in the Midwest and lowest in New York state, according to a report published online May 28 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Fewer U.S. Hospitals Sending New Moms Home With Formula

WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While the percentage of hospitals that send breastfeeding mothers home with formula packs has fallen dramatically during the last several years, about one-third of U.S. hospitals still do so, according to a study published online May 25 in Pediatrics.

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Umbilical Cord Clamping Delay Found Beneficial in Boys

WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Waiting about three minutes to clamp the umbilical cord following infant delivery may help improve children's fine-motor and social skills at age 4 years, according to a study published online May 26 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Soy Supplements Deemed Ineffective in Asthma Care

WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Despite hints from prior research that soy supplements might help asthma patients breathe easier, a new study indicates the nutrient has no beneficial effect on lung function. The findings were published in the May 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Caution Urged When Using EHR Shortcut Features

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Caution should be exercised with use of electronic health record (EHR) documentation short cuts, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Return to Sports Starts at Three Months Post Scoliosis Surgery

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), surgeons are allowing return to sports starting at three months after corrective surgery, according to research published in the May 1 issue of The Spine Journal.

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Factors Linked to Development of Celiac Disease Identified

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Certain perinatal factors, including sex of the child, maternal celiac disease, and type 1 diabetes, are associated with development of celiac disease in children, according to a study published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Costs of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome on the Rise

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of infants born to American mothers who are chronic opioid users is rising, as are the costs of treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), researchers report. The findings were published online May 15 in the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

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Higher Altitude Linked With Higher SIDS Risk

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher altitude may up the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), according to a new study published online May 25 in Pediatrics.

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Large Practices Focused on Small Selection of EHR Products

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sixty percent of clinicians in practices with 26 or more clinicians report use of one of 10 electronic health record (EHR) products, according to a report published by AmericanEHR Partners.

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Front Desk Staff Has Key Role in Managing Practice Cash Flow

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Three steps that can be implemented by front desk staff can help increase practices' cash flow, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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AMA: Avoiding Distress in Medical School

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Understanding the key drivers underlying medical students' distress can help address the issues and enhance student well-being, according to an article published by the American Medical Association.

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CDC: Smoking Rates on Decline in Many States

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoking continues to decline in about half of American states, according to the latest U.S. government estimates. The new report was published in the May 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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School Scoliosis Screening Has Sustained Effectiveness

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- School scoliosis screening can have sustained clinical effectiveness in identifying patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of The Spine Journal.

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Sexual Assault at 'Epidemic Levels' Among College Women

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Almost one out of every five young women were raped or experienced attempted rape during their freshman year at a large private university in upstate New York, a new study reports. The findings were published in the June issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Mental Health Services Up for U.S. Children

THURSDAY, May 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of U.S. children and teens being treated for mental health issues has risen by about 50 percent in the past 20 years -- with most of those children having relatively mild symptoms, according to research published in the May 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CDC Warns Against 'Dangerous Breath Holding' in Water

THURSDAY, May 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials are warning about accidental drownings from underwater breath-holding games and exercises.

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Proper Analysis Over Intuition for Avoiding Improper Antibiotic Use

THURSDAY, May 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Misdiagnosis often leads to improper antibiotic use in hospitals, according to a study published online May 18 in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

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Regional Anesthesia May Be Best in Infant Hernia Surgeries

WEDNESDAY, May 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Infants undergoing herniorrhaphy may fare better with use of awake regional anesthesia (RA) over general anesthesia (GA), according to research published online May 14 in Anesthesiology.

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Washington D.C. Nabs Highest American Fitness Index Ranking

TUESDAY, May 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Washington, D.C, is the fittest of the 50 largest cities in the United States, followed by Minneapolis-St. Paul and San Diego, according to the eighth annual American Fitness Index (AFI) rankings from the American College of Sports Medicine and the Anthem Foundation.

