March 2015 Briefing - Family Practice

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for March 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Mobile Health App Use Continuing to Increase

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of mobile health apps is continuing to increase and doctors are embracing this trend, with more than one-third of physicians recommending their use in the past year, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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USPSTF: Evidence Lacking for Routine Iron Supplementation

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Taking iron supplements during pregnancy doesn't appear to significantly change any health outcomes for mother or infant, a new review shows. A second review -- this one on infants and toddlers -- found no evidence that iron supplements improved growth or development. The findings on pregnant women were released online March 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The findings on children were published online March 30 in Pediatrics.

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Small, Steady Decline in Cancer Rates in U.S. Over Past Decade

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- America is making slow but steady progress against cancer, with a continuing decline in cancer deaths, according to a new report published online March 30 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The report was coauthored by experts from the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, the American Cancer Society, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

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Opioid-Induced Constipation Significant in Pain Patients

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is significant among noncancer pain patients, according to a study published online March 20 in Pain Medicine.

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An Apple a Day May Keep the Pharmacist Away

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Apple eaters are less likely to need a prescription medicine, according to new research. The study was published online March 30 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Glyburide in Gestational DM Linked to Complications

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When used to treat gestational diabetes, glyburide has been linked to a number of complications in the infant, according to a new study. The report was published online March 30 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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AAP: Use Only Metric Dosing for Children's Medications

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The best way to measure liquid medications for children is in metric milliliters, according to a committee from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Accidental medication overdoses send more than 70,000 children to U.S. emergency departments each year, according to background information with the statement, which was published online March 30 in Pediatrics.

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AAP Opposes Random Drug Testing in Schools

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a new report, the American Academy of Pediatrics reaffirms its stance against random drug testing in schools. The group suggests schools redirect their limited resources toward helping students avoid or overcome drug problems. The report was published online March 30 in Pediatrics.

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Multiple, Inappropriate Meds Taken by Older Cancer Patients

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A pharmacist-led comprehensive medication assessment shows that a high number of older oncology patients use multiple and/or inappropriate medications. The findings were published online March 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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2015 Match Sees High Proportion of Unmatched Seniors

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 6.1 percent of U.S. allopathic medical school seniors in the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) were not placed into first-year residency positions, with a higher percentage of unmatched seniors than in 2014, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Diabetes May Predispose to More Advanced Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with diabetes may have an increased risk of being diagnosed with advanced breast cancer, according to a new study published online March 17 in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment.

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MIND Diet Could Help Lower Dementia Risk

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who follow the "MIND" diet could lower risk for Alzheimer's, according to research published online in Alzheimer's & Dementia.

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2015 Internal Residency Match Up Slightly From 2014

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of U.S. medical students choosing internal medicine residencies has increased by about 5 percent in 2015, with about a 4 percent increase in the number of new internal medicine positions during this time, according to a report from the American College of Physicians (ACP).

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Nocturnal GERD Tied to Non-Infectious Rhinitis

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) appears to be a risk factor for non-infectious rhinitis (NIR), according to a study published online March 24 in Allergy.

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Discontinuing Statins for Terminally Ill May Improve QOL

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Discontinuing the use of cholesterol-lowering statins in terminally ill patients may improve their quality of life, according to a new study published online March 23 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Fish, ω-3 PUFAs Linked to Survival After Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High intake of fish and long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is associated with reduced all-cause mortality after breast cancer, according to a study published online March 24 in Cancer.

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Physician/Pharmacist Model Can Improve Mean BP

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A physician/pharmacist collaborative model can improve mean blood pressure (BP), according to a study published online March 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Early Palliative Care Improves Survival in Advanced Cancer

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Early initiation of palliative care (PC) interventions improves survival and caregiver burden in advanced cancer, according to two studies published online March 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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CDC: Hypertension-Related Deaths on the Rise in U.S.

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The overall death rate from hypertension in the United States has increased 23 percent since 2000, even as the death rate from all other causes has dropped 21 percent, according to a March data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Three Alcoholic Drinks Daily Can Up Risk of Liver Cancer

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People who have three or more alcoholic drinks per day could be raising their odds for liver cancer, according to a report from a panel of experts. On the other hand, the report, from the World Cancer Research Fund International, found "strong evidence" that drinking coffee might actually lower a person's odds for liver cancer.

