July 2016 Briefing - Pediatrics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for July 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Early Mortality for Most Infants With Trisomy 13, 18

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early mortality is the most common outcome among children born with trisomy 13 or 18, although one-year survival is high for those undergoing surgical procedures, according to a study published online July 26 in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Breakeven Rate Estimated for Mid-Size Pediatric Practice

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The capitated payment breakeven rate has been calculated for a mid-size pediatric practice, with a breakeven per-member per-month (PMPM) rate of $24.10, according to research published online July 29 in Pediatrics.

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CDC Calls for Tighter Restrictions on Teen Nighttime Driving

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Getting U.S. teens out of the driver's seat before midnight would reduce their risk of fatal crashes, according to research published in the July 29 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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New Rule Tied to Fewer Head Impacts in High School Football

WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Limiting tackling during high school football practices lowers the risk of head impacts, according to a study published online June 22 in the Journal of Athletic Training.

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'Ice Bucket Challenge' Led to Significant ALS Gene Discovery

WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The hugely popular "Ice Bucket Challenge" funded a study that has discovered an important new amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) gene. The study, which involved more than 80 researchers in 11 countries, was published online July 25 in Nature Genetics.

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Six Years Average Time Between Onset and Diagnosis of Bipolar

WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The average delay to diagnosis of bipolar disorder is six years, according to a review published online July 26 in the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry.

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Review: Biofeedback Seems Effective for Pediatric Migraine

WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatric patients with migraine, biofeedback seems to be an effective intervention, according to a review published online July 26 in Pediatrics.

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Binge-Eating Disorders May Be Linked to Suicidality

WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adults and adolescents with binge-eating disorder (BED) may have increased risk of suicidality, according to research published online July 20 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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American Red Cross Says Blood Donations Needed Urgently

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The American Red Cross says it has an urgent need for blood donations, with less than a five-day supply of blood on hand to help those who need it.

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Teen Athletes at Low Risk for Opioid Addiction

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Teenage athletes are less likely to abuse opioids than adolescents who don't play sports or exercise, according to research published online July 25 in Pediatrics.

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Induced Labor Not Associated With Autism Risk

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Inducing labor won't raise a pregnant woman's risk of having a child with autism, according to a study published online July 25 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Marijuana Poisonings in Toddlers on the Rise in Colorado

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In 2014, Colorado and Washington became the first two states to legalize recreational marijuana. Shortly after, a sharp increase occurred in the number of Colorado children younger than 10 who became ill after being exposed to marijuana, according to a study published online July 25 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Medical Students Often Track Progress of Former Patients

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. medical students use electronic health records to track the progress of their former patients and confirm the accuracy of their diagnoses, according to research letter published online July 25 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Recent Increases in Rate of Hep C Detection in Young Women

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 2011 to 2014 there were increases in the rate of hepatitis C virus (HCV) detection among women of childbearing age, according to research published in the July 25 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Up to 1.6 Million Childbearing Women Possibly at Risk for Zika

MONDAY, July 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Up to 1.6 million childbearing women in Central and South America may be at risk for infection with the Zika virus by the end of the first phase of the epidemic, according to a letter published online July 25 in Nature Microbiology.

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'Walking Meetings' Feasible Strategy for Employee Wellness

MONDAY, July 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Converting a single weekly meeting to a walking meeting can help raise work-related physical activity levels of white-collar workers, according to a report published online June 23 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Another Non-Travel Related Case of Zika in Florida

FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Florida health officials say they're investigating a second possible case of locally transmitted Zika infection.

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Severe Hypoglycemia Linked to Mortality, CVD Events in T1DM

FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), severe hypoglycemia is associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to research published online July 6 in Diabetes Care.

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Local Hyperthermia Can Clear Molluscum Contagiosum Lesions

FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with molluscum contagiosum (MC) lesions, local hyperthermia with a targeted device is successful for lesion clearance, according to a research letter published online July 5 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Health Expenditures Rising for Middle Class, Wealthy

THURSDAY, July 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While overall U.S. medical spending growth slowed between 2004 and 2013, expenditures rose for middle- and high-income Americans, according to research published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

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Seropositivity of Meningitis B Vaccine Lower Than Expected

THURSDAY, July 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- About one-third of Princeton University students given a vaccine to combat a meningitis B outbreak on campus in 2013 didn't show signs of protection against the infection eight weeks later, according to a study published in the July 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Drug Shows Promise for Genetic Proopiomelanocortin Deficiency

THURSDAY, July 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug spurred substantial weight loss in patients with proopiomelanocortin (POMC) deficiency, according to a study published in the July 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Diabetes Rates for U.S. Teens Higher Than Previously Reported

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More American teens have diabetes or prediabetes than previously thought, and many don't know they have the condition, according to a research letter published in the July 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Possible Local Transmission of Zika Virus in Florida

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Florida health officials are investigating what could be the first case of locally transmitted Zika virus infection in the continental United States.

