March 2015 Briefing - OBGYN & Women's Health

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for March 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Mobile Health App Use Continuing to Increase

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of mobile health apps is continuing to increase and doctors are embracing this trend, with more than one-third of physicians recommending their use in the past year, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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USPSTF: Evidence Lacking for Routine Iron Supplementation

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Taking iron supplements during pregnancy doesn't appear to significantly change any health outcomes for mother or infant, a new review shows. A second review -- this one on infants and toddlers -- found no evidence that iron supplements improved growth or development. The findings on pregnant women were released online March 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The findings on children were published online March 30 in Pediatrics.

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New Breast CA Subtype Data Could Improve Risk Stratification

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Classifying breast cancers according to tumor subtypes could help improve treatment of the disease, according to a new statement from four major medical groups focused on the disease. The report was published online March 30 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Small, Steady Decline in Cancer Rates in U.S. Over Past Decade

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- America is making slow but steady progress against cancer, with a continuing decline in cancer deaths, according to a new report published online March 30 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The report was coauthored by experts from the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, the American Cancer Society, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

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Exogenous Progesterone Increases Nuchal Translucency

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exogenous progesterone seems to increase nuchal translucency (NT), according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Glyburide in Gestational DM Linked to Complications

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When used to treat gestational diabetes, glyburide has been linked to a number of complications in the infant, according to a new study. The report was published online March 30 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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2015 Match Sees High Proportion of Unmatched Seniors

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 6.1 percent of U.S. allopathic medical school seniors in the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) were not placed into first-year residency positions, with a higher percentage of unmatched seniors than in 2014, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Diabetes May Predispose to More Advanced Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with diabetes may have an increased risk of being diagnosed with advanced breast cancer, according to a new study published online March 17 in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment.

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Laparoscopic Tops Abdominal Hysterectomy for Fibroid Tumors

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Laparoscopic hysterectomy with morcellation is associated with better outcomes than abdominal hysterectomy for women with presumed fibroid tumors, according to research published online March 24 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Fish, ω-3 PUFAs Linked to Survival After Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High intake of fish and long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is associated with reduced all-cause mortality after breast cancer, according to a study published online March 24 in Cancer.

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Intraperitoneal Chemo Offers Lasting Benefit in Ovarian Cancer

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy offers lasting benefit for patients with advanced ovarian cancer, according to a study published online March 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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AAFP Issues Comprehensive Breastfeeding Toolkit

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new breastfeeding toolkit is available, which includes the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) business case for why employers should support breastfeeding, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

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Prenatal Exposure to Pollutants May Affect Fetal Brain

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to common air pollutants before birth may make children more likely to have the symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other thinking and behavioral problems, a small new study suggests. The findings were published online March 25 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Physicians Should Be Aware of Signs of Burnout

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Burnout can be prevented if physicians are aware of the warning signs, according to an article published by the American Medical Association.

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Rotational Instrument Delivery OK for Fetal Malposition

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal outcomes are no worse with rotational instrumental delivery than with cesarean delivery for persistent fetal malposition, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Lasting Benefit for Stress Mgmt Post Breast Cancer Surgery

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women with early-stage breast cancer, cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) delivered after surgery is associated with long-term psychological benefits, according to a study published online March 23 in Cancer.

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Hormone Therapy Not Detrimental to Women on Statins

MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hormone therapy is associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality in women treated with statins, according to a study published in the April issue of Menopause.

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Shoulder Dystocia Maneuvers Not Tied to Neonatal Harm

MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A variety of shoulder dystocia maneuvers are not associated with neonatal morbidity after adjusting for duration, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Electronic Solutions Underway for Rx Prior Authorizations

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts are underway to offer technological solutions to the burdens associated with prior authorizations, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Gaining Just 5 Kilograms Greatly Ups T2DM Risk After GDM

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), baseline and most recent body mass index (BMI) and weight gain after GDM correlate with increased long-term risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online March 18 in Diabetologia.

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Sleep Affects Women's Sexual Desire, Response

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sufficient sleep is important to the promotion of healthy sexual desire and response in females, according to a study published online March 16 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Assisted Reproductive Technology Linked to Autism

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Assisted reproductive technology (ART) is associated with increased incidence of autism, according to a study published online March 19 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Minority Women Less Involved in Choices for Breast CA Surgery

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Minority patients are less actively involved in surgeon and hospital selection for breast cancer surgery, according to a study published online March 19 in JAMA Oncology.

