June 2016 Briefing - Geriatrics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Geriatrics for June 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

FDA Approves Eye Implant to Correct Presbyopia in Middle Age

THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An implant that helps the aging eye focus on small print and nearby objects has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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End-of-Life Decision-Making Video Aids Heart Failure Patients

THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Watching a video about end-of-life care options may help patients with advanced heart failure choose the approach best for them, according to a study published online June 29 in Circulation.

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Butter May Not Be As Unhealthy As Previously Thought

THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Butter may not be the unhealthy food many Americans believe it to be; however, that doesn't mean that butter provides any real health benefit, according to research published online June 29 in PLOS ONE.

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Testosterone Gel Improves Sexual Function in Older Men

THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older men treated with testosterone gel experience a moderate but significant improvement in their sex drive, sexual activity, and erectile function compared to men given a placebo gel, according to a study published online June 29 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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Too Little, Too Much Sleep Can Impair Insulin Sensitivity in Men

WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Too much or too little sleep may raise the risk of diabetes in men, but not women, according to a study published online June 29 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Progress Slowing Down in U.S.

WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of decline in cardiovascular disease mortality has decelerated, according to research published online June 29 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Religious Service Attendance May Lower Suicide Risk in Women

WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who regularly attend religious services may have a lower risk of suicide than those who don't, according to research published online June 29 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Electronic Record Demands Are Overwhelming Many Physicians

WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians using electronic practice tools report higher rates of burnout and increased frustration with the amount of computerized paperwork, according to research published online June 27 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Escitalopram Not Beneficial for Heart Failure Patients

WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The antidepressant escitalopram may not help heart failure patients suffering from depression, according to research published in the June 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Pharmacy Programs to ID Opioid Abuse Effective, but Underused

WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pharmacy programs to reduce opioid abuse are effective but underused, according to a new study published in the July issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

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Prostate Cancer Diagnoses Down From 2011 to 2013

WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 2011 to 2013 there was a decrease in prostate cancer (PC) diagnoses, especially for younger men and low-risk disease, according to a research letter published online June 23 in JAMA Oncology.

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Depression Cuts Adherence to COPD Maintenance Meds

WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, depression is associated with decreased adherence to maintenance medication regimens for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published online June 22 in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Unsatisfactory Chewing, Poor Diet Up Hospital Stay in Elderly

WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults, unsatisfactory chewing ability and poor diet are associated with longer hospital stays, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Too Many Elderly, Terminal Patients Getting Unnecessary Tx

TUESDAY, June 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients dying in old age often receive unnecessary end-of-life medical treatments in hospitals, according to research published online June 27 in the International Journal for Quality in Health Care.

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Coprescribing Naloxone to Opioid Users Helps Reduce ER Visits

TUESDAY, June 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients on long-term opioid therapy who receive prescriptions for naloxone are less likely to return for emergency care related to opioid use, according to a study published online June 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Omega-3s Tied to Lower Risk of Fatal Coronary Heart Disease

TUESDAY, June 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Regularly eating fish and other foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids may lower the risk of fatal coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a review published online June 27 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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End-of-Life Care Received Varies Based on Type of Disease

TUESDAY, June 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Family-reported quality of end-of-life care is significantly better for patients with cancer or dementia than for patients with other chronic conditions, according to research published online June 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine to coincide with presentation at AcademyHealth's Annual Research Meeting, held from June 26 to 28 in Boston.

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Patients Face High Hospital Bills Despite Having Insurance

MONDAY, June 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Costs of hospitalization for privately insured adults rose more than 37 percent over five years, with patients paying more than $1,000 on average by 2013, according to research published online June 27 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Autologous Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells May Ease Knee OA

MONDAY, June 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with knee osteoarthritis, a single intra-articular injection of autologous adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) can reduce pain and inflammation, according to research published online May 23 in Stem Cells Translational Medicine.