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Cancer Risk Down for Men With High Midlife Fitness

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fit middle-aged men appear less likely to develop lung and colorectal cancer in later life than their out-of-shape peers. And if they do develop cancer, they are more likely to beat it, a new study suggests. The report was published online March 26 in JAMA Oncology.

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Cardiovascular Disease Risk Equation Can Be Applied Globally

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A cardiovascular disease risk equation has been developed that can be recalibrated for application in different countries, according to a report published online March 25 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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Prenatal Exposure to Pollutants May Affect Fetal Brain

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to common air pollutants before birth may make children more likely to have the symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other thinking and behavioral problems, a small new study suggests. The findings were published online March 25 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Prevalence of Subclinical Disease ID'd in African-Americans

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- African-Americans have a moderately high prevalence of subclinical disease, which is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published online March 12 in Diabetes Care.

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AAFP Issues Comprehensive Breastfeeding Toolkit

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new breastfeeding toolkit is available, which includes the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) business case for why employers should support breastfeeding, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

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E-Health Intervention Feasible in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For obese patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), an e-health intervention is feasible and effective for increasing physical activity and decreasing fat mass, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of The Spine Journal.

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Physicians Should Be Aware of Signs of Burnout

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Burnout can be prevented if physicians are aware of the warning signs, according to an article published by the American Medical Association.

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Greater Use of Antibiotics Tied to Higher Odds of Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Repeated use of certain antibiotics may increase a person's risk for type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. The study was published online March 24 in the European Journal of Endocrinology.

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FDA Approves New Treatment for Anthrax

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Anthrasil, Anthrax Immune Globulin Intravenous (Human), has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat patients with inhalational anthrax in combination with appropriate antibacterial drugs.

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Air Pollution May Contribute to High Anxiety

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution may take a toll not only on physical health, but mental well-being as well, according to two new studies published March 24 in The BMJ.

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Short Hospital Stays Don't Impair STEMI Outcomes in Seniors

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), outcomes are similar for discharge after 48 hours versus four to five days, according to a study published in the March 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Binge Eating Linked to Comorbidities in Obese Adults

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For obese adults, binge eating disorder (BED) may be associated with specific medical comorbidities, according to a study published online March 16 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Newly Identified Diabetes Up With Medicaid Expansion

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medicaid expansion is associated with an increase in diabetes diagnosis, according to a study published online March 23 in Diabetes Care.

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Outcome Not Affected by Family Presence During Resuscitation

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There are no significant differences in outcomes or processes of care for U.S. hospitals with policies allowing for family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) compared with hospitals without this policy, according to a study published online March 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Models May Predict Two-Year Mortality Risk for CKD Patients

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Risk prediction models with 16 characteristics may predict mortality risk in older adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The findings were published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Perceived Inefficiencies Rife in Primary Care

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care practices have multiple perceived inefficiencies in activities that occur pre-visit, during visits, and post-visit, according to an article published in the March-April issue of Family Practice Management.

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Majority of ER Doctors Admit Ordering Tests Defensively

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly all emergency department doctors recently surveyed said they order magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scans their patients may not need, mainly because they fear malpractice lawsuits. These findings were published online March 23 in Academic Emergency Medicine.

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Exercise Improves Men's Sexual Function Regardless of Race

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Men who exercise the most have higher sexual function scores, regardless of race, according to research published online March 20 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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2015 Diabetes Standards Focus on Individualized Tx Approach

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Therapeutic decisions for diabetes should be individualized, considering factors such as ethnicity and cardiovascular risk, according to an ideas and opinions piece published in the March 24 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Doctors May Not Be Informing of Alzheimer's Diagnosis

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are not telling a majority of their patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's that they have the degenerative brain disease, a new report by the Alzheimer's Association indicates.

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One in Nine Needs Emergency Revisit for Kidney Stones

TUESDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The need for repeat high-acuity care affects one in nine patients discharged from initial emergency department visits for kidney stones, according to a study published online March 16 in Academic Emergency Medicine.

