March 2016 Briefing - Neurology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for March 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Neuronal Heparan Sulfates Play Role in Amyloid Pathology

THURSDAY, March 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Neuronal heparan sulfates (HSs) modulate brain amyloid-β (Aβ) clearance and aggregation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to an experimental study published in the March 30 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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No Benefit for Longer-Term Antibiotic Tx in Lyme Disease

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Longer-term antibiotic treatment does not improve health-related quality of life compared with shorter-term treatment among patients with persistent symptoms attributed to Lyme disease, according to a study published in the March 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Entry Receptor for Zika Virus Identified in Brain, Retina

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The candidate viral entry receptor for Zika virus, AXL, is highly expressed by cells in the developing human cortex and retina, according to an experimental study published online March 30 in Cell Stem Cell.

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Many Don't Know Key Facts About Zika Virus Transmission

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many individuals are unaware of the exact nature of Zika virus transmission, according to a report published online March 29 by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity Slowed in Segmental Vitiligo

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Segmental vitiligo (SV) compromises motor nerves in the lesional limbs, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in the International Journal of Dermatology.

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Antipsychotics Not Effective for Delirium in Hospitalized Patients

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antipsychotic medications do not appear to be effective for preventing or treating delirium in adult medical or surgical inpatients, according to a review published online March 23 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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AMA Addresses Elements of Team-Based Care Model

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The elements of a team-based care model are described in a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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How Can We Fix the Wage Gap Among Female Physicians?

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women doctors can address the gender wage disparity by understanding the reasons why they earn less, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Standard Precautions Advised in Labor & Delivery to Prevent Zika

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Standard Precautions should be used in all health care settings, including labor and delivery, in order to minimize the potential risk of transmission of Zika virus to health care personnel or other patients, according to research published in the March 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Transcranial Stimulation May Ease Symptoms of Anorexia

FRIDAY, March 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Repetitive transcranial stimulation (rTMS) may ease major symptoms of anorexia nervosa, according to a study published online March 23 in PLOS ONE.

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Genome Sequencing IDs Time of Zika's Arrival in the Americas

THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus likely arrived in the Americas between May and December 2013, more than a year before it was first reported in Brazil, according to a study published online March 24 in Science.

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Antipsychotics May Up Early Mortality Risk in Parkinson's

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Parkinson's disease patients who are given antipsychotics to treat dementia and psychosis may be more likely to die early, according to research published online March 21 in JAMA Neurology.

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FDA: Most Powdered Medical Gloves Should Be Banned in U.S.

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants to ban most powdered medical gloves, saying they pose serious health risks to patients and health care providers alike.

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Risk of Parkinson's Disease Increased for Rosacea Patients

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Rosacea is associated with an increased risk for Parkinson's disease, according to research published online March 21 in JAMA Neurology.

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CDC: 116 Travel-Associated Zika Cases in U.S. So Far This Year

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- During the first two months of this year, 116 U.S. residents have tested positive for infection with the Zika virus, and all but one were linked to travel to regions endemic for the virus. The findings were reported in the March 18 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Cognitive Impairment Affects Speech of Parkinson's Patients

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Declines in cognition could have a greater impact on the ability of Parkinson's disease patients to converse than physical impairment, according to research published online March 16 in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease.

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Bevacizumab Use in Preemies Associated With Disabilities

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Bevacizumab (Avastin) used to treat retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) may be linked to serious disabilities such as cerebral palsy and hearing loss, according to a study published online March 17 in Pediatrics.

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Case Before Supreme Court May Expose Doctors to Large Fines

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A case before a state supreme court could potentially expose physicians to large fines based on a legal technicality relating to what they should have known, rather than what they knew, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Predictions Made for Zika Arrival in U.S. Cities This Summer

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some major U.S. cities, including New York City and Los Angeles, could face outbreaks of the Zika virus this summer, according to a report published online March 16 in PLOS Currents: Outbreaks.

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Spending on Prescription Meds Up About 5 Percent in 2015

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Spending on prescription medications for insured Americans increased about 5 percent in 2015, with the increase half of that seen in 2014, the Associated Press reported.

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Many A-Fib Patients Missing Out on Recommended Anticoagulation

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than half of atrial fibrillation patients at highest risk for stroke are prescribed recommended anticoagulation, according to research published online March 16 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Distal Symmetric Polyneuropathy Linked to MetS Components

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) prevalence increases with an increasing number of components of metabolic syndrome, according to a study published online March 10 in Diabetes Care.

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Disruptive Patients Distract Docs, May Receive Compromised Care

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Disruptive patients may get worse care from physicians, according to a study published online March 7 in BMJ Quality & Safety. The findings aren't definitive because the researchers tested how physicians responded in fictional vignettes, instead of real-life encounters. Still, the results suggest that such patients distract physicians from doing their jobs.

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Inhaled Xenon May Cut White Matter Damage in Cardiac Arrest

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, inhaled xenon combined with hypothermia is associated with less white matter damage, as measured by fractional anisotropy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), according to a study published in the March 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Mayo Clinic Has Established Model to Help Battle Burnout

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an effort to reduce burnout among physicians, the Mayo Clinic is initiating a model to raise camaraderie and increase collaboration, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Familial Hypercholesterolemia More Common Than Thought

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Familial hypercholesterolemia affects about one in every 250 American men and women and significantly increases their risk for an early heart attack, according to a study published in the March 15 issue of Circulation.

