March 2016 Briefing - OBGYN & Women's Health

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for March 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Stillbirth Less Likely for Women Receiving Trivalent Flu Vaccine

THURSDAY, March 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women receiving trivalent influenza vaccination are less likely to experience a stillbirth, especially for births occurring just after influenza season, according to a study published online March 30 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Breast Cancer Recurrence Up With Nightly Fasting <13 Hours

THURSDAY, March 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women with breast cancer, fasting less than 13 hours per night is associated with increased risk of recurrence, according to a study published online March 31 in JAMA Oncology.

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Early Menopause Estradiol Tx Cuts Atherosclerosis Advance

THURSDAY, March 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Oral estradiol therapy is associated with less progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women when therapy is initiated early in menopause, according to a study published in the March 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Entry Receptor for Zika Virus Identified in Brain, Retina

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The candidate viral entry receptor for Zika virus, AXL, is highly expressed by cells in the developing human cortex and retina, according to an experimental study published online March 30 in Cell Stem Cell.

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Many Don't Know Key Facts About Zika Virus Transmission

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many individuals are unaware of the exact nature of Zika virus transmission, according to a report published online March 29 by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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>3% of Preterm Births Attributed to Exposure to Particulate Matter

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than 3 percent of preterm births (PTBs) nationally can be attributed to exposure to particulate matter <2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5), according to a study published online March 29 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Endometriosis Tied to Elevated Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Laparoscopically confirmed endometriosis is associated with increased subsequent risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study published online March 29 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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AMA Addresses Elements of Team-Based Care Model

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The elements of a team-based care model are described in a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Tailored Intervention by PCPs Slightly Cuts Depression

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An intervention based on personal predictors of risk for depression implemented by primary care physicians (PCPs) provides a modest reduction in the incidence of major depression compared to usual care, according to a study published online March 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Muscle Training May Help With Mild Pelvic Organ Prolapse

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) results in greater pelvic floor symptom improvement than watchful waiting in women with pelvic organ prolapse, according to a study published online March 21 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Sex Hormones, Inflammation Affect Asthma in Obese Women

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sex hormones and systemic inflammation may be mediating the obese-asthma phenotype, according to a study published online March 23 in Allergy.

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Acupuncture Helps Manage Hot Flashes in Breast Cancer Patients

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture may improve management of hot flashes in women with breast cancer, according to a study published online March 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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CDC: Tips Anti-Smoking Ad Campaign Still Having Impact

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Three years into the campaign, ads targeting smoking are still having a significant impact, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Adherence to Mediterranean Diet May Cut Hip Fracture Risk

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced risk of hip fracture, according to a study published online March 28 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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How Can We Fix the Wage Gap Among Female Physicians?

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women doctors can address the gender wage disparity by understanding the reasons why they earn less, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Standard Precautions Advised in Labor & Delivery to Prevent Zika

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Standard Precautions should be used in all health care settings, including labor and delivery, in order to minimize the potential risk of transmission of Zika virus to health care personnel or other patients, according to research published in the March 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Transcranial Stimulation May Ease Symptoms of Anorexia

FRIDAY, March 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Repetitive transcranial stimulation (rTMS) may ease major symptoms of anorexia nervosa, according to a study published online March 23 in PLOS ONE.

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Many Doctors Prescribe Opioids for Longer Than CDC Advises

FRIDAY, March 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When doctors in the United States prescribe opioids for their patients, 99 percent of them hand out prescriptions that exceed the federally recommended three-day dosage limit, new research suggests.

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FDA Wants Generic Opioids to Be Abuse-Deterrent

FRIDAY, March 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Continuing their push to combat the nation's epidemic of opioid abuse, U.S. officials on Thursday urged generic drug makers to take steps to redesign drugs such as hydrocodone and oxycodone to make them harder to abuse.

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More U.S. Women Opting for Out-of-Hospital Births

THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More women in the United States are choosing to deliver their babies at home or in birth centers, and it seems that appropriate selection of low-risk women is improving, according to research published online March 16 in Birth.

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Genome Sequencing IDs Time of Zika's Arrival in the Americas

THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus likely arrived in the Americas between May and December 2013, more than a year before it was first reported in Brazil, according to a study published online March 24 in Science.

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Maternal Obesity Tied to Increase in Child Behavior Problems

THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal obesity is associated with a small increase in child behavior problems, according to a study published online March 21 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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SSRIs Do Not Appear to Increase Cardiovascular Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) don't appear to raise cardiovascular risk among young and middle-age patients, according to research published online March 22 in The BMJ.

