July 2015 Briefing - Internal Medicine

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Internal Medicine for July 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

CDC: 20 Percent of U.S. Adults Have a Disability

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than 50 million Americans live with a physical or mental disability, according to research published in the July 31 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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FDA Warns of Confusion Between Brintellix, Brilinta

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Confusion between the names of the antidepressant Brintellix (vortioxetine) and the antiplatelet Brilinta (ticagrelor) has led to the wrong medication being prescribed or dispensed, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

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Treatment Targets Not Met by Most Older Patients With Diabetes

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only one-third of American seniors with diabetes have their disease under control as defined by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines, according to research published in the July issue of the Diabetes Care.

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Targeted Exercises Can Boost Men's Bone Health

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Resistance and "jump" training can improve bone health in moderately active middle-aged men with osteopenia, according to a small new study. The findings were published online July 16 in Bone.

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AMA Wants Doctor Input on EHRs, Meaningful Use

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association (AMA) is encouraging clinicians to share their perspectives on electronic heath records (EHRs) and the meaningful use program.

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Accuracy, Timing of Pre-Op Lung CA Evaluation Can Be Improved

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For suspected lung cancer patients, the thoroughness, accuracy, and timeliness of preoperative evaluation could be improved, according to research published online July 30 in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Social Media Can Inform Patient-Doctor Dialogue About LVADs

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Social media outlets represent a promising source of information relating to left ventricular assist device treatment for heart failure, but their reliability is hampered by current lack of oversight into content, according to a study published online July 28 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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U.S. Health Spending Projected to Rise 5.8 Percent By 2024

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 2014 to 2024, U.S. health spending growth is projected to increase by about 6 percent, according to a report published online July 28 in Health Affairs.

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'Thrifty Phenotype' Leads to Less Weight Loss in Obese

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For obese individuals, energy expenditure during fasting and response to overfeeding predict weight loss in response to caloric restriction, according to a study published in the August issue of Diabetes.

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Test Set Performance Indicators Correlate Well With Clinical Audit

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some performance indicators for mammography test sets are associated with aspects of clinical audit parameters, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology.

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Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Seem Safe in CML With CKD

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) appear to be safe in patients with chronic-phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to a study published online July 28 in Cancer.

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U.K. Study: Alcohol Use Tied to Less Disability in Chronic Pain

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate to heavy drinking might cut the likelihood of disability for people with chronic widespread pain such as that related to fibromyalgia, according to new research published online July 20 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Recalcitrant Back Pain Could Be Vertebral Osteomyelitis

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Vertebral osteomyelitis should be considered in cases of back or neck pain unresponsive to conservative measures and elevated inflammatory markers with or without fever, according to new guidelines from the Infectious Disease Society of America published online July 29 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Inflammation Could Up Risk of Hearing Loss With Antibiotic

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Inflammation from bacterial infections may increase susceptibility to aminoglycoside-linked hearing impairment by increasing the uptake of the antibiotic into the inner ear, according to experimental research. The findings were published in the July 29 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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New Drug Effectively Lowers Levels of Triglycerides

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug, ISIS 304801, can lower triglyceride levels by as much as 71 percent, according to study results published in the July 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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U.S. Medical Groups Fighting Prescription Opioid Abuse

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Led by the American Medical Association (AMA), a group of 27 major U.S. medical organizations are banding together to tackle the continuing epidemic of opioid abuse.

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Telomere Length May Help Predict Lung Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with long telomeres are at increased risk for lung adenocarcinoma but not other types of cancer, according to a study published online July 2 in Human Molecular Genetics.

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Home-Based Device Beneficial for Obese Patients With Knee OA

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For obese individuals, a novel, biomechanical, home-based gait-training device is associated with improvements in gait parameters at three and 12 months, according to a study published online July 28 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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Chocolate Consumption Shows No Impact on Risk of A-Fib

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among U.S. male physicians, chocolate consumption is not associated with risk of incident atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a study published in the Aug. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Tamsulosin Could Help Passage of Larger Kidney Stones

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Tamsulosin can boost the passage of large kidney stones, but not small ones, according to a study published online July 17 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Higher Risk for Depression With Psoriasis

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There is an increased risk of depression among women with psoriasis, according to a study published online July 17 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Docs Report Patient Safety Often at Risk in ER to Inpatient Handoff

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians report that patient safety is often at risk during the emergency department admission handoff process due to ineffective communication. The findings were published online July 22 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Similar Adverse Effects Seen for St. John's Wort, Fluoxetine

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adverse reactions to St. John's wort are similar to those reported for fluoxetine, according to research published in the July issue of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology.

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Outcomes Equal for Continuous, Intermittent β-Lactams in Sepsis

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Continuous and intermittent administration of β-lactam antibiotics are similarly efficacious for patients with severe sepsis, according to a study published online July 22 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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RAPID Score Validated for Prognosis of Pleural Infections

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The recently developed RAPID score, which identifies the risk of mortality in patients with pleural infections based on five clinical factors, has been validated in a diverse patient cohort. The findings have been published online July 20 in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Early Invasive Strategy No Benefit 10 Years After NSTE-ACS

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS), routine early invasive strategy (coronary arteriography and myocardial revascularization, as clinically indicated) is not associated with improved outcomes at 10 years over a selective invasive strategy (coronary arteriography for recurrent ischemia only). The findings were published in the Aug. 4 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Low Incidence of Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Canagliflozin

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For canagliflozin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes, the incidence of serious adverse events of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is low, according to research published online July 22 in Diabetes Care.

