July 2015 Briefing - Pediatrics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for July 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

CDC: Too Few U.S. Adolescents Getting HPV Vaccination

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Four out of 10 girls and six out of 10 boys, aged 13 to 17, have not started the recommended human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine series, according to survey results published in the July 31 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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AMA Wants Doctor Input on EHRs, Meaningful Use

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association (AMA) is encouraging clinicians to share their perspectives on electronic heath records (EHRs) and the meaningful use program.

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U.S. Health Spending Projected to Rise 5.8 Percent By 2024

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 2014 to 2024, U.S. health spending growth is projected to increase by about 6 percent, according to a report published online July 28 in Health Affairs.

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Inflammation Could Up Risk of Hearing Loss With Antibiotic

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Inflammation from bacterial infections may increase susceptibility to aminoglycoside-linked hearing impairment by increasing the uptake of the antibiotic into the inner ear, according to experimental research. The findings were published in the July 29 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Autism Spectrum Disorder Care Costs Could Top $500B by 2025

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The annual cost of caring for Americans with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) might reach $500 billion by 2025, with outside estimates approaching $1 trillion, according to a study published online July 17 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

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Doctors Perform First Double Hand Transplant in a Child

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A young Baltimore boy has two new transplanted hands to replace ones he lost to amputation five years ago, his doctors announced Tuesday.

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Probiotic Supplements May Help Prevent Infantile Eczema

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Probiotic supplementation in pregnancy and early infancy can prevent infantile eczema, according to a review and meta-analysis published online July 21 in Allergy.

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Patients Report Improved Care Access, Better Health With ACA

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Millions more Americans have affordable health insurance, access to a personal doctor, and feel they are in better health following the first two open-enrollment periods of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a new analysis shows. The results are published in the July 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Nasal Balloon Can Treat Otitis Media With Effusion

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A nasal balloon can effectively treat otitis media with effusion in children, preventing unnecessary and ineffective treatment with antibiotics, according to a new study published online July 27 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Study Developed to Track Pediatricians' Experiences

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A longitudinal study that will track the personal and professional experiences of early-career pediatricians has been developed. The details are published online July 27 in Pediatrics.

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Neonatal Intensive Care May Be Overused

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More infants are being treated in neonatal intensive care units at many U.S. hospitals, and the infants are bigger and less premature, suggesting potential overuse of the resource, according to a study published online July 27 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Delays Noted in the Reporting of Serious Patient Harms to FDA

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 10 percent of cases where a drug does serious harm are not reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration within the required 15-day period, according to a new analysis published online July 27 as a research letter in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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New Gene Test Speeds Diagnosis of Enterovirus D68

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have developed a genetic test to quickly detect enterovirus D68 (EV-D68). The researchers published details of the test's techniques online recently in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.

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Self-Reported Eczema Valid for Detecting Atopic Dermatitis

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Self- and caregiver-reported history of eczema is valid for identifying atopic dermatitis (AD), according to a study published online July 17 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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No Need for More Propofol for MRI Sedation in ADHD

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) undergoing sedation for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) do not have a higher dose requirement for propofol, according to a study published online July 22 in Pediatric Anesthesia.

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Expansion of High-Deductible Plans to Impact Physician Care

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As a result of the increasing popularity of high-deductible health care plans, patients now have more financial responsibility for medical services, which is impacting physician practices, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Human Breast Milk Effective for Atopic Dermatitis in Infants

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Topical application of human breast milk (HBM) is effective for infants with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis, according to a study published in the August issue of the International Journal of Dermatology.

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Evidence of Cellular Damage From Computed Tomography

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cellular damage occurs when people undergo computed tomography (CT) scans, but whether or not this causes cancer or any other health problems is unclear, according to a study published online July 22 in the JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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CDC: Stillbirths Now Outnumber Infant Deaths in U.S.

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stillbirths have eclipsed infant deaths for the first time in the United States, according to new research published in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's July 23 National Vital Statistics Report.

