March 2016 Briefing - Psychiatry

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for March 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Genetic Factors Associated With Cannabis Dependence Identified

THURSDAY, March 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Specific cannabis dependence risk alleles have been identified, according to a study published online March 30 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Naltrexone ER Injection Cuts Opioid Relapse Rate in Inmates

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Extended-release naltrexone is associated with a lower rate of opioid relapse than usual treatment among criminal justice offenders, according to a study published in the March 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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No Benefit for Longer-Term Antibiotic Tx in Lyme Disease

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Longer-term antibiotic treatment does not improve health-related quality of life compared with shorter-term treatment among patients with persistent symptoms attributed to Lyme disease, according to a study published in the March 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Elevated Carcinoembryonic Antigen Described in Anorexia

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a case report published online March 25 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders, elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels are observed in a male patient with anorexia nervosa (AN).

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Antipsychotics Not Effective for Delirium in Hospitalized Patients

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antipsychotic medications do not appear to be effective for preventing or treating delirium in adult medical or surgical inpatients, according to a review published online March 23 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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AMA Addresses Elements of Team-Based Care Model

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The elements of a team-based care model are described in a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Tailored Intervention by PCPs Slightly Cuts Depression

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An intervention based on personal predictors of risk for depression implemented by primary care physicians (PCPs) provides a modest reduction in the incidence of major depression compared to usual care, according to a study published online March 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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CDC: Tips Anti-Smoking Ad Campaign Still Having Impact

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Three years into the campaign, ads targeting smoking are still having a significant impact, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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How Can We Fix the Wage Gap Among Female Physicians?

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women doctors can address the gender wage disparity by understanding the reasons why they earn less, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Few ER Doctors Ask Suicidal Patients About Firearm Access

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Only half of suicidal patients in U.S. emergency departments are asked if they have access to guns, according to a study published online March 17 in Depression and Anxiety.

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Teens With Autism More Likely to Develop Type 2 Diabetes

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), according to a study published online March 22 in Diabetes Care.

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Transcranial Stimulation May Ease Symptoms of Anorexia

FRIDAY, March 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Repetitive transcranial stimulation (rTMS) may ease major symptoms of anorexia nervosa, according to a study published online March 23 in PLOS ONE.

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Maternal Obesity Tied to Increase in Child Behavior Problems

THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal obesity is associated with a small increase in child behavior problems, according to a study published online March 21 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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SSRIs Do Not Appear to Increase Cardiovascular Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) don't appear to raise cardiovascular risk among young and middle-age patients, according to research published online March 22 in The BMJ.

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Antipsychotics May Up Early Mortality Risk in Parkinson's

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Parkinson's disease patients who are given antipsychotics to treat dementia and psychosis may be more likely to die early, according to research published online March 21 in JAMA Neurology.

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Mindful Meditation Technique May Help Ease Chronic Low Back Pain

TUESDAY, March 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) may be more effective than standard medical care for managing low back pain, according to a study published in the March 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Stress Management Could Help Optimize Cardiac Rehab

TUESDAY, March 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of stress management training can make cardiac rehabilitation programs more effective, according to a study published online March 21 in Circulation.

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FDA: Most Powdered Medical Gloves Should Be Banned in U.S.

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants to ban most powdered medical gloves, saying they pose serious health risks to patients and health care providers alike.

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Cognitive Impairment Affects Speech of Parkinson's Patients

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Declines in cognition could have a greater impact on the ability of Parkinson's disease patients to converse than physical impairment, according to research published online March 16 in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease.

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Case Before Supreme Court May Expose Doctors to Large Fines

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A case before a state supreme court could potentially expose physicians to large fines based on a legal technicality relating to what they should have known, rather than what they knew, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Meditation-Induced Analgesia Not Mediated by Endogenous Opioids

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mindfulness meditation-induced analgesia does not rely on opioidergic mechanisms, according to a study published in the March 16 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

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Spending on Prescription Meds Up About 5 Percent in 2015

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Spending on prescription medications for insured Americans increased about 5 percent in 2015, with the increase half of that seen in 2014, the Associated Press reported.