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FDA Approves Balloon Device to Treat Obesity

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The ReShape Integrated Dual Balloon System has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to combat adult obesity. Inflated inside the stomach, the device appears to create a sense of fullness, although how it works isn't completely understood, the FDA said in a news release.

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Routine Dyspnea Severity Assessment Could Aid Care

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of hospitalists believe that routinely assessing dyspnea severity would enhance their clinical decision making and positively affect patient care, according to a study published online July 20 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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2015 MOC Program Expected to Cost $5.7 Billion Over 10 Years

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The 2015 version of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) maintenance-of-certification (MOC) program is expected to generate considerable costs, mainly due to physician time costs, according to research published online July 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Patients Report Improved Care Access, Better Health With ACA

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Millions more Americans have affordable health insurance, access to a personal doctor, and feel they are in better health following the first two open-enrollment periods of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a new analysis shows. The results are published in the July 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Mortality, Hospital Stays, Costs All Down Among U.S. Seniors

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Between 1999 and 2013, yearly mortality and hospitalization rates steadily declined among Americans in the traditional fee-for-service Medicare program. Meanwhile, spending on inpatient care showed the same pattern. The findings were published in the July 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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ASCO Calls for Cancer Trials to Include More Seniors

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a position statement published online July 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, the American Society of Clinical Oncology has called on the U.S. government and the cancer research community to broaden clinical trials to include older adults.

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Not Resecting Ideal Candidates Ups Mortality in Liver Cancer

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), not resecting ideal candidates for resection is associated with increased mortality, according to a study published in the Aug. 1 issue of Hepatology.

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USPSTF: Screen All Adults for Depression in Primary Care

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In an updated draft recommendation released Monday, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force urges that primary care physicians regularly screen for depression in all adult patients (B recommendation).

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Visit-to-Visit BP Variability May Impact Cardiovascular Outcomes

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Wide blood pressure fluctuations may signal an increased risk of coronary heart disease and early death, according to research published online July 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Components of Mediterranean Lifestyle Cut Postprandial Lipemia

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Components of the Mediterranean lifestyle may reduce postprandial lipemia (PPL), an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, according to a review published online July 7 in the American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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Not All Placebos Are Equal in Knee Osteoarthritis

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Not all placebos are equally effective for knee osteoarthritis and some can trigger clinically relevant responses, according to a review published online July 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Atorvastatin/Ezetimibe Beats Atorvastatin After PCI

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For Japanese patients who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), atorvastatin plus ezetimibe is associated with improved outcomes versus atorvastatin alone, according to a study published in the Aug. 4 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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2008 Initiative Had Minimal Impact on Pressure Ulcer Charges

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The 2008 Hospital-Acquired Conditions Initiative (HACI) payment changes for pressure ulcers have had a minimal effect, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Higher Health Costs for Diabetes Mainly Meds, Inpatient Care

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 2002 to 2012, individuals with diabetes had consistently higher health expenditure compared to those without diabetes, according to a study published online July 22 in Diabetes Care.

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FDA Approves Praluent for Certain Cases of High Cholesterol

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Praluent (alirocumab) injection has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in addition to diet and maximally tolerated statin therapy in adults with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia or clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, who need additional low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol reduction.

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35% of Colorectal Cancers in Patients Age ≤35 Are Genetic

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than a third of colorectal cancers diagnosed in younger patients are caused by inherited gene mutations, according to a study published online July 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Delays Noted in the Reporting of Serious Patient Harms to FDA

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 10 percent of cases where a drug does serious harm are not reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration within the required 15-day period, according to a new analysis published online July 27 as a research letter in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Beetroot Juice Supplementation May Help Lengthen Workouts

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic supplementation with beetroot juice (BRJ), containing nitrate, has beneficial effects on the work of the heart in response to exercise, according to a study published online June 17 in the American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

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Risk of Death Up With Lower Extremity Amputation in Diabetes

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with diabetes and a lower extremity amputation (LEA) are more likely to die, with some of the increased risk due to diabetes-related complications, according to a study published online July 22 in Diabetes Care.

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AAFP: Pay Primary Care Doctors for Inpatient Consulting

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Insurance companies should consider reviewing coverage policies to include situations where primary care physicians provide important and cost-saving inpatient consulting, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

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Earlier Physical Therapy May Help Older Patients With Back Pain

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults presenting to their primary care providers with a new visit for back pain, early referral to physical therapy (PT) services results in no clinically meaningful differences in outcomes; however, the extent of improvement in symptoms may be greater, according to a study published in the Aug. 1 issue of The Spine Journal.