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ASCO Endorses Cancer Care Ontario Breast Cancer Guidelines

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has endorsed the Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) recommendations on the role of patient and disease factors in selecting adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer, according to a special article published online March 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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FDA Orders Enhanced Warning Labels on Opioid Pain Medications

TUESDAY, March 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced that immediate-release opioid pain medications will get new boxed warnings about the dangers of misuse.

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AMA Encouraging Physicians to ID, Assist Victims of Trafficking

TUESDAY, March 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians can help to identify and assist trafficking victims, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Low Likelihood for Atypia, DCIS Verification With Single Slide

TUESDAY, March 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Interpretation of a single breast biopsy slide per case predicts low likelihood of verification for diagnosis of atypia or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), according to a study published online March 22 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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FDA: Most Powdered Medical Gloves Should Be Banned in U.S.

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants to ban most powdered medical gloves, saying they pose serious health risks to patients and health care providers alike.

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Poor Prognosis for Women With Pregnancy-Associated Melanoma

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women aged younger than 50 years, melanoma prognosis is worse for those aged 40 to 49 years and for those diagnosed with a pregnancy-associated melanoma, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Physicians Respond to New CDC Opioid Guidelines

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have responded to the new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's clinical guidelines for prescribing opioids, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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CDC: 116 Travel-Associated Zika Cases in U.S. So Far This Year

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- During the first two months of this year, 116 U.S. residents have tested positive for infection with the Zika virus, and all but one were linked to travel to regions endemic for the virus. The findings were reported in the March 18 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Duration of Estrogen Deficiency Linked to Fibrosis Risk in NAFLD

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For postmenopausal women with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), longer duration of estrogen deficiency is associated with increased odds of having more severe fibrosis, according to a study published online Feb. 26 in Hepatology.

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Case Before Supreme Court May Expose Doctors to Large Fines

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A case before a state supreme court could potentially expose physicians to large fines based on a legal technicality relating to what they should have known, rather than what they knew, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Predictions Made for Zika Arrival in U.S. Cities This Summer

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some major U.S. cities, including New York City and Los Angeles, could face outbreaks of the Zika virus this summer, according to a report published online March 16 in PLOS Currents: Outbreaks.

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Diabetes Management Program Doesn't Cut Disparities in Care

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A telephone-based disease management program delivered by a disease management vendor is ineffective in reducing racial/ethnic disparities in diabetes care, according to a study published online March 10 in Diabetes Care.

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Spending on Prescription Meds Up About 5 Percent in 2015

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Spending on prescription medications for insured Americans increased about 5 percent in 2015, with the increase half of that seen in 2014, the Associated Press reported.

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CDC: Obesity Contributing to Hike in Asthma Rates Among Women

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As weight rises, so too does the risk for asthma, according to a March data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Patient-Controlled Analgesia Non-Inferior After C-Section

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early patient-controlled oral analgesia is non-inferior to standard parenteral analgesia for pain management after elective cesarean section, according to a study published online March 2 in Anaesthesia.

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FDA Safety Announcement Affected Bisphosphonate Use

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. Food and Drug Administration safety announcement relating to atrial fibrillation risk associated with bisphosphonates correlated with a reduction in bisphosphonate use, according to a study published online March 11 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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Antenatal Corticosteroids Cut Mortality for Early Preemies

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For neonates born before 24 weeks of gestation, receipt of antenatal corticosteroids and active intensive treatment is associated with reduced odds of mortality to discharge, according to a review published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Disruptive Patients Distract Docs, May Receive Compromised Care

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Disruptive patients may get worse care from physicians, according to a study published online March 7 in BMJ Quality & Safety. The findings aren't definitive because the researchers tested how physicians responded in fictional vignettes, instead of real-life encounters. Still, the results suggest that such patients distract physicians from doing their jobs.

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HIV-Seropositive CIN3+ Patients Have Lower HPV16 Prevalence

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-seropositive women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade ≥3 (CIN3+) are less likely to have human papillomavirus (HPV) 16, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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CDC Issues New Prescription Guidelines for Opioids

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new advisory, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, stresses that doctors -- especially primary care physicians -- should try to avoid prescription of opioids whenever possible. Two research letters published online March 15 in the Journal of the American Medical Association highlight the scope of the opioid issue.