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Free Training Being Offered for Substance Use Disorder Tx

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Free training is being offered to physicians in medication-assisted treatment (MAT), which combines use of medication with counseling and other support for patients with substance use disorders, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Hospitalist Morale Index Is Validated Instrument

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Hospitalist Morale Index is a valid instrument for assessing hospitalist morale, according to a study published online March 10 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Disruptive Patients Distract Docs, May Receive Compromised Care

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Disruptive patients may get worse care from physicians, according to a study published online March 7 in BMJ Quality & Safety. The findings aren't definitive because the researchers tested how physicians responded in fictional vignettes, instead of real-life encounters. Still, the results suggest that such patients distract physicians from doing their jobs.

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Suppression of Substance Abuse Claims Impacts Diagnoses

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) policy suppressing substance abuse-related claims in the Medicare and Medicaid Research Identifiable Files correlated with an immediate reduction in inpatient diagnoses for conditions commonly co-occurring with substance abuse, according to a research letter published in the March 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Mayo Clinic Has Established Model to Help Battle Burnout

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an effort to reduce burnout among physicians, the Mayo Clinic is initiating a model to raise camaraderie and increase collaboration, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Abruptly Quitting Appears to Work Best for Smoking Cessation

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Quitting cigarettes "cold turkey" beats a more gradual approach, according to research published online March 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Guidance Offered for Negotiating Higher Rates From Payers

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Negotiations to increase payment from insurance companies can be extremely difficult, although it is possible to get a payment increase, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Few Care Management Processes Used for Depression

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. primary care practices use less than one care management process for depression, on average, according to a study published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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Physicians' Contracts Can Affect Patients, Professionalism

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Problematic clauses in physicians' contracts can impact patient care and professionalism, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online March 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Experimental Study Supports Health Effects of 'Bromances'

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate stress encourages male bonding, and prosocial behavior improves stress resiliency, according to an experimental study in rats published online Feb. 2 in Neuropsychopharmacology.

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PTSD Symptomatology Linked to Increased Risk of RA

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology is associated with the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in women, according to a study published in the March issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Attachment to God Linked to Improved Worker Contentment

TUESDAY, March 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Secure attachment to God is associated with affective organizational commitment and job satisfaction, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in the Review of Religious Research.

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N-Acetylcysteine Augmentation Therapy May Be Effective for OCD

MONDAY, March 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- N-acetylcysteine (NAC) appears to be effective as an augmentative agent for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), according to a study published online March 2 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Iron Supplement in Infancy May Benefit Motor Development

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Iron supplementation in infancy, regardless of iron supplementation in pregnancy, improves gross motor development at age 9 months, according to research published online March 2 in Pediatrics.

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SCOTUS: States Can't Force Health Care Data Release

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Supreme Court has ruled against state efforts to collect health care data from insurance plans.

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Spouse Education Level May Impact Choice for Rural Practice

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who are married to a highly-educated spouse are less likely to work in rural underserved areas, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Social-Emotional Difficulty Linked to Toddler Mobile Tech Use

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is a correlation between increased social-emotional difficulties in toddlers and the tendency of low-income parents to use mobile technology to calm their children in certain situations, according to a research letter published online Feb. 29 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Metabolic Syndrome Tied to Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and MCI progression to dementia is increased in association with metabolic syndrome (MetS), according to a study published online Feb. 29 in JAMA Neurology.

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Dementia Incidence Higher Than CHD in Very Elderly

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For adults aged 80 years or older, the incidence of dementia is greater than that of coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study published in the March 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Pre-Op Stress Tied to Post-Op Pain, Anxiety in Scoliosis Patients

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Attention to preoperative stress in adolescents undergoing scoliosis surgery may reduce levels of postoperative pain as well as anxiety and social and attention problems in the recovery period, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Similar Sensitivity for CBCL-AP, CRS-R in Diagnosing ADHD

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Child Behavior Checklist-Attention Problem (CBCL-AP) scale and Conners Rating Scale-Revised (CRS-R) yield moderate sensitivity for diagnosing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents, according to research published online Feb. 29 in Pediatrics.

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