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Improved Care Transitions Needed Post Ambulatory Surgery

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients age 70 or older are at greater risk of unanticipated hospital admission within 30 days of ambulatory surgery, even after adjusting for comorbidities, according to a study published online July 22 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Self-Reported Eczema Valid for Detecting Atopic Dermatitis

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Self- and caregiver-reported history of eczema is valid for identifying atopic dermatitis (AD), according to a study published online July 17 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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One-Third of Septic Shock Survivors Readmitted

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About one-third of survivors of sepsis or septic shock are readmitted within 30 days, according to a study published online July 20 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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CDC Revisits Marijuana-Linked Death in Colorado

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials on Thursday revisited the first reported marijuana-linked death in Colorado since voters there legalized recreational use of the drug in 2012.

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Oncologists Offer Strategies for Reducing Cost of Cancer Drugs

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Soaring costs for cancer drugs are detrimental to patient care in the United States, say a group of oncologists. Recommendations on how to address the problem are presented in a commentary piece published online July 23 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Progress Reported in Treatment of Marburg Virus

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've made preliminary progress toward developing a drug that one day may treat people infected with the Marburg virus, which is similar to Ebola. The study was published in the July 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Chemotherapy Use Doesn't Improve QOL Near Death

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with end-stage cancer, chemotherapy use does not improve quality of life near death (QOD), even for those with good performance status, according to a study published online July 23 in JAMA Oncology.

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'Driving Straight' May Be Suitable Road Test in Dementia

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Drivers with dementia who have more difficulties driving straight and making left and right turns are more likely to fail road testing, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Expansion of High-Deductible Plans to Impact Physician Care

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As a result of the increasing popularity of high-deductible health care plans, patients now have more financial responsibility for medical services, which is impacting physician practices, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Evidence of Cellular Damage From Computed Tomography

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cellular damage occurs when people undergo computed tomography (CT) scans, but whether or not this causes cancer or any other health problems is unclear, according to a study published online July 22 in the JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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Adherence to Stroke Guidelines Overestimated by Hospitals

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. hospitals overestimate their ability to provide fast delivery of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to stroke patients, according to a study published online July 22 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Pharmacological Prophylaxis Doesn't Cut VTE in Cirrhosis

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Pharmacological thromboprophylaxis does not reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cirrhosis, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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PTSD Symptoms Persist for Thousands of Vietnam Vets

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than a quarter-million Vietnam veterans suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms today, four decades after the war's end, a new study estimates. And at least one-third of them have major depression as well. The findings were published online July 22 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Sleep Apnea Tied to Increased Risk of Panic Disorder

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea seems to be associated with increased risk of subsequent panic disorder, according to a study published in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Fluoroquinolones Halt Multidrug-Resistant-TB in Contacts

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For contacts of individuals with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), fluoroquinolone (FQN) therapy is associated with health system savings and reduced mortality, according to a study published in the July 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Short Sleep Duration Ups Odds of Metabolic Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Short sleep duration (less than seven hours) is associated with increased likelihood of metabolic syndrome, according to a meta-analysis published online July 13 in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy Unclear at Low Glycemic Range

WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The accuracy of blood glucose meters (BGMs) in the low glycemic range is questionable, according to an observation letter published online July 15 in Diabetes Care.

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~40 Percent Undergo Stress Testing After PCI in VA System

WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system, nearly 40 percent of patients undergo stress testing in the two years following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to a study published online July 21 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Glitazone Usage Tied to Lower Risk for Parkinson's Disease

WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of glitazones may help protect against Parkinson's disease, according to new research published online July 21 in PLOS Medicine.

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No Link Found Between Testosterone Therapy and VTE

WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Testosterone therapy doesn't appear to increase the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to a study published online July 20 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Bystander CPR Tied to Boosts in Survival Rates

WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many lives could be saved if more people performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) immediately after seeing someone go into cardiac arrest, a new study contends. The report was published in the July 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Antibiotic May Reduce Anticoagulant Effect of Warfarin

WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The antibiotic dicloxacillin may lessen the effects of vitamin K antagonists, according to research published in the July 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Pioglitazone Not Significantly Associated With Bladder Cancer

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Despite smaller, prior studies suggesting that pioglitazone might raise users' risk of bladder cancer, a large new study finds no statistically significant association. The research was published in the July 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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2009 Pap Guidelines Linked to Drop in Chlamydia Testing

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A major change in Papanicolaou (Pap) test guidelines introduced in 2009 may have had an unintended consequence: Some young women are missing out on screening for chlamydia, according to a report published in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Care Transitions Increasingly Important for Outpatient Doctors

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The divide between outpatient and inpatient medicine seems to be growing, highlighting the importance of managing care transitions as an outpatient-only physician, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Targeted Prophylaxis Effective in Post-Prostate Biopsy Sepsis

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing transrectal prostate biopsy, targeted prophylaxis is similarly effective to empirical prophylaxis for prevention of post-biopsy sepsis, according to a study published in the August issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Computerized System Almost Completely Cuts Medical Errors

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Over five years, a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system can reduce medical errors (MEs), with no new type of errors detected, according to a study published online July 14 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Inadequate Adherence for Proper Removal of Protective Gear

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many health care workers do not remove personal protective equipment (PPE) correctly, according to a brief report published in the July 1 issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Race May Factor Into Higher Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks are more likely than whites to experience sudden cardiac arrest and it often occurs at an earlier age in blacks than in whites, according to research published online July 20 in Circulation.