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ALT Levels Within Normal Range Linked to Cardiovascular Events

MONDAY, June 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels within normal range are associated with cardiovascular event risk, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Vaginal Pessary Beneficial in Pelvic Organ Prolapse

MONDAY, June 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse (POP), use of vaginal pessary in addition to pelvic floor exercises is associated with improvements in prolapse symptoms and quality of life, according to a study published in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Catheter Reduction Programs Do Reduce Use of Catheters

MONDAY, June 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Catheter reduction programs are associated with a reduction in the number of catheter days per 100 patient-days, according to a research letter published online June 17 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Mortality Up With No Revascularization in NSTEMI

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mortality is increased for patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) who do not undergo coronary revascularization, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Diabetes Increases Mortality Risk After Acute Myocardial Infarction

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with diabetes are much more likely to die after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) than patients without diabetes, according to a study published online June 15 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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2017 Will Bring Premium Rate Increases Under ACA

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Health insurance premiums under the Affordable Care Act will rise in 2017, analysts and insurance brokers say.

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Diabetes Plus Kidney Disease Raises CVD Risk in Blacks

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For black Americans with diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD) appears to increase the risk of cardiovascular mortality, according to a study published online June 23 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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High-Fiber Diet May Promote Healthy, Disease-Free Aging

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A diet inclusive of foods rich in fiber may fuel more successful aging, according to research published online June 1 in the Journals of Gerontology.

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CDC: FluMist Nasal Flu Vaccine Should Not Be Used 2016-2017

THURSDAY, June 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The nasal spray form of the influenza vaccine should not be used next flu season, according to an announcement late Wednesday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Panel on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

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Digital Technology Holds Potential in Emergency CVD Care

THURSDAY, June 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smartphones, apps, and other digital technology could speed emergency care to patients experiencing an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, or cardiac arrest, according to a new report issued by the American Heart Association (AHA) and published online June 22 in Circulation.

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CDC: Alternative Medicine a Booming Business in U.S.

WEDNESDAY, June 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Americans spent more than $30 billion out of pocket in 2012 on chiropractors and other complementary health practitioners, as well as supplements and other forms of alternative medicine, according to research published online June 22 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health Statistics Reports.

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Male PCPs Less Likely to Assess CVD Risk in Female Patients

WEDNESDAY, June 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many male primary care physicians regard cardiovascular disease as a man's issue and don't assess risk in female patients, according to research published online June 21 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

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Risk of Cardiovascular Events Up in Black Patients With A-Fib

WEDNESDAY, June 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Black Americans with atrial fibrillation are at higher risk than whites for serious cardiovascular complications and death, according to a study published online June 22 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Statins Could Reduce Risk of Infection in Stroke Patients

WEDNESDAY, June 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Statins could significantly reduce the risk of infection in stroke patients, according to a study published online June 9 in the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases.

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APCs, Doctors Order Low-Value Services With Similar Frequency

WEDNESDAY, June 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Advanced practice clinicians (APCs) and physicians order low-value health services with similar frequency, according to a study published online June 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Vitamin K Antagonists Appear to Be Well Tolerated

WEDNESDAY, June 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are well tolerated and have a minimal effect on quality of life, according to a study published online June 21 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Nine-Protein Risk Score May Help Predict CV Events in Stable CHD

WEDNESDAY, June 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A nine-protein risk score may help predict cardiovascular events among patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study published in the June 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Tips Provided for Leveraging Social Media

TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- During a presentation at the 2016 American Medical Association Annual Meeting, Kevin Pho, M.D., founder and editor of the popular physician blog KevinMD, shared insights into making a difference in health care through use of social media.

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Moderately Low LDL May Be Enough to Ward Off CVD Risk

TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Very low target low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels may not benefit all patients with preexisting heart disease, according to a study published online June 20 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Too Many A-Fib Patients Taking Aspirin Instead of Anticoagulant

TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-third of U.S. patients with atrial fibrillation who need anticoagulation to prevent strokes aren't receiving it, according to a study published in the June 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Persistent High Spending Common in Year Before Death

TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Almost half of older Medicare beneficiaries have high persistent spending throughout the full year before death, according to a study published in the June issue of Health Affairs.