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Rotational Instrument Delivery OK for Fetal Malposition

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal outcomes are no worse with rotational instrumental delivery than with cesarean delivery for persistent fetal malposition, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Exercise Training Cuts Rate of Injurious Falls in Older Women

MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older women, exercise is associated with reductions in the rate of injurious falls and injured fallers, according to a study published online March 23 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Family-Centered Care Improves Outcomes in Children With ADHD

MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), receiving more family-centered, compassionate care may be more effective than standard care, a new study has found. The findings were published online March 23 in Pediatrics.

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Hormone Therapy Not Detrimental to Women on Statins

MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hormone therapy is associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality in women treated with statins, according to a study published in the April issue of Menopause.

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Balance Compromised in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) have greater maximum and range of separations of their center of mass from their center of pressure, according to a study published online March 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Shoulder Dystocia Maneuvers Not Tied to Neonatal Harm

MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A variety of shoulder dystocia maneuvers are not associated with neonatal morbidity after adjusting for duration, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Electronic Solutions Underway for Rx Prior Authorizations

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts are underway to offer technological solutions to the burdens associated with prior authorizations, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Valacyclovir Cuts Viral Load in HIV-1+/HSV-2 Seronegative

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The prodrug valacyclovir (valACV) reduces viral load in HIV-1 infected herpes simplex virus (HSV)-2-seronegative patients, according to a study published online March 3 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Post-9/11 Work at Trade Center Site Ups Autoimmune Dz Risk

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Workers with prolonged exposure at the World Trade Center (WTC) site following 9/11 are at increased risk of developing systemic autoimmune diseases, according to a study published online March 16 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Universal Alcohol Interlock Could Cut Many Crash Deaths/Injuries

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Installation of an alcohol interlock device in all new U.S. vehicles is estimated to be cost-effective in preventing alcohol-related crash fatalities and injuries, according to a study published online March 19 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Cardiorespiratory Fitness Tied to Less DM, Despite Other Risks

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with a lower risk of incident diabetes, regardless of demographic characteristics and baseline risk factors, according to a study published online March 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Gaining Just 5 Kilograms Greatly Ups T2DM Risk After GDM

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), baseline and most recent body mass index (BMI) and weight gain after GDM correlate with increased long-term risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online March 18 in Diabetologia.

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Dietary Omega-3 Supplements Improve ADHD Symptoms

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation is associated with improvement in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms for children with ADHD and typically developing children, according to a study published online March 19 in Neuropsychopharmacology.

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Tool May Predict Short-Term Progression to Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have developed a new tool that may predict short-term glycemic progression to type 1 diabetes (T1D). The findings were published online March 10 in Diabetes Care.

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Public Outcomes Reporting Tied to Lower PCI Rates for Acute MI

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Public reporting of outcomes may be tied to lower rates of percutaneous revascularization and higher in-hospital mortality among acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients in reporting states, compared to nonreporting states, according to a study published in the March 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Handheld Echocardiography Ups Rheumatic Heart Dz Detection

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Handheld echocardiography (HAND) and auscultation improves detection of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) compared with auscultation alone, according to a study published online March 16 in Pediatrics.

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Assisted Reproductive Technology Linked to Autism

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Assisted reproductive technology (ART) is associated with increased incidence of autism, according to a study published online March 19 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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CDC: Decline in TB Rates in the United States Slowing Down

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As health officials in Kansas struggle with an outbreak of tuberculosis (TB) at a local high school, federal officials reported Thursday that the annual decline in U.S. cases is slowing. The report was published in the March 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Over Two Dozen Test Positive for TB at Kansas High School

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than 300 students and staff at Olathe Northwest High School were tested last week after a reported case of tuberculosis (TB) at the school. The testing identified 27 more people with TB infection, the Kansas City Star reported.

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Strength Training May Cut Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Asian Workers

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Strength training may help cut the risk of incident type 2 diabetes in a working-age Asian population, according to a study published online March 2 in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

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In-Clinic Health Coaching Improves Cardiometabolic Health

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health coaching by medical assistants can help improve hemoglobin A1c and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol control, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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New Assessment Tool Helps Predict Risk of Cognitive Decline

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new assessment tool may be able to predict risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in older adults, according to a study published online March 18 in Neurology.