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CDC: Aspirin Use Common Among Americans With Heart Disease

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About seven in 10 Americans with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) or stroke regularly take aspirin, according to a report published in the July 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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ASCO Guidelines: Biomarker Use in Metastatic Breast CA Treatment

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Biomarkers can be used to guide decisions on systemic therapy for women with metastatic breast cancer, according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published online July 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Six-Minute Walk Test Predictive for Pulmonary Hypertension

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The six-minute walk (6MW) stress echocardiography test is prognostic for development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in connective tissue disease (CTD), according to a study published in the July 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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USPSTF: More Evidence Needed for Visual Acuity Screening

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has concluded that there is currently insufficient evidence to assess the benefits and harms of screening for impaired visual acuity in older adults. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement based on an evidence review published online July 20 by the USPSTF.

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Patients Not Talking About Using Alternative Therapies for Pain

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many Americans with chronic pain who use alternative therapies -- such as acupuncture -- don't discuss these treatments with their doctors, new research finds. The study was published online July 20 in the American Journal of Managed Care.

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Article Answers Reader Questions About Coding

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Reader questions about coding a new evaluation and management (E/M) with modifier 25 and codes for three-dimensional (3D) mammograms are answered in an article published in Medical Economics.

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Intervention Can Improve Appropriateness of Telemetry Use

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A hospitalist-driven intervention to improve appropriate use of telemetry can reduce length of stay and costs, according to a study published online July 7 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Autoimmune Risk Up for Relatives of Those With Celiac Disease

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- First-degree relatives and spouses of those with celiac disease have increased risk for nonceliac autoimmune disease, according to a study published in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Extensive Nonadherence to Vaccine Guidelines in Diabetes

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with diabetes, considered to be at increased risk of infection and infectious complications, there is considerable nonadherence to national guidelines for hepatitis B, influenza, and 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines, according to a study published in the July issue of Clinical Diabetes.

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Prostate Cancer Interacts With Comorbidity to Increase VTE Rate

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For men with prostate cancer (PC), the rate of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is increased with high comorbidity, according to a study published online July 6 in Cancer.

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BMI Doesn't Affect Kidney Transplant Survival

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing kidney transplantation, survival is unaffected by body mass index (BMI), according to a study published online July 3 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Macrolide-Resistant M. pneumoniae in All U.S. Regions

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) has a prevalence of 13.2 percent in a sample of M. pneumoniae-positive specimens from six locations in the United States, according to a study published in the August issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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U.S. E. coli O157 Outbreaks Mainly Due to Food

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Outbreaks of Shiga toxin-producing bacterium Escherichia coli O157 infection are mainly caused by food, especially beef and leafy vegetables, according to a study published in the August issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Clinicians May Harbor Biases About Sexual Orientation

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians may be biased when it comes to the sexual orientation of patients, new research suggests. The study was published online July 16 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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CMS May Adopt Doctors' Calls for End-of-Life Counseling

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A proposed rule from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) would implement physicians' calls to pay for end-of-life counseling, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Most Obese Patients Never Reach a Healthy Weight

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Weight loss is considered a major health goal for people who are obese, but the reality is that few reach a normal weight or keep any lost pounds off, according to a study published online July 16 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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More Radiation Doesn't Up Survival in Low-Risk Prostate CA

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher doses of radiation may improve survival in men with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancers, but it does not do the same for those with low-risk disease, according to a study published online July 16 in JAMA Oncology.

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Increasing Aerobic Exercise Rx Benefits Older Women

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doubling the recommended weekly exercise amount may help postmenopausal women lose significantly more body fat, according to research findings reported online July 16 in JAMA Oncology.

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CDC: ACA May Have Boosted Uptake of Preventive Care

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Americans are up to three times more likely to receive preventive care if they have health insurance, federal officials reported Thursday. And people paying for private insurance received the same preventive care as people on Medicaid or Medicare, according to the findings published in the July 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Treats Tinnitus

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can improve tinnitus severity, according to a study published online July 16 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

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CVD Risk Similar for Metformin + Insulin or Sulfonylureas

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke is similar for treatment with insulin or sulfonylureas in combination with metformin, according to a study published online July 14 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Universal Health Literacy Precautions Recommended

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Universal health literacy precautions should be used to provide understandable information for all patients, according to an article published in the July 15 issue of American Family Physician.

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Many Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Cases Upgraded at Prostatectomy

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many clinically low-risk prostate cancer patients are upgraded at prostatectomy, according to a study published in the August issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Carotid Fluoro-2-Doxyglucose Uptake Predicts CV Events

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For asymptomatic adults, carotid fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake is a predictor of cardio-cerebrovascular events, according to a study published online July 15 in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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AMA Suggests Ways to Encourage Use of Patient Portals

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Measures can be taken to encourage patients to use patient portals to help ensure practices meet current Stage 2 meaningful use requirements, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Wildfires Can Trigger Acute Coronary Events for Miles Around

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Wildfires create air pollution that fuels the risk for cardiovascular events, especially in older adults, researchers report in the July issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Weight Disqualifies 1 in 3 Young Adults From U.S. Military

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One-third of young adults in the United States are too overweight to be in the military, according to a report from a group of retired military leaders.