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Breastfeeding Linked to Improved IQ at Age 30

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding is associated with improved performance in intelligence tests at age 30, according to a study from Brazil published in the April issue of The Lancet Global Health.

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Accuracy High for Pathologists Interpreting Breast Biopsy

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Individual pathologists' interpretations of a single breast biopsy slide generally concur with expert consensus-derived reference diagnoses, according to a study published in the March 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cancer Odds Up 40 Percent in Obese Women

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity takes a huge toll on health, and a new British study finds that obese women have a 40 percent higher risk for cancer than thinner women.

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More Than 16 Million Americans Have Gained Coverage Under ACA

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Obama Administration reported Monday the largest drop in the number of Americans without health insurance since the Johnson administration expanded health coverage through Medicare and Medicaid 50 years ago.

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Gender-Specific Variation in Medical Specialties

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical specialties vary by gender, with obstetrics/gynecology and pediatrics dominated by female residents and specialties such as surgery, emergency medicine, and anesthesiology dominated by males, according to a report published by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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HCPs Lack Knowledge and Awareness of Sex Trafficking

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health care providers demonstrate significant knowledge gaps regarding sex trafficking (ST), according to research published online March 16 in Pediatrics.

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Any Kidney Disease to Be Seen As Relevant in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic kidney disease (CKD) during pregnancy puts women and their babies at risk for certain types of problems, even if the disease is at an early stage and the mother-to-be has normal kidney function, according to a study published online March 12 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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HHS Wants to Help Restore Joy of Medicine

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is listening to physicians and wants to address the regulatory burdens they face, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Researchers Estimate Physician Shortage for 2035

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Based on current demographics and utilization of primary care services, more than 44,000 primary care physicians will be needed by 2035, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Where You Live May Impact Use of Unnecessary Imaging

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with low-risk prostate or breast cancer may have higher or lower odds of getting an unnecessary imaging based on geography, according to a new study published online March 12 in JAMA Oncology.

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Getting Heard May Be Key to Getting New Job

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Your voice may be the key to landing a new job, researchers report in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science.

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Poll: Majority of Americans Interested in Genetic Testing

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of Americans taking part in a new poll said they'd be interested in genetic testing to see if they or their children are at risk for serious illnesses. The findings were published online March 6 in Public Health Genomics.

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No Higher Odds of Breast Cancer in Transgender Patients

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While concerns remain regarding the long-term health effects of hormonal therapy on transgender patients, new research indicates that there is no higher risk of breast cancer in this group than in the general population.

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More Support for 'Timing Hypothesis' in HRT Use

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There's yet another study looking at the potential dangers of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for menopausal symptoms, and this one supports the notion that the treatment may not help women's hearts. The findings were published online March 10 in The Cochrane Library.

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Clinical Trial Data Often Not Reported in Timely Manner

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers are not promptly reporting the results of clinical trials to ClinicalTrials.gov, according to an article published in the March 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Physicians Should Plan Exit Strategy in Advance

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should begin planning their exit strategy three to five years in advance, according to the American Medical Association.

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Psychosocial Phone Counseling Aids Cervical Cancer Survivors

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A psychosocial telephone counseling (PTC) intervention can be beneficial for cervical cancer survivors, according to a study published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Persistent EHR Nonadoption Could Mean Lower Payment

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Persistent nonadopters of electronic health records (EHRs) tend to be older, and are employed in smaller practices, according to a letter published in the March 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Frustrated by Regulations, Doctors Increasingly Miserable

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The nationwide Physician Misery Index is 3.7 out of 5, with the vast majority of physicians reporting that the business and regulation of health care has worsened the practice of medicine, according to a report published by Geneia.

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HSV-2 Vaccine Shows Promise in Experimental Research

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study in mice hints at the success of a vaccine against the herpes simplex virus. The research was published online March 9 in eLife.