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Antipsychotics May Up Risk of Premature Death in Dementia

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Antipsychotic drugs used to treat the delusions, hallucinations, agitation, and aggression that occur in many people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia may increase the risk of premature death more than previously thought, a new study suggests. The study was published online March 18 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Breastfeeding Linked to Improved IQ at Age 30

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding is associated with improved performance in intelligence tests at age 30, according to a study from Brazil published in the April issue of The Lancet Global Health.

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Workplace Suicides Up Sharply Since 2007

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Since 2007 there has been a sharp increase in workplace suicides, with certain occupations at higher risk, according to a study published online March 16 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Interventions Up Blood Culture Ordering in Pediatric Pneumonia

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Interventions can increase blood culture ordering in children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), with no effect on length of stay (LOS), according to a study published online March 16 in Pediatrics.

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WBC, Neutrophil Counts Predict Stroke Risk in Older Asian Men

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher total white blood cell (WBC) and neutrophil counts are independent predictors of stroke in older Japanese-American men, according to a study published online March 4 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Cardiovascular Screening in Men With ED Could Save Billions

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Screening men presenting with erectile dysfunction (ED) for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors can potentially cut future cardiovascular events and save billions of dollars over 20 years, according to a study published online March 2 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Jyoti Meditation Program Effective for Chronic Neck Pain

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An eight-week jyoti meditation program is effective for patients with chronic neck pain, according to a study published in the January issue of The Journal of Pain.

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Diet Soda Intake Tied to Belly Fat in Older Adults

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing diet soda intake (DSI) is tied to greater abdominal obesity in older adults, according to a study published online March 17 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Early Imaging Doesn't Improve Back Pain Outcomes in Seniors

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Early imaging is not associated with improved outcomes at one year among older adults with a new primary care visit for back pain, according to a study published in the March 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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More Than 16 Million Americans Have Gained Coverage Under ACA

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Obama Administration reported Monday the largest drop in the number of Americans without health insurance since the Johnson administration expanded health coverage through Medicare and Medicaid 50 years ago.

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Cardiac Screening Not Advised for Low-Risk Adults

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac screening with resting or stress electrocardiography, stress echocardiography, or myocardial perfusion imaging is not recommended for low-risk adults, according to a clinical guideline from the American College of Physicians published in the March 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Review: No Blood Pressure Lowering Effect for Vitamin D

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D supplementation is not associated with a reduction in blood pressure, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published online March 16 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Cancer Odds Up 40 Percent in Obese Women

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity takes a huge toll on health, and a new British study finds that obese women have a 40 percent higher risk for cancer than thinner women.

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Australian Health Council Says No Evidence Homeopathy Works

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The team at Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council reviewed 225 studies and concluded that homeopathy is no better than placebo, ABC News reported.

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Propranolol Seems Prophylactic Against Infantile Hemangiomas

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Propranolol seems to be prophylactic against infantile hemangiomas, according to a case report published online March 16 in Pediatrics.

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MMR Vaccination Rates Might Be As Low As 50 Percent

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination rates are estimated at between 50 and 86 percent among the population exposed to the recent measles outbreak, according to a research letter published online March 16 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Moderate Hypoglycemia Impacts Language Processing

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate hypoglycemia is associated with deterioration in language processing in adults with and without type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online March 10 in Diabetes Care.

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Gender-Specific Variation in Medical Specialties

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical specialties vary by gender, with obstetrics/gynecology and pediatrics dominated by female residents and specialties such as surgery, emergency medicine, and anesthesiology dominated by males, according to a report published by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Real-Time Decision Support Tool Aids ER Pneumonia Patients

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For emergency department patients with pneumonia, a real-time electronic clinical decision support tool could be beneficial, according to a study published online Feb. 26 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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HCPs Lack Knowledge and Awareness of Sex Trafficking

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health care providers demonstrate significant knowledge gaps regarding sex trafficking (ST), according to research published online March 16 in Pediatrics.