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Trend Alert: Sunburn 'Art' Growing Presence on Social Media

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Experts are speaking out against "sunburn art," a new social media trend in which people use stencils or strategically applied sunblock to create a do-it-yourself temporary sunburn tattoo on their bodies.

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Genes May Be Key to a Better HIV Vaccine

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An individual's genetic makeup may determine whether an HIV vaccine will work, a new study suggests. The findings were published in the July 15 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Antibodies to Serum Amyloid P Deplete Amyloid Deposits

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with systemic amyloidosis, treatment with (R)-1-[6-[(R)-2-carboxy-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-6-oxo-hexanoyl]pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (CPHPC) followed by an anti-serum amyloid P component (SAP) efficiently depletes amyloid load in the liver and kidney, according to a study published online July 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Geographic Expansion of High-Risk Areas for Lyme Disease

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 1993 to 2012 there has been geographic expansion of high-risk areas for Lyme disease, according to a study published online July 15 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Standing Work May Have Long-Term Health Consequences

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Standing work is associated with increased muscle fatigue, according to a study published online June 5 in Human Factors.

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Early Healthy Eating Intervention in Pregnancy Helps Obese Women

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A healthy eating (HE) intervention is associated with lower gestational weight gain (GWG) and fasting glucose than a physical activity (PA) intervention, according to a study published online June 25 in Diabetes Care.

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Failed Communication Associated With Readmission

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Failed communication attempts are associated with readmission among Medicare beneficiaries with congestive heart failure, although the correlation is no longer significant after adjustment for other variables, according to a study published online June 26 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Written Reflections Offer Insight Into Physician Communication

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Common themes relating to patient communication have been identified in physicians' written reflections, according to research published online July 6 in the Journal of Health Communication.

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Choosing Wisely: How to Implement in Clinical Practice

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies should be adopted to help with implementation of the Choosing Wisely program, which was designed to address the problem of medical overuse, according to an article published in the July/August issue of Family Practice Management.

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Coronary Artery Calcium Score Has Long-Term Prognostic Utility

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A zero coronary artery calcium (CAC) score has long-term prognostic utility, with CAC presence an independent predictor of mortality, according to a study published online July 15 in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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Antidepressant+NSAID May Raise Risk of Intracranial Hemorrhage

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Of more than four million people prescribed a first-time antidepressant, those who also used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) had a higher risk of intracranial hemorrhage within the next month. The findings were published online July 14 in The BMJ.

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Breast CA Survivors Gain More Weight Than Cancer-Free Peers

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among women with a family history of breast cancer, breast cancer survivors tend to gain more weight than women who are free of the disease, new research suggests. The study was published online July 15 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Guidelines Updated for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Treatment

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) treatment have been updated by an international group of respiratory societies. The updated clinical practice guideline was published in the July 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Smartphone Data Might Help Identify Symptoms of Depression

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Smartphone data may be useful in identification of symptoms of depression, according to research published online July 15 in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

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New Guidelines Deemed Better for Identifying Statin Candidates

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Updated guidelines for cholesterol management were released in 2013 by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA). Now, a new report indicates they are more accurate and efficient than earlier guidelines in identifying adults at high risk for cardiovascular events who could benefit from statins. The findings are published in the July 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Few U.S. States Mandate Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Almost a decade after the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was first recommended for girls, only two U.S. states and Washington, D.C., require the immunization, according to a research letter published in the July 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Considerable Burden for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The annual incidence of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization is 24.8 cases per 10,000 adults, according to a study published online July 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Leisure Time Sitting Linked to Increased Risk of Specific Cancers

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of time spent sitting may increase a woman's odds for cancer, particularly multiple myeloma, breast, and ovarian cancers, according to a study published online June 30 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Patiromer Treats Hyperkalemia in Diabetic Kidney Disease

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug, patiromer, decreases serum potassium levels in patients with hyperkalemia and diabetic kidney disease, according to the results of a phase 2 study published in the July 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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High Doses of Antibiotic Ups Risk of Over-Anticoagulation

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among hospitalized patients, high-dose amoxicillin/clavulanate correlates with increased risk of over-anticoagulation when combined with warfarin, according to a study published online July 2 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Metoclopramide Nasal Spray Helps Gastroparesis in Women

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women, but not men, with diabetes, metoclopramide nasal spray reduces symptoms of gastroparesis, according to a study published in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Colectomy May Beat Medical Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Colectomy may extend the lives of older adults with ulcerative colitis, new research suggests. The study was published online July 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Climate Change Could Be Affecting Mortality Rates Now

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that U.S. climate change, and the unpredictable temperature swings it can bring, may be affecting mortality rates in seniors. The findings appear in a research letter published online July 13 in Nature Climate Change.