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Cerebral Venous Thrombosis Risk Up in Obese Women on OCPs

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women taking oral contraceptives may be nearly 30 times more likely to develop cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), compared with women of normal weight who don't take birth control pills, according to a study published online March 14 in JAMA Neurology.

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Guidance Offered for Negotiating Higher Rates From Payers

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Negotiations to increase payment from insurance companies can be extremely difficult, although it is possible to get a payment increase, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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E-Consultations Can Improve Access to, Timeliness of Care

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic consultation (e-consultation), an asynchronous, non-face-to-face consultation between a primary care physician and a specialist, can improve access to care and reduce wait times, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Apnea Impacts Neurocognitive Function in Children

FRIDAY, March 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has a deleterious impact in children, affecting neurocognitive functioning, according to a study published online March 1 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Evidence Links Agent Orange to Bladder Cancer, Hypothyroidism

FRIDAY, March 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is stronger evidence of a link between the herbicide Agent Orange and bladder cancer and hypothyroidism among U.S. military personnel exposed to the chemical during the Vietnam War, a new Institute of Medicine report shows.

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CDC: Zika Poses Serious Threat to Puerto Rico

THURSDAY, March 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials issued an assessment Thursday of the continued spread of the Zika virus, which is already suspected of causing thousands of birth defects in Brazil and has made inroads into Puerto Rico.

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Zika Now Tied to Meningoencephalitis

THURSDAY, March 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The list of neurological disorders potentially associated with the Zika virus continues to grow, according to a letter to the editor and a perspective piece published online March 9 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Warfarin's Intracranial Bleed Risk Higher Than Previously Reported

THURSDAY, March 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Warfarin treatment for patients with atrial fibrillation may raise the risk of traumatic intracranial bleeding by more than previously reported, according to a study published online March 9 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Physicians' Contracts Can Affect Patients, Professionalism

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Problematic clauses in physicians' contracts can impact patient care and professionalism, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online March 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Video Game-Based Cognitive Rehab Program Beneficial in MS

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A video game-based cognitive rehabilitation program is associated with changes in thalamocortical functional connectivity (FC) among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study published online March 8 in Radiology.

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Experimental Study Supports Health Effects of 'Bromances'

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate stress encourages male bonding, and prosocial behavior improves stress resiliency, according to an experimental study in rats published online Feb. 2 in Neuropsychopharmacology.

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Maternal Vitamin D Deficiency May Up MS Risk in Offspring

TUESDAY, March 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency in early pregnancy is associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) in offspring, according to a study published online March 7 in JAMA Neurology.

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Chorioamnionitis Not Linked to Lower Bayley II Scores at Age 2

MONDAY, March 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Chorioamnionitis does not appear to be associated with decreased Bayley II scores at age 2 years, according to a study published in the March issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Heavy Coffee Consumption May Lower Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who consume about six cups of coffee a day are almost one-third less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) than non-drinkers, according to research published online March 3 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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Google Pledges $1 Million to Help Fight Zika Virus

THURSDAY, March 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A $1 million donation to fight the spread of the Zika virus and an offer to help analyze data to predict the spread of the mosquito-borne disease was announced by Google.

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Recurrence Risk Estimator Valid for Acute Ischemic Stroke

THURSDAY, March 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Recurrence Risk Estimator (RRE) score is valid for identifying the risk of recurrence in patients with acute ischemic stroke, according to a study published online Feb. 29 in JAMA Neurology.

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SCOTUS: States Can't Force Health Care Data Release

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Supreme Court has ruled against state efforts to collect health care data from insurance plans.

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Iron Supplement in Infancy May Benefit Motor Development

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Iron supplementation in infancy, regardless of iron supplementation in pregnancy, improves gross motor development at age 9 months, according to research published online March 2 in Pediatrics.

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Spouse Education Level May Impact Choice for Rural Practice

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who are married to a highly-educated spouse are less likely to work in rural underserved areas, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Pre-Visit Questionnaire Can Help ID Common Vestibular Diagnoses

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a vestibular intake questionnaire can predict common vestibular diagnoses, prior to clinical assessment, according to research published online Feb. 25 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

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Metabolic Syndrome Tied to Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and MCI progression to dementia is increased in association with metabolic syndrome (MetS), according to a study published online Feb. 29 in JAMA Neurology.

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Dementia Incidence Higher Than CHD in Very Elderly

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For adults aged 80 years or older, the incidence of dementia is greater than that of coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study published in the March 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Zika Infection Linked to Guillain-Barré Syndrome

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Zika virus infection may be associated with incidence of Guillain-Barré syndrome, according to a study published online Feb. 29 in The Lancet.

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AAN: Stroke Risk Up With Daylight Saving Transitions

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The transition to daylight saving time (DST) is associated with a transient increase in the risk of ischemic stroke, according to a study scheduled for presentation at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, to be held from April 15 to 21 in Vancouver, Canada.

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