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CDC Releases Estimates of Cancer Incidence, Survival for 2011

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Estimates of cancer incidence for 2011 in the United States show that about two-thirds of those with cancer survive five or more years after diagnosis, according to a report published in the March 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Any Kidney Disease to Be Seen As Relevant in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic kidney disease (CKD) during pregnancy puts women and their babies at risk for certain types of problems, even if the disease is at an early stage and the mother-to-be has normal kidney function, according to a study published online March 12 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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The BMJ, CDC Partner to Report on Cold-Related Deaths

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of cold-related deaths in rural areas of the western United States is much higher than in other regions of the country, according to a new report published online March 12 in The BMJ.

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Hospitalist Continuity Doesn't Appear to Greatly Affect AEs

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Measures of hospitalist physician continuity do not show a consistent or significant association with the incidence of adverse events (AEs), according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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HHS Wants to Help Restore Joy of Medicine

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is listening to physicians and wants to address the regulatory burdens they face, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Researchers Estimate Physician Shortage for 2035

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Based on current demographics and utilization of primary care services, more than 44,000 primary care physicians will be needed by 2035, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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New Model Proposed for Hypersensitivity/Allergic Disease

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new model has been proposed for classification of hypersensitivity/allergic diseases ahead of the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), according to a position paper published online March 4 in Allergy.

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Patients Say Pain Control Is Key to Quality of Care in Hospitals

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Management of pain is an important component in improving the quality of care in hospitals from a patient's perspective, according to research published in the March issue of Pain Practice.

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Coalition Calls for Increased Colorectal Cancer Screening

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Boosting older adults' colorectal cancer screening rates to 80 percent by 2018 would lead to 21,000 fewer deaths from the cancer each year in the United States by 2030, according to research published March 12 in Cancer.

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Where You Live May Impact Use of Unnecessary Imaging

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with low-risk prostate or breast cancer may have higher or lower odds of getting an unnecessary imaging based on geography, according to a new study published online March 12 in JAMA Oncology.

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Getting Heard May Be Key to Getting New Job

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Your voice may be the key to landing a new job, researchers report in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science.

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Emotional Intelligence Peaks in Middle Age

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While some thinking skills begin to decline as one ages, researchers found that others don't peak until middle age or even later. The study will appear in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science.

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HealthDay/Harris Poll: More Americans in Favor of Vaccination

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the wake of the measles outbreak that has generated headlines for months, more Americans now say they have positive feelings toward childhood vaccinations, according to a new HealthDay/Harris Poll.

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IOM: Raise Legal Age to 21 for Tobacco Purchase

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Raising the legal age to buy tobacco products from 18 to 21 would save hundreds of thousands of lives and substantially reduce the number of smokers in the United States, a new report finds.

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AMA, CDC Partner to Focus on Diabetes Prevention

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing the number of Americans with type 2 diabetes is a new mission shared by the American Medical Association (AMA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, officials said Thursday.

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No Higher Odds of Breast Cancer in Transgender Patients

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While concerns remain regarding the long-term health effects of hormonal therapy on transgender patients, new research indicates that there is no higher risk of breast cancer in this group than in the general population.

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Poll: Majority of Americans Interested in Genetic Testing

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of Americans taking part in a new poll said they'd be interested in genetic testing to see if they or their children are at risk for serious illnesses. The findings were published online March 6 in Public Health Genomics.

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Powdered Alcohol Approved by U.S. Regulators

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. regulators have approved a controversial powdered alcohol product called Palcohol, which is meant to be mixed into drinks.

Health Highlights: March 11, 2015

Health Officials Warn of Blinding Cases of Syphilis on West Coast

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health care providers on the West Coast need to look out for syphilis that can cause blindness, public health officials say.

Health Highlights: March 11, 2015

More Support for 'Timing Hypothesis' in HRT Use

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There's yet another study looking at the potential dangers of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for menopausal symptoms, and this one supports the notion that the treatment may not help women's hearts. The findings were published online March 10 in The Cochrane Library.

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Single Paravertebral Blockade Seems Safe in Herpes Zoster

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute thoracic herpes zoster (HZ), a single paravertebral blockade seems safe and effective, according to a study published in the March issue of Pain Practice.