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Caution: Increasing Trend of Foraging for Mushrooms

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mistaking toxic mushrooms for edible ones is common and sometimes deadly, researchers warn in an article published online July 13 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Alcohol Use Appears to Impair Driving More Than Cannabis Use

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking alcohol appears to negatively affect driving skills to a greater extent than smoking cannabis, according to research findings published online June 23 in Drug and Alcohol Dependence. And, combined use leads to greater behind-the-wheel impairment, but it doesn't double the effect.

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Uncontrolled Diabetes Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients with high rates of complications from the disease may face increased risk for dementia, according to a study published online July 9 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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ASCO Updates Guidelines for Colony-Stimulating Factor Use

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The 2006 American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines on use of hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) have been updated, according to a special article published online July 13 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Progress in Reporting Conflict of Interest Among IRB Members

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among institutional review board (IRB) members, there has been positive progress in the reporting and management of conflicts of interest, according to a study published online July 13 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Arts Observation Curriculum May Be Beneficial for Medical Students

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of an arts observation curriculum can help students learn to observe objectively and articulate their observations, which are important traits for clinical practice, according to an article published online July 3 in Academic Medicine.

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Weight Loss Predicts Mortality in Rheumatoid Arthritis

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Weight loss is a strong predictor of mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a study published online June 26 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Structured Exercise Prevents Sleep Issues in Older Adults

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Structured physical activity may prevent poor sleep quality in older adults, according to a study published online June 26 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Coronary Artery Disease Ups Risk of Bowel Bleeds With NSAIDs

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with coronary artery disease are at higher risk of small bowel bleeding (SBB) when taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), according to research published online July 6 in the Journal of Digestive Diseases.

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Secondhand Smoke Exposure Tied to Increased Stroke Risk

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke risk is increased with secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure, according to a study published online June 23 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Lifestyle Intervention Can Ward Off Obesity-Related Knee Pain

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For overweight adults with diabetes mellitus, an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) can prevent knee pain, according to a study published in the July issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Strategies Needed to Combat Weight Gain in Smoking Cessation

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Quitting smoking is associated with weight gain, according to a meta-analysis published online June 26 in Obesity Reviews, and clinicians are encouraged to help patients who are undergoing cessation achieve/maintain a healthy weight.

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Housestaff, Attendings Disagree on Quality of Progress Notes

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Internal medicine attendings and housestaff disagree on the impact of electronic health records (EHRs) on the quality of progress notes, according to a study published online July 2 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Weekend Discharge Not Linked to Increased Readmission

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF), and pneumonia, weekend discharge is not associated with 30-day readmission, according to a study published online June 30 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Training Can Improve Patients' Fluid, Salt Intake in Hemodialysis

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing hemodialysis, a controlled fluid and salt intake training process can decrease consumption of both salt and fluid, according to a study published online June 28 in the Journal of Renal Care.

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Researchers Say Some People Do Age Faster Than Others

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who look older than their years may be aging at an accelerated pace, new research suggests. The findings were published online July 6 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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CDC: Too Few Americans Eating Enough Fruits, Vegetables

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most Americans are not consuming the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables, according to a new report published in the July 10 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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FDA Strengthens Heart Attack, Stroke Warning for NSAIDs

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S Food and Drug Administration on Thursday strengthened the warning labels for non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), regarding increased risk of heart attack or stroke.

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Caution: Handle TCA With Care to Avoid Chemical Burns

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Gynecologists should be aware that accidental exposure to trichloroacetic acid, which is used in routine procedures, may lead to serious chemical burns, according to a case report published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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ECG Metrics May Predict Cardiac Deaths in CKD Patients

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Certain electrocardiographic (ECG) measures may improve prediction of cardiovascular death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to research published online July 9 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Uric Acid Therapy Improves Stroke Outcomes in Women

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Uric acid (UA) therapy, administered in combination with thrombolysis, is more effective in cutting stroke-related disability in women than in men, according to a study published online July 9 in Stroke.

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Arthritis Patients Want Info About Multiple Drug Options

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with inflammatory arthritis want to be informed about multiple current and future treatment options, according to research published in the July issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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T2DM Linked to Declines in Cerebral Vasoreactivity, Cognition

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In as little as two years, patients with type 2 diabetes may exhibit diminished global and regional cerebral vasoreactivity, which could negatively affect cognitive skills, a small study suggests. The findings were published online July 8 in Neurology.

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Low FEV1 in Early Adulthood May Be Important in COPD Genesis

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Low forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) in early adulthood without accelerated decline in FEV1 correlates with later chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published in the July 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Specific Biomarkers ID Cardiac Dysfunction, Mortality Risk in HIV

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Specific biomarkers correlate with cardiovascular dysfunction and all-cause mortality among HIV-infected individuals, according to a study published online July 8 in JACC: Heart Failure.

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CDC: Most Americans in Favor of Raising Legal Smoking Age to 21

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Three-quarters of American adults favor raising the legal smoking age to 21, according to a report published online July 6 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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FDA Approves Entresto for Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved the drug Entresto (sacubitril/valsartan) to treat heart failure.