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CDC: U.S. Teens Waiting Longer to Have Sex

WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than half of U.S. teenagers aged 15 to 19 are having sex, a rate dramatically lower than it was a quarter-century ago, according to a July data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Two Trajectories of Childhood Growth for Type 2 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two trajectories of growth correlate with development of type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Antibiotic Use Linked to Higher Odds of Juvenile Arthritis

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotic use may increase the risk of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), according to research published online July 20 in Pediatrics.

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Antibiotic Misconceptions Still Common Among Parents

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many American parents still have misconceptions about when their children should receive antibiotics and what the medications do, a new study indicates. The findings were published online July 20 in Pediatrics.

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The Top Five Unnecessary Tests, Treatments in Newborn Medicine

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The top five unnecessary tests and treatments have been identified in newborn medicine, according to an article published online July 20 in Pediatrics.

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Clinical Signs of Citrin Deficiency Mimic Anorexia Nervosa

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The clinical features of citrin deficiency (CD) may mimic those of anorexia nervosa (AN), according to a case report published online July 20 in Pediatrics.

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U.S. E. coli O157 Outbreaks Mainly Due to Food

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Outbreaks of Shiga toxin-producing bacterium Escherichia coli O157 infection are mainly caused by food, especially beef and leafy vegetables, according to a study published in the August issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Clinicians May Harbor Biases About Sexual Orientation

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians may be biased when it comes to the sexual orientation of patients, new research suggests. The study was published online July 16 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Trend Alert: Sunburn 'Art' Growing Presence on Social Media

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Experts are speaking out against "sunburn art," a new social media trend in which people use stencils or strategically applied sunblock to create a do-it-yourself temporary sunburn tattoo on their bodies.

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Weight Disqualifies 1 in 3 Young Adults From U.S. Military

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One-third of young adults in the United States are too overweight to be in the military, according to a report from a group of retired military leaders.

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AMA Suggests Ways to Encourage Use of Patient Portals

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Measures can be taken to encourage patients to use patient portals to help ensure practices meet current Stage 2 meaningful use requirements, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Choosing Wisely: How to Implement in Clinical Practice

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies should be adopted to help with implementation of the Choosing Wisely program, which was designed to address the problem of medical overuse, according to an article published in the July/August issue of Family Practice Management.

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Few U.S. States Mandate Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Almost a decade after the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was first recommended for girls, only two U.S. states and Washington, D.C., require the immunization, according to a research letter published in the July 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Hospital Volume Impacts Peds Post-Urologic Op Complications

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatric patients hospitalized for urological procedures, the risk of postoperative complications is increased at non-high volume hospitals, according to research published in the August issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Body Contact of Players Blamed for Most Soccer Concussions

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While many experts have called for a ban on "heading" the ball in youth soccer because they believe it is a leading cause of concussions, a new study suggests the body contact that often occurs during such play is to blame for most brain injuries. The findings were published online July 13 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Caution: Increasing Trend of Foraging for Mushrooms

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mistaking toxic mushrooms for edible ones is common and sometimes deadly, researchers warn in an article published online July 13 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Progress in Reporting Conflict of Interest Among IRB Members

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among institutional review board (IRB) members, there has been positive progress in the reporting and management of conflicts of interest, according to a study published online July 13 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Arts Observation Curriculum May Be Beneficial for Medical Students

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of an arts observation curriculum can help students learn to observe objectively and articulate their observations, which are important traits for clinical practice, according to an article published online July 3 in Academic Medicine.

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Alcohol Use Appears to Impair Driving More Than Cannabis Use

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking alcohol appears to negatively affect driving skills to a greater extent than smoking cannabis, according to research findings published online June 23 in Drug and Alcohol Dependence. And, combined use leads to greater behind-the-wheel impairment, but it doesn't double the effect.

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Second Severe Allergic Reaction Within Hours Isn't Uncommon

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 15 percent of children who have a severe allergic reaction can have a second one within a few hours, according to a new study published online June 22 in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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More Specific Newborn Names Could Help Reduce Medical Errors

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Using more specific names for newborns may reduce hospital mix-ups by about a third, according to research published online July 13 in Pediatrics.

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Health Care Providers May Be Missing Signs of Child Abuse

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. hospitals are missing opportunities to detect physical abuse in infants and toddlers, according to research published online July 13 in Pediatrics.