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Long-Term NSAID Use Beneficial in Knee Osteoarthritis

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with knee osteoarthritis, long-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use is associated with improvements in symptoms and disease progression, according to a study published in the March issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Clinical Trial Data Often Not Reported in Timely Manner

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers are not promptly reporting the results of clinical trials to ClinicalTrials.gov, according to an article published in the March 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Evidence Lacking for PT in Patients With Venous Leg Ulcers

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Further research is needed to understand the role of physical therapy in healing and quality of life (QOL) in patients with venous leg ulcers (VLUs), according to a systematic review published in the March issue of JAMA Dermatology.

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Patients With Multiple Conditions Need Early Outpatient Follow-Up

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The timeliness of outpatient follow-up after discharge matters most for patients with multiple chronic conditions and a greater than 20 percent baseline risk of readmission, according to research published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Physicians Should Plan Exit Strategy in Advance

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should begin planning their exit strategy three to five years in advance, according to the American Medical Association.

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Psychosocial Phone Counseling Aids Cervical Cancer Survivors

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A psychosocial telephone counseling (PTC) intervention can be beneficial for cervical cancer survivors, according to a study published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Frustrated by Regulations, Doctors Increasingly Miserable

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The nationwide Physician Misery Index is 3.7 out of 5, with the vast majority of physicians reporting that the business and regulation of health care has worsened the practice of medicine, according to a report published by Geneia.

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Age, Race May Affect Tx Decision Regret in Prostate Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Age, race, and other factors may influence treatment decisional regret among men with prostate cancer, according to research published online March 3 in Cancer.

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CVD Risk Up With Androgen Deprivation Tx in Prostate Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For men with prostate cancer (PCa), the risk for incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increased with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), according to a study published online March 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Melatonin Use in Children Raises Safety Concerns

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Considerable safety concerns surround use of melatonin for children with sleep disorders, according to a review article published online Feb. 3 in the Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health.

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Persistent EHR Nonadoption Could Mean Lower Payment

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Persistent nonadopters of electronic health records (EHRs) tend to be older, and are employed in smaller practices, according to a letter published in the March 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Stress + Depression = Deadly Combo in Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary heart disease, depression, and stress can be a deadly combination, according to a new study published online March 10 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Hospitalizations After Sepsis Resolution Often Preventable

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When patients survive sepsis, it's common for them to be readmitted to the hospital within a few months, but this can often be avoided, according to research published in the March 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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HSV-2 Vaccine Shows Promise in Experimental Research

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study in mice hints at the success of a vaccine against the herpes simplex virus. The research was published online March 9 in eLife.

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Subthreshold Mania May Mean Bipolarity in High-Risk Youth

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Subthreshold manic or hypomanic episodes may be a diagnostic precursor to bipolar disorder in the children of parents with bipolar disorder, according to research published online March 3 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Susac Syndrome Is Possibility in Cases of Acute Confusion

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For young patients presenting with acute confusion, Susac syndrome should be considered, according to a case report published online Feb. 10 in the Journal of Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases.

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AAMC: Significant Shortfall of Physicians Projected for 2025

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The expected shortfall of physicians is projected to reach about 46,000 to 90,000 by 2025, according to a study conducted by IHS Inc. for the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Limited Evidence Supporting Herbal Meds in GI Disorders

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Limited evidence supports use of herbal remedies in gastrointestinal disorders, and the lack of quality control must be considered, according to research published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Family Hx of Prostate CA May Increase Risk of Breast CA Too

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A family history of prostate cancer may be tied to a woman's risk of breast cancer, according to a new study published online March 9 in Cancer.

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FDA Approves New CPR Devices

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) system designed to increase the chance of survival in people experiencing cardiac arrest has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Vegetarian Diet Tied to Reduced Risk of Colorectal Cancer

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A vegetarian diet might cut the risk of colorectal cancer by 20 percent, according to new research. For fish-eating vegetarians, the protective link is even stronger, according to a study published online March 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Physical Labor, High BP, Multiple Meds Affect Male Fertility

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hard physical work, high blood pressure, and taking multiple medications are among the factors that may lower sperm quality and make men less fertile, new research finds. The study was published online March 9 in Fertility and Sterility.

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Paternal, Maternal Depression May Up Asthma Risk for Baby

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A child may face an increased risk of asthma if the child's mother or father experienced depression during the pregnancy or if the mother took an older antidepressant to treat her condition, new research suggests. The study findings were published online March 9 in Pediatrics.