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Placebo Effect Seen in Brain-Training Program Effectiveness

TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive-training programs may be offering only placebo effects, according to a study published online June 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Rates of Parkinson's Disease Rising Among U.S. Males

MONDAY, June 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of Parkinson's disease have increased for U.S. men over the past three decades, and the trend could be tied to declines in smoking, according to a report published online June 20 in JAMA Neurology.

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Reset Room Can Help Address Physician Burnout

MONDAY, June 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The creation of a reset room is one of several solutions that can help physicians and medical providers address burnout, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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One Free Meal From Industry Ups Brand-Name Rx Among Doctors

MONDAY, June 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who receive even one free meal, valued at less than $20 on average, are more likely to prescribe a promoted brand-name drug than a cheaper generic alternative, compared with doctors who did not accept a meal, according to a study published online June 20 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Life Expectancy Doesn't Influence Care of Keratinocyte Carcinoma

MONDAY, June 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Life expectancy does not appear to influence patterns of treatment for keratinocyte carcinoma (KC), according to a study published online June 15 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Tax Incentives Being Offered to Primary Care Preceptors

MONDAY, June 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Tax incentives are being offered to encourage physicians to serve as preceptors to medical students, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians.

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Strategy Needed to Address Impending Physician Shortage

FRIDAY, June 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Steps should be taken to combat the impending physician shortage of between 61,700 and 94,700 doctors that the United States is expected to face over the next decade, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Soles of the Feet Should Also Be Checked for Skin Cancer

THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stress and damage caused by walking or running could be a risk factor for melanoma on the soles of the feet, according to a research letter published in the June 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Pharmacist Involvement Can Improve Cardiovascular Care

THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with poorly controlled cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors could improve their prognosis by having pharmacists help manage their care, according to a study published in the June 21 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Potential Impact of Single-Payer Health Care Discussed

THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is promoting his version of single-payer health care, although the actual impact of such a system is unclear, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Prices for Care Rise Significantly As Multi-Hospital Systems Emerge

THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital prices in California increased substantially from 2004 to 2013, with a larger increase in hospitals that are members of multi-hospital systems, according to a study published online June 9 in Inquiry.

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USPSTF Reaffirms Need for CRC Screen Beginning at Age 50

THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Reiterating a recommendation last made in 2008, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) is advocating that regular colorectal cancer (CRC) screening begin at age 50 and continue until at least age 75. The updated recommendation was published online June 15 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Sleep-Disordered Breathing Ups Risk of Complications After PCI

THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) may increase the risk of serious complications in patients who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to research published online June 15 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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No Conclusive Link Between Melanoma Risk, PDE5 Inhibitors

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The small apparent increase in risk of melanoma in men prescribed phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors may be explained by greater sun exposure, according to new research published online June 14 in PLOS Medicine.

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Several Heart Conditions Affected Differently by Alcohol

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Texans living in "dry" counties are more likely to suffer myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure than those living in nearby "wet" counties, where alcohol sales are legal; however, atrial fibrillation is less likely in dry counties, according to a study published online June 14 in The BMJ.

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Four-Step Strategy Suggested for Boosting Practice Quality of Care

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Four steps can help doctors improve patient care and office efficiency, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Long-Acting Opioids May Increase Risk of All-Cause Mortality

TUESDAY, June 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid use may significantly increase mortality risk, according to a study published in the June 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Home-Based Primary Care Model Can Produce Medicare Savings

TUESDAY, June 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The home-based primary care (HBPC) model at the core of the Independence at Home (IAH) Demonstration has the potential to produce considerable savings for Medicare and Medicaid, according to research published online May 31 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Hospital Care of Hypertensive Urgency Doesn't Up Outcomes

TUESDAY, June 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Most cases of hypertensive urgency can be safely managed in an outpatient setting, according to research published online June 13 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Resident-on-Resident Aggression at Nursing Homes Not Uncommon