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Tips Provided for Doctors Who Want to Move to Private Practice

MONDAY, May 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For physicians who want to transition to private practice, several factors need consideration, including finances, legal matters, and insurance, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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CDC: Untreated Swimming Water Can Foster Norovirus

FRIDAY, May 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An outbreak of gastrointestinal illness that was traced back to an Oregon lake has led U.S. health officials to issue guidelines on swimming hygiene.

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CDC: Rates of ADHD Diagnoses Essentially Unchanged

FRIDAY, May 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One in 10 children and teens have been diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a May data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. That number has remained relatively steady since 2007, according to government estimates.

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Study Considers Antibiotics-First Approach to Appendicitis

THURSDAY, May 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An antibiotics-first approach could be considered for specific patients with appendicitis, according to a case vignette published in the May 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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HPV Vaccination of Females Has Some Indirect Benefit for Males

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Males benefit indirectly when girls are immunized against human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a new study published online May 12 in The BMJ.

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Increased Risk of Cancer Seen for Offspring of Older Fathers

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who were born to older fathers may be at increased risk for blood and immune system cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma, according to a study published online May 11 in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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Positive + Negative Treatment Recs Cut Antibiotic Rx

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For children with viral acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI), combined use of positive and negative treatment recommendations is associated with reduced risk of antibiotic prescribing, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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No Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes for Tdap at 32 Weeks

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccination at 32 weeks of gestation is not associated with adverse pregnancy or neonatal outcomes, according to a study published online May 6 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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New Health Care Index Reports Increases in Consumer Costs

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new Health Care Index shows increases in consumer costs, according to a report published by U.S. News & World Report.

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Guidance Offered to Help Doctors Deal With 'Dr. Google'

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Good communication is the key to resolving conflicts between the tests and treatment a patient may want based on online searches and those a physician believes are necessary, according to an article published online in Medical Economics.

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Codeine Rx for New Mothers Trending Down

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer new mothers have been prescribed codeine since public health officials warned about a rare, but potential risk of overdose for breastfeeding babies, according to study results reported in the May 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Decision Support Can Help Family Doctors Cut Radiation Exposure

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Point-of-care decision support can help family physicians select imaging that lowers pediatric radiation exposure and is in accordance with current guidelines, according to a study published in the May-June issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine.

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Nondisclosure Clauses Often Used in Malpractice Settlements

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nondisclosure clauses are frequently used in malpractice settlement agreements, according to research published online May 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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AMA: Six Traits of Financially Prepared Female Physicians

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The traits of a financially prepared female physician include having a retirement portfolio that is on track or ahead of schedule for age and career stage, having a liquid emergency fund, and feeling adequately protected in the event of a disability, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Some Childhood Cancer Survivors at Higher Risk of Later Obesity

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Certain treatments may increase a childhood cancer survivor's risk of obesity later in life, according to research published online May 11 in Cancer.

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Chlorofluorocarbon Ban Tied to Sharp Rise in Inhaler Cost

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Federal action to protect the ozone layer has resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of asthma inhalers in recent years, according to new research. The study, published online May 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine, is the first-ever attempt to assess the impact of the ban on out-of-pocket costs for albuterol inhalers.

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Lasting Atopy Risk in Females With Neonatal Vitamin A Rx

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal vitamin A supplementation (NVAS) is associated with increased long-term risk of atopy in females, but not males, according to a study published online May 2 in Allergy.

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Active Video Games Offer Health Benefit for Children/Teens

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Active video games (AVGs) are a good alternative to sedentary behavior, and can provide health benefits comparable to laboratory-based exercise or field-based physical activity, according to research published online May 6 in Obesity Reviews.

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CCHD Screening Would Detect Many Nonsyndromic Cases

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Universal critical congenital heart defect (CCHD) screening is expected to detect a considerable number of nonsyndromic CCHD cases, but a similar number of false-negative screenings are also likely, according to a study published online May 11 in Pediatrics.

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Shortened Fasting Feasible for Children Undergoing Surgery

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of pulmonary aspiration is low in children undergoing elective surgery, even when allowed free clear fluids until called to the operating suite, according to research published online May 4 in Pediatric Anesthesia.