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Cleaning Umbilical Cord With Chlorhexidine Lowers Mortality

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Using chlorhexidine to clean the umbilical cords of infants born outside of a hospital lowers infant infection and death rates in developing countries, according to a review published online March 5 in The Cochrane Library.

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Reminders Improve Practices' Quality-Assurance Testing

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Practices' adherence to a quality-assurance program for point-of-care testing (POCT) devices can be improved with reminders, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Educational Intervention Can Cut Inappropriate PPI Prescriptions

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A monthly educational intervention paired with a web-based quality improvement tool is feasible for increasing the proportion of inappropriate proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prescriptions discontinued at hospital discharge, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Model Explores Impact of Vitamin D, Omega-3 Deficiency

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A model has been proposed to explain the influence of inadequate vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids on brain dysfunction via serotonin levels, according to a review published online Feb. 24 in The FASEB Journal.

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Changes Being Made to Med School Applicant Assessment

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In accordance with the changes in graduate medical education to better prepare doctors for a changing health care system, changes are being made to medical school applicant evaluation, according to an article published Feb. 19 by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Psychotherapy for Child Anxiety Offers Long-Term Benefits

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Successful cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for an anxiety disorder in childhood is associated with lasting protection against suicidal ideation, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Extended Pre-Cessation Bupropion Helps Smokers Quit

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Extended pre-quit bupropion is associated with reduced smoking behavior during the pre-quit period and improved short-term abstinence rates, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Nicotine & Tobacco Research.

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More Otologic Symptoms, Hearing Loss for HIV-Infected

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Otologic symptoms and hearing loss are more common among patients with HIV than uninfected controls, according to a study published online March 5 in JAMA Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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National Hospital Rating Systems Rarely in Agreement

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- National hospital rating systems are rarely in agreement, according to a study published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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Confidence Gap Between Male and Female Med Students

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Female medical students perform at the same or higher level as men, but they lack confidence compared with men, according to a letter published in the March 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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FDA Launches First App to Identify Drug Shortages

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A mobile phone application (app) has been released to identify current drug shortages, resolved shortages, or discontinuations of drug products, according to a press release published by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Statins Tied to Decreased Insulin Sensitivity, Secretion

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Statin drugs may significantly increase a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a new study from Finland suggests. The findings were published March 4 in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

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Coping With Stress May Be As Key to Heart Health As Exercise

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who have trouble coping with stress may face an increased risk for future coronary heart disease that even exercise can't erase, a new study suggests. The report was published online March 4 in Heart.

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One-Third of U.S. More Than Hour Away From Stroke Center

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One-third of Americans can't be transported by ambulance to a stroke center within one hour, according to research published online March 4 in Neurology.

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Study Examines Palliative Care in Cardiac Intensive Care Units

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Increased palliative care education and training among clinicians who are involved in cardiac critical care could benefit care, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Rush University Adds Patient Scores to Doctor Profiles

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Rush University Medical Center's website has started adding the results of patient surveys to individual physician profiles, according to a report published by the medical center.

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Six Months of Valganciclovir in CMV Provides Long-Term Benefit

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For neonates with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV), six months of valganciclovir does not improve hearing in the short term, but is associated with improved outcomes in the long term, according to a study published in the March 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Major Health, Cost Burden for U.S. Patients With Eczema

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with eczema have a major health burden with significantly increased health care utilization and costs, according to study published online March 4 in JAMA Dermatology.

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CDC: Heroin Overdose Mortality Nearly Tripled 2010 to 2013

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The age-adjusted rate for deaths involving opioid analgesics has leveled in recent years; however, the rate for deaths involving heroin has almost tripled since 2010, U.S. health officials reported Wednesday.

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Many PCPs Not Using Rx Drug Monitoring Programs Routinely

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most primary care physicians are aware of state prescription drug monitoring programs, and more than half report using one, according to research published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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Aerobic Fitness Can Predict Post-Op Complications in AAA Repair

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, measures of cardiopulmonary fitness can predict postoperative complications, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Anaesthesia.