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Many Overweight Teens Don't See Their Weight As a Problem

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many overweight and obese teens don't believe they have a weight problem, according to a study published online July 9 in the International Journal of Obesity.

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CDC: Most Americans in Favor of Raising Legal Smoking Age to 21

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Three-quarters of American adults favor raising the legal smoking age to 21, according to a report published online July 6 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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IGF2 Variant Affects Prenatal and Postnatal Growth

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An IGF2 variant (c.191C→A, p.Ser64Ter) affects postnatal as well as prenatal growth among those who have inherited the variant through paternal transmission, according to a report published online July 8 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Farm-Related Immunoregulation Tied to Dendritic Cell Subset

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lower levels of circulating myeloid dendritic cell subtype 2 (mDC2) in children who live on farms may contribute to a protective effect against asthma, according to research published online June 27 in Allergy.

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Poll Finds More Parents See Benefits, Safety of Vaccines

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- American parents' views about childhood vaccines became more favorable over the past year, a new poll indicates.

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Asbestos Found in Children's Crayons, Toy Crime Lab Kits

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Asbestos fibers have been found in crayons and other toys sold in the United States, according to a new report from an environmental health advocacy group.

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ACIP Recommends MenB Vaccine for 16- to 23-Year-Olds

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has voted to issue a category B recommendation for use of two serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccines in patients aged 16 to 23 years for short-term disease prevention, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians.

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PCV13 Predicted to Be Cost Saving Versus PCV7

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV-13) is expected to be cost saving compared with PCV7, according to a study published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

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Increasing Health Care Burden for Pediatric Pulmonary HTN

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There is an increasing health care burden associated with morbidity and mortality of pediatric pulmonary hypertension (PH), according to a study published online July 6 in Pediatrics.

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USPSTF: Evidence Lacking for Speech, Language Screening

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has concluded that the current evidence is insufficient to weigh the benefits and harms of screening for speech and language delays in children aged younger than 5 years. The final recommendation statement has been published online July 7 in Pediatrics.

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Court Upholds Medical Liability Damages Cap

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The non-economic damages cap under the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act (MICRA) has been upheld again in a California court of appeal, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Despite Risk to Patients, Health Providers Often Work While Sick

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many health care professionals work when they are sick, putting their patients at risk for serious illness or even death, according to a study published online July 6 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Adolescent Lifestyle Not Strongly Tied to Later Muscular Pain

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adverse health behaviors in adolescence are only moderately associated with later musculoskeletal pain in adulthood, according to a study published in the June issue of Pain Medicine.

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Case Study: Vitamin K Deficiency Result of Vaccine Refusal

THURSDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fussy infants with unexplained bruising or bleeding may have late-onset vitamin K-deficient bleeding (VKDB) as a result of parental refusal of the vitamin K injection at birth, according to a case report published in the July issue of the Journal of Emergency Medicine.

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Endurance Athletes Should Only Drink When Thirsty, Experts Say

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes should listen to their body and drink water only when thirsty to prevent exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) or "water intoxication." The new guidelines were developed at the International Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia Consensus Development Conference in Carlsbad, Calif., and published in the July issue of the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine.

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Additional Years of Secondary Schooling Can Cut HIV Risk

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Additional years of secondary schooling provide a cost-effective HIV prevention measure in Botswana, according to a study published online June 28 in The Lancet Global Health.

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Antipsychotic Use Up for Teens, Young Adults From 2006 to 2010

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 2006 to 2010 there was an increase in antipsychotic medication use among adolescents and young adults, according to a study published online July 1 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Obese Teen Girls Less Likely to Use Contraception

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is associated with less frequent and less consistent contraceptive use among sexually active 18- to 19-year-old girls, according to research published online July 1 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Public Opinion Sought on New Licensure for Assistant Physicians

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New classification of licensure for assistant physicians has been created, and public opinion is being sought by the Missouri State Board of Registration for the Healing Arts prior to filing these rules with the Secretary of State's Office and the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules.

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Sublingual Immunotherapy Offers Little Benefit for Grass Allergy

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The benefit of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) over placebo for seasonal grass pollen allergies is small, according to new research published online June 29 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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