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Mayo Clinic Has Established Model to Help Battle Burnout

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an effort to reduce burnout among physicians, the Mayo Clinic is initiating a model to raise camaraderie and increase collaboration, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Girls Using IUDs Rather Than OCPs Less Likely to Use Condoms

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- High school girls who use long-acting contraception -- such as intrauterine devices or implants -- are less likely to focus on condom use than girls who are taking oral contraceptives, according to a study published online March 14 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Off-Label Use of Metformin Common in U.S. Adolescents

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In U.S. adolescents, off-label use of metformin is common, according to a study published online March 9 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Abruptly Quitting Appears to Work Best for Smoking Cessation

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Quitting cigarettes "cold turkey" beats a more gradual approach, according to research published online March 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Familial Hypercholesterolemia More Common Than Thought

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Familial hypercholesterolemia affects about one in every 250 American men and women and significantly increases their risk for an early heart attack, according to a study published in the March 15 issue of Circulation.

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Cerebral Venous Thrombosis Risk Up in Obese Women on OCPs

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women taking oral contraceptives may be nearly 30 times more likely to develop cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), compared with women of normal weight who don't take birth control pills, according to a study published online March 14 in JAMA Neurology.

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Guidance Offered for Negotiating Higher Rates From Payers

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Negotiations to increase payment from insurance companies can be extremely difficult, although it is possible to get a payment increase, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Preventive Mastectomies Triple for U.S. Women Over Past Decade

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The number of U.S. breast cancer patients choosing to have a healthy breast removed has tripled in the past decade, even though this aggressive measure offers no significant survival benefits for women with cancer in one breast, according to a study published online March 8 in the Annals of Surgery.

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Antihyperglycemic Medication Prescribing Trends Are Changing

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Trends indicate a reduction in glyburide and thiazolidinedione prescriptions and increases in gliclazide and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor prescriptions among older adults with diabetes and chronic kidney disease, according to a study published online March 4 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Early-Term Delivery May Not Up Adverse Neonatal Outcomes

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Elective early-term deliveries may not be associated with increased risk of adverse neonatal outcomes, according to a study published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Few Care Management Processes Used for Depression

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. primary care practices use less than one care management process for depression, on average, according to a study published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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E-Consultations Can Improve Access to, Timeliness of Care

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic consultation (e-consultation), an asynchronous, non-face-to-face consultation between a primary care physician and a specialist, can improve access to care and reduce wait times, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Five Strategies Employed to Help Promote Behavior Change

FRIDAY, March 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Five key strategies are employed by clinicians to help promote patient behavior change, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Triple-Handed Approach Eases Palpation of Ticklish Patients

FRIDAY, March 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A novel triple-handed approach allows for examination of lymph-node basins without eliciting a ticklish response, according to a letter to the editor published in the March 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CYP3A7*1C Allele Linked to Cancer Mortality, Progression

FRIDAY, March 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The CYP3A7*1C allele appears to be associated with mortality and disease progression in specific cancers, according to a study published online March 10 in Cancer Research.

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CDC: Zika Poses Serious Threat to Puerto Rico

THURSDAY, March 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials issued an assessment Thursday of the continued spread of the Zika virus, which is already suspected of causing thousands of birth defects in Brazil and has made inroads into Puerto Rico.

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Zika Now Tied to Meningoencephalitis

THURSDAY, March 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The list of neurological disorders potentially associated with the Zika virus continues to grow, according to a letter to the editor and a perspective piece published online March 9 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Combo Tx Protects Pregnant Women, Fetuses From Malaria

THURSDAY, March 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A combination drug therapy widely used to treat malaria in adults -- dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) -- also protects pregnant women and their fetuses from the disease, according to research published in the March 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Too Few Patients With Prediabetes Are Being Treated

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A large number of Americans with prediabetes aren't being treated for the condition, which suggests that doctors are missing opportunities to prevent diabetes, according to research published in the March-April issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine.

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Complications Led to Loss of Organ in U.S. Uterus Transplant

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first U.S. woman to receive a transplanted uterus has had the implanted organ removed due to an unnamed sudden complication, her doctors at the Cleveland Clinic announced Wednesday.

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CDC: U.S. Cancer Mortality Rate Continues to Fall

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Overall rates of cancer and cancer mortality in the United States continue to decline, according to the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, a yearly report issued by the American Cancer Society, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Cancer Institute, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. The report was published online March 9 in Cancer.

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Physicians' Contracts Can Affect Patients, Professionalism

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Problematic clauses in physicians' contracts can impact patient care and professionalism, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online March 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Review IDs Care Gaps for Teens With Chronic Conditions

TUESDAY, March 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patient-related determinants of care gaps have been identified in adolescents with chronic conditions; the findings were published online March 3 in Pediatrics.