TUESDAY, June 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many elderly adults in nursing homes face aggressive or disturbing behavior from their fellow residents, according to a study published online June 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Many Patients Prescribed Opioids Sharing Leftover Pills

MONDAY, June 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of patients prescribed opioids receive more than they need, and many share the drugs or fail to store them securely, according to research published online June 13 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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American Seniors With Diabetes Living Longer Without Disability

MONDAY, June 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- American seniors with diabetes are starting to live longer without disabilities, according to a study published online June 10 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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Persistent Depression Linked to Increased CAC Scores in Women

MONDAY, June 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Persistent depressive symptoms are associated with increased coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores among middle-aged women without cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published in the June 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Senior Runners Expend Similar Energy As Younger Runners

FRIDAY, June 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Runners over age 65 could burn oxygen at nearly the same rate as much younger runners, according to a study published in the April issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

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Risk of S. aureus Bacteremia Up in Patients on Glucocorticoids

FRIDAY, June 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients taking systemic glucocorticoids are at higher risk for community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (CA-SAB), according to research published online June 8 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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California's Right-to-Die Law Now in Effect

THURSDAY, June 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- California on Thursday becomes the fifth and largest state in the country to allow terminally ill patients to end their own lives.

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Women With A-Fib Less Likely to Receive Oral Anticoagulants

THURSDAY, June 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with atrial fibrillation, women are less likely than men to receive oral anticoagulant therapy, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Temporal hs-cTnT Increase Linked to Risk of CHD, CHF

THURSDAY, June 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Temporal increases in high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and all-cause mortality, according to a study published online June 8 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Postural Instability Predicts Off-Loading Nonadherence in T2DM

THURSDAY, June 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), off-loading adherence is associated with healing, but postural instability is a powerful predictor of nonadherence, according to a study published online June 6 in Diabetes.

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Change in Physician Call System May Up Readmission Rates

THURSDAY, June 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Change in physician call systems may increase hospital readmission rates, according to a study published recently in The American Journal of Medicine.

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Chemo Ups Metabolic Syndrome Risk in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, June 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with early-stage breast cancer with no preexisting metabolic syndrome (MetS), chemotherapy is associated with increased risk of MetS, according to a study published online May 24 in Cancer.

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Anemia Independently Linked to High Platelet Reactivity in PCI

THURSDAY, June 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Anemia is independently associated with high platelet reactivity (HPR) and is associated with all-cause mortality and major bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Cut Opioid Use

WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of prescription drug monitoring programs can reduce the prescribing of Schedule II opioids, according to a study published in the June issue of Health Affairs.

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No Significant Weight Change With Adjuvant Sulfonylureas

WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sulfonylureas used as add-on therapy to metformin can maintain glycemic control in type 2 diabetes, without changing body weight, according to a study published online June 6 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Wearable Artificial Kidney Does Well in Proof-of-Concept Trial

WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A wearable artificial kidney may be an upcoming option for dialysis patients, according to a proof-of-concept study published online June 2 in JCI Insight.

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PPI Use Ups Risk of Osteoporosis, Osteopenia in Femur

WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use is associated with increased risk of developing osteoporosis and osteopenia in femur bones, according to a study published online May 31 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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Opinions Vary on Management of Subclinical Hypothyroidism

TUESDAY, June 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians' opinions on management of subclinical hypothyroidism vary, according to a Beyond the Guidelines article published online June 7 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Serious Bleeding Risks Linked to OTC Antacids Containing Aspirin

MONDAY, June 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antacids that contain aspirin may cause stomach or intestinal bleeding in rare cases, U.S. Food and Drug Administration officials said Monday.

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Severe Hypoglycemia Risk Nearly Doubles With Intensive T2DM Tx

MONDAY, June 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive diabetes mellitus treatment nearly doubles the risk of severe hypoglycemia requiring medical attention in clinically complex patients, according to a study published online June 6 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Hip Arthroscopy Often Not the Best Option for Older Patients

MONDAY, June 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients in their 60s who have hip arthroscopy need total hip arthroplasty (THA) within two years, according to research published in the April issue of Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery.