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Pockets of U.S. Have Excessive Colorectal Cancer Mortality

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People living in 94 counties spread across the lower Mississippi Delta region, in 107 counties in west-central Appalachia, and in 37 counties in eastern Virginia/North Carolina have seen little change in lives lost to colorectal cancer, according to a study published online July 8 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Benefits of Extended Anticoagulation May Not Last

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The benefit of extended anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism dissipates after cessation of active therapy, according to a study published in the July 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC: Heroin Use Up Among Women, Wealthier People

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The face of heroin addiction in the United States is changing, as groups with historically lower rates of heroin use, including women and people with private insurance and higher incomes, are becoming users, federal officials reported Tuesday. The findings were published in the July 7 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Depression Up Among Men With Borderline Testosterone

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Men with borderline testosterone levels frequently have depression and depressive symptoms, according to a study published online June 30 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Non-AIDS In-Hospital Deaths Up in HIV-Infected Patients

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Trends in hospital deaths among HIV-infected patients show that mortality during the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era is often caused by diseases and conditions other than AIDS. The findings were published online June 30 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Correction of Vitamin B-12 Deficiency No Benefit in Seniors

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults, vitamin B-12 supplementation is not associated with improvements in neurologic or cognitive function, according to a study published online July 1 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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ACIP Recommends MenB Vaccine for 16- to 23-Year-Olds

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has voted to issue a category B recommendation for use of two serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccines in patients aged 16 to 23 years for short-term disease prevention, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians.

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Misunderstanding of Term 'Hypertension' May Impact Care

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Misunderstanding of the term hypertension may impact antihypertensive medication use and adherence, according to a perspective piece published online July 7 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Risk of CVD Up in Newly Diagnosed Psoriatic Arthritis

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many newly diagnosed psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients have an increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published in the July issue of Arthritis Care and Research.

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Surveillance Becoming More Common for Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More U.S. physicians are sparing their low-risk prostate cancer patients from prostatectomy, radiation, and androgen deprivation monotherapy in favor of active surveillance/watchful waiting, according to a research letter published in the July 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Life Expectancy Substantially Drops With Disease Combo

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While having one major health problem -- such as diabetes, myocardial infarction, or stroke -- can increase the risk for an early death, new research warns that the risk of dying prematurely goes up significantly for individuals with more than one of these conditions. The findings were reported in the July 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Stroke Tied to Accelerated Cognitive Decline Over Long Term

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who suffer a stroke are more likely to experience an accelerated decline in their global cognition and executive function for at least six years following the acute event, according to a report published in the July 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Researchers ID Patients More Prone to Long-Term Opioid Use

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with prior histories of drug abuse, or current or former smokers, are more likely to go beyond a short-term prescription for opioids, according to research published in the July issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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PCV13 Predicted to Be Cost Saving Versus PCV7

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV-13) is expected to be cost saving compared with PCV7, according to a study published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

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Very Small Brain Lesions Linked to Risk of Stroke, Death

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Very small subclinical cerebral lesions are associated with increased risks of stroke and death, according to a study published in the July 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Coronary Artery Calcification Predicts 15-Year Mortality

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients without symptoms of coronary artery disease, the extent of coronary artery calcification (CAC) predicts 15-year mortality, according to research published in the July 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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HIV-Infected Patients Frequently Have Chronic Pain

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many HIV-infected patients have chronic pain, which frequently co-occurs with high levels of depression symptoms, according to a study published online June 27 in Pain Medicine.

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Court Upholds Medical Liability Damages Cap

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The non-economic damages cap under the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act (MICRA) has been upheld again in a California court of appeal, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Regular Mammograms May Lead to Widespread Overdiagnosis

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Increased numbers of small cancers and precancerous lesions are found in geographical areas where more mammograms take place; however, the higher screening rates are not associated with reduced breast cancer mortality, according to a study published online July 6 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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CDC: BBQ Grill Brush Wires Can Cause Serious GI Injury

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Wire bristles from grill brushes can snap off, land on the grate, and find their way into grilled meats, public health experts warn. If ingested, these bristles can perforate a person's throat and digestive tract, causing potentially life-threatening injuries.

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Despite Risk to Patients, Health Providers Often Work While Sick

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many health care professionals work when they are sick, putting their patients at risk for serious illness or even death, according to a study published online July 6 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Mortality Rates Declining for Many Cancers

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For many cancers, mortality rates are declining and are expected to meet Healthy People 2020 (HP2020) targets, according to a study published online July 2 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Lifestyle Factors Can Halve Heart Failure Risk in Elderly

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The fittest seniors are half as likely as others to suffer from heart failure, according to research published in the July 1 issue of JACC: Heart Failure.

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Genetic Mutations May Impact Outcomes in Aplastic Anemia

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Certain genetic mutations may be correlated with response to therapy and prognosis in aplastic anemia, according to research published in the July 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Questions Raised for Telemedical Monitoring of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Telemedicine monitoring is not associated with any significant difference in amputation or healing, but may be linked to increased mortality for patients with diabetic foot ulcers, according to a study published online June 26 in Diabetes Care.