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Higher Education Linked to Reduced Post-MI Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) survivors with higher levels of education are less likely to develop heart failure, according to a study published online July 20 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

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ACS Endorses CDC's HPV Vaccine Guidelines

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The American Cancer Society has endorsed the U.S. government's HPV vaccination recommendations, which include immunizing all preteens against human papillomavirus (HPV). The report was published online July 19 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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Diabetes Meds Deemed Equal, but Metformin Still First-Line

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There are no significant differences in the associations between available glucose-lowering drugs (alone or in combination) and the risk of cardiovascular or all-cause mortality, according to a review published in the July 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Medicare Spending Up for Decedents Versus Survivors

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Medicare per capita spending was much higher for beneficiaries who died during 2014 than for those who survived the entire year, according to a report published by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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AAP Urges Awareness of Female Athlete Triad

TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should be aware of the "female athlete triad," which includes amenorrhea, osteoporosis, and disordered eating, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. The report was published online July 18 in Pediatrics.

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Proinsulin-to-C-Peptide Ratio Linked to Progression to T1DM

TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Elevation in the serum proinsulin-to-C-peptide (PI:C) ratio is associated with progression to type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online July 6 in Diabetes Care.

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Labor Compensation, Purchased Goods, Service Biggest Spends

TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Labor compensation remains the single largest contributor to costs among physicians' offices, hospitals, and outpatient care centers, according to a report published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

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Player-to-Player Hits in Football Up Magnitude of Head Impacts

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As officials at all levels of American football continue to debate how to prevent concussions, a new study, published online July 18 in Pediatrics, using data from devices inside the helmets of high school players confirms that hits with other players are especially damaging.

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Fracking Site Proximity May Affect Asthma Exacerbation Risk

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Living near fracking sites may lead to asthma exacerbations, according to a study published online July 18 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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AAP: Parents Need to Limit Kids' Exposure to Media Violence

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Media violence has become a routine part of the daily lives of American children, and parents, lawmakers, and the media should take steps to change that, according to a policy statement published online July 18 in Pediatrics.

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Burnout Can Have Acute Personal, Professional Consequences

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stress and burnout are increasingly prevalent among physicians, with serious personal and professional consequences, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Baseline Depression Symptoms Tied to Low Med Adherence

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Among clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, only baseline depressive symptoms are tied to low medication adherence in teen patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online June 28 in Diabetes Care.

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Biologic Response Modifier Use in Kids Ups Infectious Complications

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatric patients, the use of biologic response modifiers (BRMs) is associated with increased risk of infectious complications, according to a clinical report published online July 18 in Pediatrics.

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Growth in U.S. Health Spending Set to Average 5.8 Percent

FRIDAY, July 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Growth in U.S. health spending is expected to average 5.8 percent for 2015 to 2025, according to a study published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

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Increase in Acute Synthetic Cannabinoid Poisonings

FRIDAY, July 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Synthetic cannabinoids are sending increasing numbers of U.S. users to hospitals, according to research published in the July 15 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Supreme Court Ruling Could Impact Med School Admissions

THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling upholding the University of Texas at Austin's consideration of race and ethnicity in college admissions has implications for medical schools, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Intraocular Pressure Down With Anesthesia in Children

THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric patients undergoing general anesthesia have reductions in intraocular pressure (IOP), with the lowest IOP measured after induction of anesthesia, according to a study published online July 5 in Pediatric Anesthesia.

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Effects of APOE Gene May Be Apparent in Childhood

THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Variations in the APOE gene may start to show effects on brain structure and mental acuity as early as preschool, according to a study published online July 13 in Neurology.

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Differences in Salary for Male, Female Faculty Physicians

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For physicians with faculty appointments at 24 U.S. public medical schools there are significant salary differences between men and women, even after adjustment for confounding variables, according to a study published online July 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Epilepsy, Febrile Seizures in Childhood May Raise ADHD Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children who suffer from epilepsy or febrile seizures may face a higher risk of also having attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online July 13 in Pediatrics.

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Antibiotic Exposure Linked to Increased Odds of Child Obesity

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotic exposure is associated with increased odds of obesity among young children, according to a study published in the July issue of Gastroenterology.

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Childhood Thumb-Sucking, Nail-Biting May Reduce Allergies

TUESDAY, July 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children who suck their thumb or bite their nails past preschool age may be less prone to allergic reactions when they reach adolescence, according to research published online July 11 in Pediatrics.

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Rates of ASD Diagnosis Up With New Insurance Mandates

TUESDAY, July 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More U.S. children are getting diagnosed and treated for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in states that require commercial health insurers to cover these services, according to research published online July 11 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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FDA Approves Differin Gel for Over-the-Counter Use

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The once-daily acne treatment Differin Gel 0.1% (adapalene) has been approved for over-the-counter use among patients 12 and older, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said.