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Anemia Linked to Adverse Outcomes in Atrial Fibrillation

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with atrial fibrillation receiving anticoagulant treatment, the presence of anemia is associated with increased risk of thromboembolic events, bleeding complications, and mortality, according to research published online Feb. 13 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Use of Anticholinergic Meds May Up Pneumonia Risk for Elderly

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of anticholinergic medications may increase risk of pneumonia in the elderly, a new study suggests. The findings were published online March 2 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Study Challenges Management of Benign Thyroid Nodules

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Benign thyroid nodules are common, and research suggests they don't need to be monitored as closely as current guidelines recommend. The findings were published in the March 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Estimates of Childhood ADHD Worldwide Differ Significantly

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 7 percent of children worldwide have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), new research concludes. The study was published online March 3 in Pediatrics.

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In Vitro Fertilization Birth Rates Continue to Rise

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 2,000 more infants were born with the help of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in 2013, compared with 2012, according to a new report from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology.

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Both High and Low Intensity Exercise Benefit Weight, Waist

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For people who are obese and sedentary, any exercise can help trim abdominal fat, but it may take a bit more effort to get other health benefits, a new study suggests. The findings were published in the March 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Higher Coffee Consumption Tied to Less Coronary Calcium

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking three to five cups of coffee a day may reduce the risk of developing coronary atherosclerosis, which in turn might reduce the risk for heart attack or stroke, a new study suggests. The report was published online March 2 in Heart.

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Acetaminophen Risks May Be Underestimated

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen may not be as safe as previously thought, with larger doses and long-term use linked to increased risk of health problems, a new report contends. The findings were published online March 2 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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Severe Obesity in Youth Even Riskier Than Thought

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Extremely obese children -- such as those at least 100 pounds overweight -- are in deeper trouble in terms of cardiovascular disease risks than doctors have thought, new research suggests. The study appears online March 2 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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ACP Issues Recommendations for Management of Pressure Ulcers

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations have been developed for the prevention and management of pressure ulcers, and published as two American College of Physicians (ACP) clinical practice guidelines in the March 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Age-Specific Causal Link for Adiposity, CV Risk Factors

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adiposity has an age-specific causal effect on cardiovascular risk factors, according to research published online Feb. 23 in Diabetes.

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Research Measures Perceptions of Physician Compassion

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients prefer physicians who convey a more optimistic message, and perceive in them a higher level of compassion, according to a study published online Feb. 26 in JAMA Oncology.

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Treadmill-Based Fitness Score Can Predict 10-Year Survival

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A fitness risk score based on exercise stress testing is highly predictive of 10-year survival in adults free from established heart disease, according to a study published in the March issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Tracking Growth Can Facilitate Earlier ID of Celiac in Children

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Growth monitoring programs may help identify children with celiac disease, according to a new study published in the March issue of JAMA Pediatrics.

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Nuts, Including Peanut Butter, May Improve Longevity

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eating nuts, including peanuts and peanut butter, may increase longevity, new research suggests. The study is published online March 2 in JAMA Internal Medicine and was funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

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U.S. Nurse Who Contracted Ebola Sues Employer

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An American nurse who contracted Ebola is suing her employer.

Health Highlights: March 2, 2015

Majority of Doctors Yield to Parents' Vaccine Delay Requests

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors commonly get requests from parents to delay young children's vaccinations -- and often give in, according to the results of a new U.S. study. The findings, published online March 2 in Pediatrics, come at a time of rising concerns about "under-vaccination."

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Mitral Valve Repair Could Improve Mental Health

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with mitral regurgitation (MR) have less depression and anxiety after they undergo surgical repair, according to research published in the March issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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High Prevalence of HCV in Baby Boomers Presenting to ER

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of unrecognized chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is high among baby boomers presenting to the emergency department, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in Hepatology.

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Hospital Design Has Little Effect on Patient Satisfaction

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital design has little effect on patient satisfaction, according to a study published online Feb. 5 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Cannabis Linked to Increased Risk of Cerebrovascular Events

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cannabis seems to be linked to cerebrovascular events, according to research published online Feb. 19 in Stroke.

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Suicidal Ideation Prevalent in Patients With Fibromyalgia

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Suicidal ideation is prevalent among patients with fibromyalgia and is strongly associated with mental health, according to a study published in the February issue of Pain Practice.

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