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Opportunities for Healthy Diet, Exercise Influence Behaviors

TUESDAY, March 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Practical opportunities for healthy diet and activity are associated with intentions, achieved behaviors, and body mass index (BMI), according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Maternal Vitamin D Deficiency May Up MS Risk in Offspring

TUESDAY, March 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency in early pregnancy is associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) in offspring, according to a study published online March 7 in JAMA Neurology.

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High Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio Prognostic in Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, March 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Presurgery high neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a prognostic variable of worse outcome in Caucasian patients with early breast cancer, according to a study published online March 7 in ESMO Open: Cancer Horizons.

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Chemical Exposure Down With Switch in Cosmetics Among Teens

MONDAY, March 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Switching to chemical-free cosmetics and shampoos quickly lowers levels of hormone-disrupting chemicals in the bodies of adolescent girls, according to a study published online March 7 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Surgeons Offer Details on First U.S. Uterus Transplant

MONDAY, March 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first American woman to receive a uterus transplant, a 26-year-old identified only as Lindsey, is doing well, Cleveland Clinic doctors reported during a Tuesday news conference.

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Chorioamnionitis Not Linked to Lower Bayley II Scores at Age 2

MONDAY, March 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Chorioamnionitis does not appear to be associated with decreased Bayley II scores at age 2 years, according to a study published in the March issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Scientists Report Insights Into Zika Virus and Microcephaly

FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Laboratory studies have shown that Zika can infect a type of neural stem cell that gives rise to the cerebral cortex of the brain, according to research published online March 4 in Cell Stem Cell.

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Daily Low-Dose Aspirin May Reduce Risk of Some Cancers

FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Taking low-dose aspirin every day may lower the overall risk of cancer by 3 percent, mostly due to larger reductions seen in risk for colon and gastrointestinal tumors, according to research published online March 3 in JAMA Oncology.

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More Chest Pain for Women Undergoing PCI With DES

FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with new generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have a higher prevalence of clinically relevant chest pain, according to a study published online March 2 in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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ACOG Issues Recommendations on Prenatal Screening

FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations on screening for genetic disorders and fetal aneuploidy have been updated, according to two Practice Bulletins published online March 3 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Annual Visit Rate for Obesity Is 49 Visits Per 1,000 Persons

THURSDAY, March 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In 2012 there were 11 million visits to health care providers for obesity, with variation in visit rates by age and sex, according to a March data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Google Pledges $1 Million to Help Fight Zika Virus

THURSDAY, March 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A $1 million donation to fight the spread of the Zika virus and an offer to help analyze data to predict the spread of the mosquito-borne disease was announced by Google.

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Ovarian CA Encompasses More Than One Kind of Malignancy

THURSDAY, March 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Ovarian cancer isn't a single disease, but rather a number of different malignancies involving the ovaries, an expert U.S. panel says.

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SCOTUS: States Can't Force Health Care Data Release

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Supreme Court has ruled against state efforts to collect health care data from insurance plans.

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Decrease in Rate of Unintended Pregnancies From 2008 to 2011

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of unintended pregnancies in the United States decreased from 2008 to 2011, according to research published in the March 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Induction of Labor Seems Safe for Women of Advanced Maternal Age

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For older women, induction of labor at 39 weeks of gestation has no effect on cesarean section delivery or adverse outcomes compared with expectant management, according to a study published in the March 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Iron Supplement in Infancy May Benefit Motor Development

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Iron supplementation in infancy, regardless of iron supplementation in pregnancy, improves gross motor development at age 9 months, according to research published online March 2 in Pediatrics.

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Type 1 Diabetes Linked to Increased Risk of Certain Cancers

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with type 1 diabetes appear to have a higher risk for cancers of the stomach, liver, pancreas, endometrium, ovary, and kidneys, but a reduced risk for prostate and breast cancers, according to research published online Feb. 29 in Diabetologia.

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Spouse Education Level May Impact Choice for Rural Practice

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who are married to a highly-educated spouse are less likely to work in rural underserved areas, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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USPSTF: Evidence Lacking for Visual Acuity Screening in Seniors

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has concluded that the evidence is currently inadequate to weigh the benefits and harms of primary care screening for impaired visual acuity in older adults. These findings form the basis of a final recommendation statement, published in the March 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Many Do Not Share Personal Genetic Testing Results With PCP

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many individuals who undergo direct-to-consumer (DTC) personal genomic testing (PGT) do not share the results with their primary care provider (PCP), according to research published online March 1 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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