July 2016 Briefing - Pulmonology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pulmonology for July 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Exercising One Hour/Day May Eliminate Sitting's Toll on Health

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Just one hour of physical activity a day -- something as simple as a brisk walk or a bicycle ride -- may undo the increased mortality risk that comes with sitting eight hours or more on a daily basis, according to research published online July 27 in The Lancet.

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Clinicians Should Consider Valley Fever in Some Flu Patients

THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians should suspect coccidioidomycosis, also known as San Joaquin Valley fever, in patients with pneumonia or ongoing flu-like symptoms who live in or have visited the west or southwest United States, especially Arizona and central California, according to updated guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) published online July 27 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Potential New Asthma Genes ID'd in Genome-Wide Study

THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Potential new asthma genes have been identified in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) combined with subsequent lung expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis, according to research published online July 20 in Allergy.

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Marijuana May Cause More Damage to Heart Than Tobacco

THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an experimental study published online July 27 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, lab rats experienced substantially impaired endothelial function after a minute's exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) from marijuana.

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Nonvascular Thoracic MRI Improves Clinical Decision Making

THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Assessment with nonvascular thoracic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging improves clinical decision making, according to a study published in the August issue of Radiology.

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Fitness Almost As Important As Not Smoking for Longevity

WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Poor physical fitness ranks right behind smoking as leading risk factors for early mortality, according to a study published online July 26 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

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FDA Strengthens Safety Warnings for Fluoroquinolones

WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday that it's strengthening label warnings on fluoroquinolones because the drugs can lead to disabling side effects, including long-term nerve damage and ruptured tendons.

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Flu Vaccine Protective Against Hospitalization, Death in T2DM

WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The seasonal influenza vaccine may significantly reduce mortality for patients with type 2 diabetes, as well as hospitalizations for stroke and cardiovascular and pulmonary issues, according to a study published online July 25 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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American Red Cross Says Blood Donations Needed Urgently

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The American Red Cross says it has an urgent need for blood donations, with less than a five-day supply of blood on hand to help those who need it.

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Medical Students Often Track Progress of Former Patients

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. medical students use electronic health records to track the progress of their former patients and confirm the accuracy of their diagnoses, according to research letter published online July 25 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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'Walking Meetings' Feasible Strategy for Employee Wellness

MONDAY, July 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Converting a single weekly meeting to a walking meeting can help raise work-related physical activity levels of white-collar workers, according to a report published online June 23 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Health Expenditures Rising for Middle Class, Wealthy

THURSDAY, July 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While overall U.S. medical spending growth slowed between 2004 and 2013, expenditures rose for middle- and high-income Americans, according to research published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

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Structured Pretravel Advice Should Be Provided to Patients

THURSDAY, July 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Structured advice should be provided to individuals planning to travel internationally, according to a review article published in the July 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Higher Education Linked to Reduced Post-MI Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) survivors with higher levels of education are less likely to develop heart failure, according to a study published online July 20 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

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Medicare Spending Up for Decedents Versus Survivors

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Medicare per capita spending was much higher for beneficiaries who died during 2014 than for those who survived the entire year, according to a report published by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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Diabetes Confers Worse Prognosis for Patients With ACS

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), diabetes confers a worse prognosis, according to a study published in the Aug. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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X-Rays Have Low Diagnostic Yield for Pulmonary Metastases

TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients treated for T1a renal cell carcinoma, chest X-rays have low diagnostic yield for detecting pulmonary metastases, according to a study published in the August issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Labor Compensation, Purchased Goods, Service Biggest Spends

TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Labor compensation remains the single largest contributor to costs among physicians' offices, hospitals, and outpatient care centers, according to a report published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

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Fracking Site Proximity May Affect Asthma Exacerbation Risk

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Living near fracking sites may lead to asthma exacerbations, according to a study published online July 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Burnout Can Have Acute Personal, Professional Consequences

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stress and burnout are increasingly prevalent among physicians, with serious personal and professional consequences, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Cancer Patients, Oncologists Have Discordant Opinions on Prognosis

FRIDAY, July 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients and their oncologists often hold different opinions about the patient's chances for survival and how long they might live, according to a study published online July 14 in JAMA Oncology.

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Growth in U.S. Health Spending Set to Average 5.8 Percent

FRIDAY, July 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Growth in U.S. health spending is expected to average 5.8 percent for 2015 to 2025, according to a study published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

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Supreme Court Ruling Could Impact Med School Admissions

THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling upholding the University of Texas at Austin's consideration of race and ethnicity in college admissions has implications for medical schools, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Differences in Salary for Male, Female Faculty Physicians

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For physicians with faculty appointments at 24 U.S. public medical schools there are significant salary differences between men and women, even after adjustment for confounding variables, according to a study published online July 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Burnout Syndrome Common in Critical Care Professionals

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Critical care health care professionals have one of the highest rates of burnout syndrome (BOS), compared to other health care professionals, according to a call-to-action statement published in the July 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Post-MI Heart Failure Linked to Increased Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who develop heart failure after myocardial infarction may also face a higher risk of cancer, according to a study published in the July 19 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Many Adults 'Hoarding,' Self-Prescribing Antibiotics

TUESDAY, July 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- One in every 20 adults have used antibiotics without a doctor's guidance, according to a study published online July 11 in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

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Medication Organization Devices Tied to Adverse Effects

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Medication organization devices (MODs) may cause medication-related adverse events in unintentionally nonadherent older people, according to a study published online July 5 in Health Technology Assessment.

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Second, Unrelated Malignancies Strike 1 in 12 Cancer Patients

FRIDAY, July 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new study indicates that 8 percent of patients -- or one in 12 -- already diagnosed with one form of cancer will develop a second unrelated malignancy. The findings were published online July 5 in Cancer.

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Health Care Costs ~60 Percent Higher for Obese Preschoolers

FRIDAY, July 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to the health impacts of childhood obesity, there are major economic impacts, which may occur earlier than previously thought, according to research published online July 6 in Obesity.

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VA Appealing to Physicians to Join Agency

FRIDAY, July 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is appealing to physicians to join the agency as part of its recovery from a 2014 scandal linked to excessive wait times, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Nonsolid Nodules Unlikely to Cause Death in Lung Cancer

THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with lung cancer as the cause of death (COD), nonsolid nodules (NSNs) identified on computed tomography scans (CTs) tend to have an indolent course, according to a study published online July 5 in Radiology.

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Many Clinical Trials Are Not Listed in Data-Sharing Repository

WEDNESDAY, July 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Only about half of trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov are listed in the largest data-sharing repository, according to a research letter published online June 28 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Knowledge of CT Risks Varies Among Health Care Providers

FRIDAY, July 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Radiologists and technologists have better knowledge about the risks associated with medical imaging examinations than referring physicians, according to a study published online June 22 in the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences.

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U.S. Cancer Survivors Aging, Battling Other Chronic Disease

FRIDAY, July 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In 2016, nearly 62 percent of almost 16 million cancer survivors are aged 65 or older; and, by 2040, an estimated 73 percent of 26 million cancer survivors will be 65 or older, according to a report published in the July 1 issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Electronic Cigarettes May Damage Oral Epithelial Cells

FRIDAY, July 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Aerosols from electronic cigarettes appear cytotoxic to oral epithelial cells in vitro, according to research published online May 25 in PLOS ONE.

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Rehab in ICU for Respiratory Failure Does Not Reduce LOS

FRIDAY, July 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with acute respiratory failure, standardized rehabilitation therapy (SRT) does not decrease hospital length of stay (LOS) compared with usual care, according to a study published in the June 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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