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AAMC: Significant Shortfall of Physicians Projected for 2025

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The expected shortfall of physicians is projected to reach about 46,000 to 90,000 by 2025, according to a study conducted by IHS Inc. for the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Beats Prone Stereotactic VAB

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) is superior to that of prone stereotactic (PS) VAB, according to a study published in the March issue of Radiology.

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Labiaplasty Considered Safe, With High Patient Satisfaction

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Labiaplasty is safe, with high satisfaction, although current practices are diverse, according to a review published in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Family Hx of Prostate CA May Increase Risk of Breast CA Too

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A family history of prostate cancer may be tied to a woman's risk of breast cancer, according to a new study published online March 9 in Cancer.

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Physical Labor, High BP, Multiple Meds Affect Male Fertility

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hard physical work, high blood pressure, and taking multiple medications are among the factors that may lower sperm quality and make men less fertile, new research finds. The study was published online March 9 in Fertility and Sterility.

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Paternal, Maternal Depression May Up Asthma Risk for Baby

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A child may face an increased risk of asthma if the child's mother or father experienced depression during the pregnancy or if the mother took an older antidepressant to treat her condition, new research suggests. The study findings were published online March 9 in Pediatrics.

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Changes Being Made to Med School Applicant Assessment

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In accordance with the changes in graduate medical education to better prepare doctors for a changing health care system, changes are being made to medical school applicant evaluation, according to an article published Feb. 19 by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Confidence Gap Between Male and Female Med Students

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Female medical students perform at the same or higher level as men, but they lack confidence compared with men, according to a letter published in the March 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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National Hospital Rating Systems Rarely in Agreement

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- National hospital rating systems are rarely in agreement, according to a study published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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FDA Launches First App to Identify Drug Shortages

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A mobile phone application (app) has been released to identify current drug shortages, resolved shortages, or discontinuations of drug products, according to a press release published by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Goserelin Protects Against Ovarian Failure in Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with breast cancer, use of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, goserelin, protects against ovarian failure, according to a study published in the March 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Six Months of Valganciclovir in CMV Provides Long-Term Benefit

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For neonates with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV), six months of valganciclovir does not improve hearing in the short term, but is associated with improved outcomes in the long term, according to a study published in the March 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Correlated Spectroscopy IDs Changes in BRCA1/2 Carriers

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of localized correlated spectroscopy (COSY) shows significant changes in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, according to a study published online March 3 in Radiology.

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Rush University Adds Patient Scores to Doctor Profiles

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Rush University Medical Center's website has started adding the results of patient surveys to individual physician profiles, according to a report published by the medical center.

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Many PCPs Not Using Rx Drug Monitoring Programs Routinely

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most primary care physicians are aware of state prescription drug monitoring programs, and more than half report using one, according to research published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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Sedative Pre-Anesthesia Doesn't Increase Patient Satisfaction

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study questions the need for giving a sedative to surgical patients before anesthesia is administered. The report was published in the March 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Research Measures Perceptions of Physician Compassion

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients prefer physicians who convey a more optimistic message, and perceive in them a higher level of compassion, according to a study published online Feb. 26 in JAMA Oncology.

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Acetaminophen Risks May Be Underestimated

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen may not be as safe as previously thought, with larger doses and long-term use linked to increased risk of health problems, a new report contends. The findings were published online March 2 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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Higher Coffee Consumption Tied to Less Coronary Calcium

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking three to five cups of coffee a day may reduce the risk of developing coronary atherosclerosis, which in turn might reduce the risk for heart attack or stroke, a new study suggests. The report was published online March 2 in Heart.

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In Vitro Fertilization Birth Rates Continue to Rise

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 2,000 more infants were born with the help of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in 2013, compared with 2012, according to a new report from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology.

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Nuts, Including Peanut Butter, May Improve Longevity

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eating nuts, including peanuts and peanut butter, may increase longevity, new research suggests. The study is published online March 2 in JAMA Internal Medicine and was funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

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Treadmill-Based Fitness Score Can Predict 10-Year Survival

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A fitness risk score based on exercise stress testing is highly predictive of 10-year survival in adults free from established heart disease, according to a study published in the March issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Hospital Design Has Little Effect on Patient Satisfaction

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital design has little effect on patient satisfaction, according to a study published online Feb. 5 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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