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Health Care Costs ~60 Percent Higher for Obese Preschoolers

FRIDAY, July 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to the health impacts of childhood obesity, there are major economic impacts, which may occur earlier than previously thought, according to research published online July 6 in Obesity.

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Retinoblastoma Mortality Up With Eye-Preserving Radiotherapy

FRIDAY, July 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Short-term survival of heritable retinoblastoma is high, but long-term mortality remains a challenge, according to a study published online July 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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VA Appealing to Physicians to Join Agency

FRIDAY, July 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is appealing to physicians to join the agency as part of its recovery from a 2014 scandal linked to excessive wait times, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Blood Test Might Help Diagnose Viral Versus Bacterial Infection

FRIDAY, July 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A blood test based on gene responses may help differentiate between bacterial and viral infections, according to a study published July 6 in Science Translational Medicine.

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CDC: Majority of HPV-Linked Cancers Are Preventable

FRIDAY, July 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of cancers linked to human papillomavirus (HPV) are preventable, according to a report published in the July 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Toys in Waiting Room May Be Source of Infection

THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Toys help spread the flu and other viruses because germs can survive on plastic surfaces for 24 hours or more, according to a study published recently in The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.

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Case Vignette Addresses Diagnosis, Management of PCOS

THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The diagnosis and management of polycystic ovary syndrome is discussed in a case vignette published online July 6 in The New England Journal of Medicine.

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Lab-Established Diagnosis Key for Persistent Diarrhea

THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Persistent diarrhea is typically caused by parasites or bacteria and requires accurate diagnosis in order to determine appropriate treatment, according to a review published online June 28 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Teen Girls at Highest Risk of Schoolbag-Linked Back Pain

WEDNESDAY, July 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent girls have the highest risk of suffering from intense back pain related to schoolbag use, according to a study published in the June issue of The Spine Journal.

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Several Factors Impact Parent Management of Child Postop Pain

WEDNESDAY, July 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Several factors impact parents' management of their children's postoperative pain at home, according to a study published online June 27 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Obesity Tied to Consumption of U.S. Subsidy Crops

WEDNESDAY, July 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Americans get more than half of their daily calories from seven farm foods that are subsidized by the U.S. government, but a new study suggests those subsidies may be contributing to the obesity epidemic. The findings were published online July 5 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Step-by-Step Approach Valid for Febrile Infants

WEDNESDAY, July 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Step-by-Step approach is valid for identifying febrile infants at risk for invasive bacterial infection (IBI), according to a study published online July 5 in Pediatrics.

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Genetic Risk Score Impact on BMI Varies Across Birth Cohorts

WEDNESDAY, July 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The magnitude of the association between a multilocus genetic risk score for body mass index (GRS-BMI) and BMI is larger for individuals born in later birth cohorts, according to a study published online July 5 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Many Clinical Trials Are Not Listed in Data-Sharing Repository

WEDNESDAY, July 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Only about half of trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov are listed in the largest data-sharing repository, according to a research letter published online June 28 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Mortality Odds Lower at Pediatric Trauma Centers for Injured Teens

TUESDAY, July 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For injured adolescents, treatment at pediatric trauma centers (PTCs) is associated with lower mortality compared with treatment at adult trauma centers (ATCs) or mixed trauma centers (MTCs) that treat both pediatric and adult trauma patients, according to a study published online June 27 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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CVD Risks Way Up in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

TUESDAY, July 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) have a significantly increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), according to research published online June 29 in Circulation.

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Variation in Workload for Pediatric Residents

TUESDAY, July 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is considerable variation in workload intensity among pediatric residents, according to a study published online June 29 in Pediatrics.

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Mindful Self-Compassion Program Beneficial in Diabetes

TUESDAY, July 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A mindful self-compassion (MSC) program can reduce depression, diabetes-specific distress, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in patients with diabetes, according to a study published online June 22 in Diabetes Care.

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Electronic Cigarettes May Damage Oral Epithelial Cells

FRIDAY, July 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Aerosols from electronic cigarettes appear cytotoxic to oral epithelial cells in vitro, according to research published online May 25 in PLOS ONE.

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Several Treatments Efficacious for Binge-Eating Disorder

FRIDAY, July 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients struggling with binge-eating disorder have several efficacious treatment options available, according to a review published online June 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Extended-Spectrum Antibiotics No Benefit for Pediatric Appendicitis

FRIDAY, July 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For children diagnosed with appendicitis undergoing appendectomy, extended-spectrum antibiotics seem to offer no advantage over narrower-spectrum agents, according to a study published online June 28 in Pediatrics.

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