March 2016 Briefing - Ophthalmology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Ophthalmology for March 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Reactivation of HSV Described in Patient After Cataract Surgery

THURSDAY, March 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a letter to the editor published online March 24 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology, a case of reactivation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) uveitis is described in a patient with unexplained persistent elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) following intraocular surgery.

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AMA Addresses Elements of Team-Based Care Model

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The elements of a team-based care model are described in a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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How Can We Fix the Wage Gap Among Female Physicians?

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women doctors can address the gender wage disparity by understanding the reasons why they earn less, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Retinal Ganglion Cells Derived From Pluripotent Stem Cells

FRIDAY, March 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stepwise differentiation through an enriched retinal progenitor intermediary facilitates the accomplishment of deriving retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), according to research published online March 21 in STEM CELLS.

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Diet High in Vitamin C May Help Delay Cataract Formation

THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- High intake of dietary vitamin C may help delay the onset of cataracts, according to research published online March 23 in Ophthalmology.

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Alterations in Eye Microbiota Linked to Contact Lenses

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Contact lenses may alter the natural bacterial environment of eyes, according to new findings published online March 22 in mBio.

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Endogenous Endophthalmitis ID'd After Breast Implant Surgery

TUESDAY, March 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a case report published online March 17 in JAMA Ophthalmology, bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis with chorioretinal involvement due to Candida albicans a few hours after breast augmentation surgery has been documented.

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FDA: Most Powdered Medical Gloves Should Be Banned in U.S.

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants to ban most powdered medical gloves, saying they pose serious health risks to patients and health care providers alike.

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Intra-Arterial Chemo Promising for Intraocular Retinoblastoma

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intra-arterial chemotherapy appears to be promising for intraocular retinoblastoma, according to a review published online March 17 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Central Corneal Thickness Influenced by Body Position

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Central corneal thickness (CCT) is influenced by body position, with a decrease noted in the first 30 minutes of supine positioning, according to a study published online March 14 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

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Bevacizumab Use in Preemies Associated With Disabilities

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Bevacizumab (Avastin) used to treat retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) may be linked to serious disabilities such as cerebral palsy and hearing loss, according to a study published online March 17 in Pediatrics.

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MTHFR Polymorphism, Higher Homocysteine Up Cataract Risk

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism and elevated homocysteine levels contribute to the risk of cortical cataract, separately and together, according to a study published online March 17 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Case Before Supreme Court May Expose Doctors to Large Fines

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A case before a state supreme court could potentially expose physicians to large fines based on a legal technicality relating to what they should have known, rather than what they knew, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Hydroxychloroquine Doesn't Alter Inner Retina Thickness

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Inner retina thickness does not change with short- or long-term hydroxychloroquine use, according to research published online March 17 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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No Added Benefits With Laser in Cataract Sx + Toric Lens Insertion

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing toric intraocular lens insertion, visual outcomes are similar for femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (LCS) and phacoemulsification cataract surgery (PCS), according to research published online March 6 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

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Spending on Prescription Meds Up About 5 Percent in 2015

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Spending on prescription medications for insured Americans increased about 5 percent in 2015, with the increase half of that seen in 2014, the Associated Press reported.

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Diurnal Variations ID'd in Anterior Sclera, Conjunctiva Thickness

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Diurnal variations occur in the thickness of the anterior sclera and conjunctiva among healthy young adults, according to a study published online March 1 in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics.

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Disruptive Patients Distract Docs, May Receive Compromised Care

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Disruptive patients may get worse care from physicians, according to a study published online March 7 in BMJ Quality & Safety. The findings aren't definitive because the researchers tested how physicians responded in fictional vignettes, instead of real-life encounters. Still, the results suggest that such patients distract physicians from doing their jobs.

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Mayo Clinic Has Established Model to Help Battle Burnout

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an effort to reduce burnout among physicians, the Mayo Clinic is initiating a model to raise camaraderie and increase collaboration, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Guidance Offered for Negotiating Higher Rates From Payers

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Negotiations to increase payment from insurance companies can be extremely difficult, although it is possible to get a payment increase, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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UVA-Riboflavin Cuts Antibiotic-Resistant, Non-Resistant Bacteria

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Riboflavin-ultraviolet A (UVA) collagen crosslinking (CXL) used in photoactivated chromophore for infectious keratitis (PACK) has bactericidal efficacy for both antibiotic resistant and non-resistant bacteria, according to a study published online Feb. 11 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

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E-Consultations Can Improve Access to, Timeliness of Care

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic consultation (e-consultation), an asynchronous, non-face-to-face consultation between a primary care physician and a specialist, can improve access to care and reduce wait times, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Measures of Air Pollution Linked to Dry Eye Disease

FRIDAY, March 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Certain measures of air pollution correlate with dry eye disease (DED), according to a study published online March 10 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Treating Infant Cataracts With Endogenous Stem Cells Feasible

THURSDAY, March 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new surgical technique for removing cataracts might allow the eye's stem cells to regenerate a healthy lens, according to preliminary findings reported online March 9 in Nature.

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Physicians' Contracts Can Affect Patients, Professionalism

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Problematic clauses in physicians' contracts can impact patient care and professionalism, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online March 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Bevacizumab, Triamcinolone Up Outcome After Cataract Surgery

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing cataract surgery, both bevacizumab and triamcinolone administered at the time of surgery correlate with improvements in visual acuity (VA), but only triamcinolone is associated with sustained improvements in central macular thickness (CMT), according to a study published online Feb. 12 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

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Case Report Describes Loss of Vision After Popper Inhalation

TUESDAY, March 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Inhalation of "poppers," a group of alkyl nitrite chemicals, which cause euphoria, sexual arousal, and relaxation of smooth muscles, can cause disruption in vision, according to a case report published online March 7 in BMJ: Case Reports.

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Risk of Chronic Conditions Up for Retinoblastoma Survivors

MONDAY, March 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Retinoblastoma (Rb) survivors have increased risk of chronic conditions, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of Cancer.

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Lens Surface, Care Solution Affect Adhesion of Acanthamoeba

FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Both rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lens surface and multipurpose contact lens care solutions (MPSs) impact adhesion rates of Acanthamoeba castellanii (AC) trophozoites, according to a study published in the March issue of Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics.

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SCOTUS: States Can't Force Health Care Data Release

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Supreme Court has ruled against state efforts to collect health care data from insurance plans.

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Spouse Education Level May Impact Choice for Rural Practice

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who are married to a highly-educated spouse are less likely to work in rural underserved areas, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Anti-VEGF Agents Linked to Visual Acuity Improvement in DME

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetic macular edema (DME), visual acuity (VA) improves over two years with treatment with different anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in Ophthalmology.

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USPSTF: Evidence Lacking for Visual Acuity Screening in Seniors

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has concluded that the evidence is currently inadequate to weigh the benefits and harms of primary care screening for impaired visual acuity in older adults. These findings form the basis of a final recommendation statement, published in the March 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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