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Cherry Juice May Reduce Post-Exercise Respiratory Symptoms

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of Montmorency cherry juice (CJ) is associated with a reduction in the development of upper respiratory tract symptoms (URTS) after a marathon, according to a study published online May 11 in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition.

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Health Insurance Expansion Likely to Increase HTN Treatment

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts to expand health insurance coverage are expected to lead to increased treatment rates among nonelderly patients with hypertension, which will have significant health benefits, according to a study published online July 2 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Adolescent Lifestyle Not Strongly Tied to Later Muscular Pain

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adverse health behaviors in adolescence are only moderately associated with later musculoskeletal pain in adulthood, according to a study published in the June issue of Pain Medicine.

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Adapted Diabetes Prevention Program Deemed Effective

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An adapted Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention significantly improves cardiovascular disease-related risk factors among participants, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Offer Multiple Benefits

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs), frequently utilized by emergency medicine physicians and designed to help identify patients who "doctor shop" for prescriptions, are used to guide clinical decisions and opioid prescribing, as well as to facilitate discussions and provide patient education. The findings were published in the June issue of Pain Medicine.

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Asian-Language Smoking Quitline Successful Nationwide

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An Asian-Language Smokers Quitline (ASQ) reaches Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese speakers nationwide, and most callers receive medication and counseling, according to a study published online June 25 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Regional Variation in Treatment of Ischemic Stroke

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There is considerable regional variation in thrombolysis treatment for ischemic stroke, according to a study published online June 2 in Stroke.

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Impact of Statins on Aggression Varies by Sex

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Statin use is associated with decreased aggression in men and increased aggression in women, according to a study published online July 1 in PLOS ONE.

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Once-Daily 3.0 mg Liraglutide Tied to Reduction in Body Weight

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A once-daily dose of 3.0 mg liraglutide, injected subcutaneously, is associated with greater reduction in body weight than placebo, according to a study published in the July 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Additional Years of Secondary Schooling Can Cut HIV Risk

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Additional years of secondary schooling provide a cost-effective HIV prevention measure in Botswana, according to a study published online June 28 in The Lancet Global Health.

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CVD Risk Factor Levels Too High, Even in Best-Performing States

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About half of cardiovascular deaths could be prevented in U.S. adults if five major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors were eliminated, according to a study published online June 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Endurance Athletes Should Only Drink When Thirsty, Experts Say

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes should listen to their body and drink water only when thirsty to prevent exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) or "water intoxication." The new guidelines were developed at the International Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia Consensus Development Conference in Carlsbad, Calif., and published in the July issue of the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine.

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Weight Loss + Vitamin D3 Cuts IL-6 in Postmenopausal Women

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Weight loss of 5 percent or more, combined with vitamin D3 supplementation, is associated with significant reductions in interleukin-6 in postmenopausal women, according to a study published recently in Cancer Prevention Research.

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Sex Differences in CHD Event Risk Vary by Race

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Whites have larger sex differences in the risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) events than blacks, according to a study published online July 1 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Bariatric Surgery Beats Lifestyle Change for T2DM Remission

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Three-year outcomes indicate that bariatric surgery is superior to lifestyle intervention alone for inducing remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in obese patients, according to research published online July 1 in JAMA Surgery.

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IOM: Make CPR Mandatory High School Requirement

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Far too few Americans are surviving cardiac arrest, and a new report issued Tuesday by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) offers strategies to boost survival rates.

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ACP Supports More Behavioral Health in Primary Care

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Behavioral health should be further integrated into the primary care setting, which will necessitate changes to the health care delivery system, payment model, and education and training, according to a position paper published online June 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Residents' Knowledge of High-Value Care Varies

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. internal medicine (IM) residents report varying knowledge and practice of high-value care (HVC), according to research published online June 16 in Academic Medicine.

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Hep C Infections Underreported in the United States

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New cases of hepatitis C are drastically underreported to federal officials, according to a case series and chart review published online June 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Sublingual Immunotherapy Offers Little Benefit for Grass Allergy

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The benefit of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) over placebo for seasonal grass pollen allergies is small, according to new research published online June 29 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Race and Sex Impact Treatment in Newly Diagnosed A-Fib

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients newly diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AF), race and sex may affect treatment, according to a study published in the July issue of Heart Rhythm.

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Public Opinion Sought on New Licensure for Assistant Physicians

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New classification of licensure for assistant physicians has been created, and public opinion is being sought by the Missouri State Board of Registration for the Healing Arts prior to filing these rules with the Secretary of State's Office and the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules.

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Nocturia, Need for Reassurance Key Drivers for Men Seeking Care

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), reasons for seeking medical care include wanting reassurance about not having prostate cancer and the nuisance of symptoms, according to a study published online June 24 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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In Elderly, Moderate Exercise Ups Cholesterol Transfer to HDL

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older women who exercise regularly have higher transfers of unesterified cholesterol (UC) and esterified cholesterol (EC) to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), compared with sedentary women, according to a letter to the editor published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Types/Timing of Physical Activity May Up Incontinence Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For middle-aged women, substantially increased overall lifetime physical activity is associated with slightly increased odds of moderate/severe stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and greater strenuous activity during the teen years may modestly increase SUI risk. The findings were published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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