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U-Shaped Pattern for Dietary Calcium Intake, Fracture Risk

MONDAY, June 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary calcium intake seems to have a U-shaped correlation with fracture risk in men and possibly in women, according to a study published online May 21 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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Ventricular Ectopic QRS Interval May Be Useful Post-MI Marker

MONDAY, June 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The ventricular ectopic QRS interval (VEQSI) can identify post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients with prior serious ventricular arrhythmia, according to a study published online June 1 in JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology.

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Many Still on Opioids Six Months After Total Joint Arthroplasty

FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A significant number of patients continue to take prescription opioids many months after joint replacement surgery, according to a study published in the June issue of Pain.

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High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin I Assay Shows Efficiency in ER

FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I assay can help identify or exclude the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI) in the emergency department, according to two studies published online June 1 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Stem Cells Can Restore Motor Function in Stroke Patients

FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Injecting modified, human, adult stem cells directly into the brain is a safe and effective way to restore motor function in stroke patients long after their stroke occurred, according to a study published online June 2 in Stroke.

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15.5 Million Americans Now Surviving Cancer

FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer survivors in the United States reached record numbers this year -- 15.5 million -- and the American Cancer Society predicts they'll total more than 20 million in another decade. The report, prepared by the American Cancer Society in collaboration with the U.S. National Cancer Institute, was published online June 2 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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More Evidence That Low-Dose Aspirin Ups Survival in CRC

FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who take low-dose aspirin may have better survival odds, according to a study published online May 31 the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Contraindication to Antiplatelet Rx for ~18 Percent With PCI

FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- About 18 percent of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have a contraindication to commonly used antiplatelet medications, according to a study published online May 31 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Spironolactone No Benefit for Knee OA in Older Adults

FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA), spironolactone is not associated with improvements in symptoms, physical function, or health-related quality-of-life, according to a study published in the May issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Breast Cancer Survivors Benefit From Mindfulness Meditation

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mindfulness meditation seems to help breast cancer patients better manage symptoms of fatigue, anxiety, and fear of recurrence, according to a study published online May 31 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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AMA Module Promotes Training of Medical Assistants

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new training module can improve training for medical assistants (MAs), according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Patients Like to See Physicians Wearing White Coats

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients prefer that physicians wear white coats, according to research published online June 1 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Low Glycemic Index Diet Linked to Drop in Uric Acid Levels

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing the dietary glycemic index is associated with a reduction in uric acid levels among overweight and obese adults, according to a study published in the May issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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New Program May Help Cut UTIs Associated With Catheter Use

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new program may help reduce both urinary catheter use and its associated infections, according to research findings published in the June 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CVD Risk Appears to Be Increased in Women With Migraine

WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who suffer from migraine headaches may have a slightly increased risk of heart disease or stroke, according to a study published online May 31 in The BMJ.

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FDA Urges Food Manufacturers to Reduce Sodium in Their Products

WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants the food industry to voluntarily reduce the amount of sodium in processed and commercially prepared food.

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More Evidence That Air Pollution Raises Blood Pressure

WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is more evidence linking air pollution with increased risk of developing hypertension, according to a review published online May 31 in Hypertension.

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Blood-Brain Barrier Leaks Seen in Patients With Early Alzheimer's

WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease may have more leakages in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), according to a study published online May 31 in Radiology.

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Public Reporting Doesn't Improve Mortality Rates

WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Among Medicare patients, public reporting of mortality rates was associated with a slowing in the ongoing decrease in mortality rates, according to a study published online May 31 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Patients With IBS Often Have Negative Health Care Encounters

WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients suffering from severe irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) often have negative experiences of health care encounters, and actively negotiate such professional discourse by presenting a counternarrative describing their own suffering and strengths, according to a study published online May 24 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Vigilance Urged for Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia

WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Diagnosis and management of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) are discussed in a review published in the May 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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