March 2016 Briefing - Nephrology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nephrology for March 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Johns Hopkins Announces HIV-to-HIV Organ Transplants

THURSDAY, March 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Groundbreaking liver and kidney transplants from an HIV-positive donor to HIV-positive recipients were announced Wednesday by surgeons at Johns Hopkins University.

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AMA Addresses Elements of Team-Based Care Model

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The elements of a team-based care model are described in a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Intensive Glucose Control Offers Lasting Reduction in Risk of ESKD

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, intensive glucose control has long-term benefits for preventing end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), according to a study published online March 22 in Diabetes Care.

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How Can We Fix the Wage Gap Among Female Physicians?

MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women doctors can address the gender wage disparity by understanding the reasons why they earn less, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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ASCO Endorses European Guideline on Bladder Cancer

THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has endorsed the European Association of Urology (EAU) guideline on muscle-invasive (MIBC) and metastatic bladder cancer, according to a special article published online March 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Financial Compensation May Encourage Kidney Donation

THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- If offered $50,000, nearly three out of five Americans would donate a kidney, according to survey results published online March 23 in JAMA Surgery.

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FDA: Most Powdered Medical Gloves Should Be Banned in U.S.

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants to ban most powdered medical gloves, saying they pose serious health risks to patients and health care providers alike.

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Case Before Supreme Court May Expose Doctors to Large Fines

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A case before a state supreme court could potentially expose physicians to large fines based on a legal technicality relating to what they should have known, rather than what they knew, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Case Report: Ceftriaxone-Linked Renal Toxicity in Adult Male

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A case of ceftriaxone-associated renal toxicity in an adult has been documented in a case report published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Dialysis of Little Benefit to Elderly End-Stage Renal Disease Patients

FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dialysis does not significantly improve survival for elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), according to research published online March 17 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Spending on Prescription Meds Up About 5 Percent in 2015

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Spending on prescription medications for insured Americans increased about 5 percent in 2015, with the increase half of that seen in 2014, the Associated Press reported.

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Antibiotic Resistance in Pediatric UTIs Up Globally

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many children who develop urinary tract infections (UTIs) tied to the Escherichia coli bacteria are now failing to respond to antibiotic treatment, according to research published online March 15 in The BMJ.

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Disruptive Patients Distract Docs, May Receive Compromised Care

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Disruptive patients may get worse care from physicians, according to a study published online March 7 in BMJ Quality & Safety. The findings aren't definitive because the researchers tested how physicians responded in fictional vignettes, instead of real-life encounters. Still, the results suggest that such patients distract physicians from doing their jobs.

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Mayo Clinic Has Established Model to Help Battle Burnout

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an effort to reduce burnout among physicians, the Mayo Clinic is initiating a model to raise camaraderie and increase collaboration, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Recommendations Issued for Myeloma-Tied Renal Impairment

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations have been developed for the diagnosis and management of multiple myeloma-related renal impairment; the guidelines were published online March 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Guidance Offered for Negotiating Higher Rates From Payers

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Negotiations to increase payment from insurance companies can be extremely difficult, although it is possible to get a payment increase, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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E-Consultations Can Improve Access to, Timeliness of Care

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic consultation (e-consultation), an asynchronous, non-face-to-face consultation between a primary care physician and a specialist, can improve access to care and reduce wait times, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Antihyperglycemic Medication Prescribing Trends Are Changing

MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Trends indicate a reduction in glyburide and thiazolidinedione prescriptions and increases in gliclazide and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor prescriptions among older adults with diabetes and chronic kidney disease, according to a study published online March 4 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Survival Benefit for Kidneys From Incompatible Living Donors

THURSDAY, March 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In what researchers are calling a possible "paradigm shift," a new study shows kidney disease patients may live longer if they receive a transplant from an incompatible living donor rather than wait for a good match. The research was published in the March 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Physicians' Contracts Can Affect Patients, Professionalism

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Problematic clauses in physicians' contracts can impact patient care and professionalism, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online March 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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SCOTUS: States Can't Force Health Care Data Release

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Supreme Court has ruled against state efforts to collect health care data from insurance plans.

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Case of Hepatitis E Transmission Via Plasma Exchange

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A case of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been reported in a kidney transplant recipient, according to a research letter published online March 1 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Spouse Education Level May Impact Choice for Rural Practice

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who are married to a highly-educated spouse are less likely to work in rural underserved areas, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Uric Acid Levels Low in Teens With Type 1 Diabetes

TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Plasma uric acid (PUA) levels are significantly lower in adolescent patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) than in healthy control subjects, and there does not appear to be a link between PUA levels and cardiorenal abnormalities in these patients, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in Diabetes Care.

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