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Maternal SDB Doesn't Affect Infant Neurodevelopment

FRIDAY, May 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal sleep disordered breathing (SDB) during pregnancy does not affect infant neurodevelopment, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Immune System Stays Depleted Up to Three Years Post Measles

FRIDAY, May 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children who survive a measles infection remain vulnerable to other potentially deadly infections for as long as two or three years after the measles infection, according to research published in the May 8 issue of Science.

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Medical Students Want to Focus Learning on Preparing for Future

THURSDAY, May 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students report wanting to learn more about topics that are not currently being taught, including leadership training, health policy, health economics, and experiential learning, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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ACA Tied to Nearly 17 Million Gaining Health Coverage

THURSDAY, May 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As a result of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), nearly 17 million previously uninsured Americans now have health coverage, according to a 2013 to 2015 report from the Rand Corporation.

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Strategies Provided for Maximizing Payment

WEDNESDAY, May 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should use standard billing practices, including regular statements, to maximize accounts, and know that collection agencies and lawyers can help collect payment when necessary, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Acupuncture Effective for Post-Tonsillectomy Pain in Children

WEDNESDAY, May 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture, in addition to conventional analgesic treatment, is an effective treatment for post-tonsillectomy pain in children, according to a study published in the June issue of Pediatric Anesthesia.

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Hospital Rates of Active Tx Impact Survival in Very Preterm

WEDNESDAY, May 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For infants born at 22, 23, or 24 weeks of gestation, differences in hospital rates of active treatment explain some between-hospital differences in survival, according to a study published in the May 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Many Foods Marketed to Children Don't Meet Nutrition Guidelines

WEDNESDAY, May 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of the food and beverage products marketed to children do not meet the federal Interagency Working Group's nutrition recommendations, according to a study published April 23 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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CDC: U.S. Birth Rate Reaches Historic Low

TUESDAY, May 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. birth rate remained at an all-time low in 2013, due largely to a significant drop in teen births, new research shows. The report, first released in January, was published online May 4 in Pediatrics.

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Fetal/Infant Death Risk Lowest at 37 Weeks in Twin Pregnancies

TUESDAY, May 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For twin pregnancies, fetal/infant death risk seems to be minimized at 37 weeks' gestation, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Concussion in Football Often Occurs During Practice

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Data on more than 20,000 young football players across the United States reveal that more than 57 percent of concussed high school and college players were injured at practice, not games. Among youth football players, almost half of concussions were sustained during practice. These findings were published online May 4 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Waning Immunity Seen Post-Tdap Booster in Preteens

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine given to preteens loses a large measure of effectiveness within a few years, new research reveals. The study findings are published online May 4 in Pediatrics.

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Five 'Top Issues' to Be Discussed at AMA Medical Student Forum

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Issues that will be at the forefront of the National Medical Student Meeting include vaccinations, health care economics, Medicaid expansion, medical education loans, and the nationwide opioid epidemic, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Cuts in Epilepsy Drugs Boost Children's Post-Op IQ

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in children is tied to higher IQ post-epilepsy surgery, according to a study published online April 21 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Computerized Visual Acuity Test Effective for Children

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A computerized visual acuity-based screening program that employs a rapid, age-specific standardized algorithm is effective and practical for screening 3- to 7-year-old children, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus.

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High Doses of Triptorelin Needed for Ovarian Suppression in SLE

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For female patients with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who require treatment with cyclophosphamide, sustained complete ovarian suppression is achieved in 90 percent of the patients with triptorelin at a weight-adjusted dose of 120 µg/kg body weight, according to a study published in the May issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Church-Based Intervention Linked to Healthy Lifestyle Changes

FRIDAY, May 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A pilot church-based diabetes self-management intervention in a Latino community is associated with improvement in lifestyle factors that affect diabetes risk, according to a study published online April 28 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Fewer Drunk Driving Events Tied to Boost in U.S. Economy

FRIDAY, May 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A dramatic drop in the number of alcohol-related car accidents over the past three decades may have helped fuel the U.S. economy, a new study suggests. The findings were published online April 29 in Injury Prevention.

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